• With growing data from ongoing and future supernova surveys it is possible to empirically quantify the shapes of SNIa light curves in more detail, and to quantitatively relate the shape parameters with the intrinsic properties of SNIa. Building such relationship is critical in controlling systematic errors associated with supernova cosmology. Based on a collection of well-observed SNIa samples accumulated in the past years, we construct an empirical SNIa light curve model using a statistical method called the functional principal component analysis (FPCA) for sparse and irregularly sampled functional data. Using this method, the entire light curve of an SNIa is represented by a linear combination of principal component functions, and the SNIa is represented by a few numbers called principal component scores. These scores are used to establish relations between light curve shapes and physical quantities such as intrinsic color, interstellar dust reddening, spectral line strength, and spectral classes. These relations allow for descriptions of some critical physical quantities based purely on light curve shape parameters. Our study shows that some important spectral feature information is being encoded in the broad band light curves, for instance, we find that the light curve shapes are correlated with the velocity and velocity gradient of the Si II $\lambda$6355 line. This is important for supernova surveys, e.g., LSST and WFIRST. Moreover, the FPCA light curve model is used to construct the entire light curve shape, which in turn is used in a functional linear form to adjust intrinsic luminosity when fitting distance models.
  • We construct average spectra of host galaxies of slower, faster, bluer, and redder Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the SDSS-II supernova survey. The average spectrum of slower declining (broader light-curve width or higher stretch) SN Ia hosts shows stronger emission lines compared to the average spectrum of faster declining (narrower light-curve width or lower stretch) SN Ia hosts. Using pPXF, we find that hosts of slower declining SNe Ia have metallicities that are, on average, 0.24 dex lower than average metallicities of faster declining SN Ia hosts. Similarly, redder SN Ia hosts have slightly higher metallicities than bluer SN Ia hosts. Lick index analysis of metallic lines and Balmer lines show that faster declining SN Ia hosts have relatively higher metal content and have relatively older stellar populations compared with slower declining SN Ia hosts. We calculate average $\rm H_{\alpha}$ Star Formation Rate (SFR), stellar mass, and the specific-SFR (sSFR) of host galaxies in these subgroups of SNe Ia. We find that slower declining SN Ia hosts have significantly higher ($>5\sigma$) sSFR than faster declining SN Ia hosts. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test shows that these two types of hosts originate from different parent distributions. Our results, when compared with the models of \cite{childress14}, indicate that slower declining SNe Ia, being hosted in actively star-forming galaxies, are young (prompt) SNe Ia, originating from similar progenitor age groups.
  • JWST was conceived and built to answer one of the most fundamental questions that humans can address empirically: "How did the Universe make its first stars?". Our First Lights At REionization (FLARE) project transforms the quest for the epoch of reionization from the static to the time domain. It targets the complementary question: "What happened to those first stars?". It will be answered by observations of the most luminous events: supernovae and accretion on to black holes formed by direct collapse from the primordial gas clouds. These transients provide direct constraints on star-formation rates (SFRs) and the truly initial Initial Mass Function (IMF), and they may identify possible stellar seeds of supermassive black holes (SMBHs). Furthermore, our knowledge of the physics of these events at ultra-low metallicity will be much expanded. JWST's unique capabilities will detect these most luminous and earliest cosmic messengers easily in fairly shallow observations. However, these events are very rare at the dawn of cosmic structure formation and so require large area coverage. Time domain astronomy can be advanced to an unprecedented depth by means of a shallow field of JWST reaching 27 mag AB in 2 and 4.4 microns over a field as large as 0.1 square degree visited multiple times each year. Such a survey may set strong constraints or detect massive Pop III SNe at redshifts beyond 10, pinpointing the redshift of the first stars, or at least their death. Based on our current knowledge of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe), such a survey will find one or more SLSNe at redshifts above 6 in five years and possibly several direct collapse black holes. Although JWST is not designed as a wide field survey telescope, we show that such a wide field survey is possible with JWST and is critical in addressing several of its key scientific goals.
  • The LIGO detection of gravitational waves (GW) from merging black holes in 2015 marked the beginning of a new era in observational astronomy. The detection of an electromagnetic signal from a GW source is the critical next step to explore in detail the physics involved. The Antarctic Survey Telescopes (AST3), located at Dome A, Antarctica, is uniquely situated for rapid response time-domain astronomy with its continuous night-time coverage during the austral winter. We report optical observations of the GW source (GW~170817) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4993 using AST3. The data show a rapidly fading transient at around 1 day after the GW trigger, with the $i$-band magnitude declining from $17.23\pm0.13$ magnitude to $17.72\pm0.09$ magnitude in $\sim 1.8$ hour. The brightness and time evolution of the optical transient associated with GW~170817 are broadly consistent with the predictions of models involving merging binary neutron stars. We infer from our data that the merging process ejected about $\sim 10^{-2}$ solar mass of radioactive material at a speed of up to $30\%$ the speed of light.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. Though the uniformity of their light curves makes them powerful cosmological distance indicators, long-standing issues remain regarding their progenitors and explosion mechanisms. Recent detection of the early ultraviolet pulse of a peculiar subluminous SN Ia has been claimed as new evidence for the companion-ejecta interaction through the single-degenerate channel. Here, we report the discovery of a prominent but red optical flash at $\sim$ 0.5 days after the explosion of a SN Ia which shows hybrid features of different SN Ia sub-classes: a light curve typical of normal-brightness SNe Ia, but with strong titanium absorptions, commonly seen in the spectra of subluminous ones. We argue that the early flash of such a hybrid SN Ia is different from predictions of previously suggested scenarios such as the companion-ejecta interaction. Instead it can be naturally explained by a SN explosion triggered by a detonation of a thin helium shell either on a near-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf ($\gtrsim$ 1.3 M$_{\odot}$) with low-yield $^{56}$Ni or on a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf ($\sim$ 1.0 M$_{\odot}$) merging with a less massive white dwarf. This finding provides compelling evidence that one branch of the previously proposed explosion models, the helium-ignition scenario, does exist in nature, and such a scenario may account for explosions of white dwarfs in a wider mass range in contrast to what was previously supposed.
  • An interesting transient has been detected in one of our three Dark Energy Camera deep fields. Observations of these deep fields take advantage of the high red sensitivity of DECam on the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory Blanco telescope. The survey includes the Y band with rest wavelength 1430{\AA} at z = 6. Survey fields (the Prime field 0555-6130, the 16hr field 1600-75 and the SUDSS New Southern Field) are deeper in Y than other infrared surveys. They are circumpolar, allowing all night to be used efficiently, exploiting the moon tolerance of 1 micron observations to minimize conflict with the Dark Energy Survey. As an i-band dropout (meaning that the flux decrement shortward of Lyman alpha is in the i bandpass), the transient we report here is a supernova candidate with z ~ 6, with a luminosity comparable to the brightest known current epoch superluminous supernova (i.e., ~ 2 x 10^11 solar luminosities).
  • The summit of the Antarctic plateau, Dome A, is proving to be an excellent site for optical, NIR, and THz astronomical observations. GATTINI was a wide-field camera installed on the PLATO instrument module as part of the Chinese-led traverse to Dome A in January, 2009. We present here the measurements of sky brightness with the Gattini ultra-large field of view (90 deg x 90 deg) in the photometric B-, V-, and R-bands, cloud cover statistics measured during the 2009 winter season, and an estimate of the sky transparency. A cumulative probability distribution indicates that the darkest 10% of the nights at Dome A have sky brightness of S_B = 22.98, S_V = 21.86, and S_R = 21.68 mag arcsec^{-2}. These values were obtained around the year 2009 with minimum aurora, and they are comparable to the faintest sky brightness at Mauna Kea and the best sites of northern Chile. Since every filter includes strong auroral lines that effectively contaminate the sky brightness measurements, for instruments working around the auroral lines, either with custom filters or with high spectral resolution instruments, these values could be easily obtained on a more routine basis. In addition, we present example light curves for bright targets to emphasize the unprecedented observational window function available from this ground-based site. These light curves will be published in a future paper.
  • We present six epochs of spectropolarimetric observations and one epoch of spectroscopy of the Type Ib SN iPTF 13bvn. The epochs of these observations correspond to $-$10 to $+$61 days with respect to the {\it r}-band light curve maximum. The continuum is intrinsically polarised to the $0.2-0.4\%$ level throughout the observations, implying asphericities of $\sim10\%$ in the shape of the photosphere. We observe significant line polarisation associated with the spectral features of Ca II IR3, He I/Na I D, He I {\lambda}{\lambda}6678, 7065, Fe II {\lambda}4924 and O I {\lambda}7774. We propose that an absorption feature at $\sim 6200\mathrm{\AA}$, usually identified as Si II $\lambda 6355$, is most likely to be high velocity $\mathrm{H\alpha}$ at $-16,400$ $\mathrm{km \; s^{-1}}$. Two distinctly polarised components, separated in velocity, are detected for both He I/Na I D and Ca II IR3, indicating the presence of two discrete line forming regions in the ejecta in both radial velocity space and in the plane of the sky. We use the polarisation of He I $\lambda 5876$ as a tracer of sources of non-thermal excitation in the ejecta; finding that the bulk of the radioactive nickel was constrained to lie interior to $\sim 50-65\%$ of the ejecta radius. The observed polarisation is also discussed in the context of the possible progenitor system of iPTF 13bvn, with our observations favouring the explosion of a star with an extended, distorted envelope rather than a compact Wolf-Rayet star.
  • Superluminous supernovae are beginning to be discovered at redshifts as early as the epoch of reionization. A number of candidate mechanisms is reviewed, together with the discovery programs.
  • We present a sequence of eight spectropolarimetric observations monitoring the geometric evolution of the late phase of the major 2012 outburst of SN 2009ip. These were acquired with the FORS2 polarimeter mounted on ESO VLT. The continuum was polarised at 0.3-0.8 per cent throughout the observations, showing that the photosphere deviated substantially from spherical symmetry by 10-15 per cent. Significant line polarisation is detected for both hydrogen and helium at high velocities. The similarity in the polarised signal between these elements indicates that they form in the same location in the ejecta. The line polarisation (p$\sim$1-1.5 per cent) at low velocities revealed the presence of a highly-aspherical hydrogen and helium rich circumstellar medium (CSM). Monte Carlo simulations of the observed polarimetry were performed in an effort to constrain the shape of the CSM. The simulations imply that the polarimetry can be understood within the framework of a disk-like CSM inclined by 14$\pm$2 degrees out of the line of sight, obscuring the photosphere only at certain epochs. The varying temporal evolution of polarisation at high and low velocities indicated that the fast-moving ejecta expanded with a preferred direction orthogonal to that of the CSM.
  • AST3-1 is the second-generation wide-field optical photometric telescope dedicated to time domain astronomy at Dome A, Antarctica. Here we present the results of $i$ band images survey from AST3-1 towards one Galactic disk field. Based on time-series photometry of 92,583 stars, 560 variable stars were detected with $i$ magnitude $\leq$ 16.5 mag during eight days of observations; 339 of these are previously unknown variables. We tentatively classify the 560 variables as 285 eclipsing binaries (EW, EB, EA), 27 pulsating variable stars ($\delta$~Scuti, $\gamma$~Doradus, $\delta$~Cephei variable and RR Lyrae stars) and 248 other types of variables (unclassified periodic, multi-periodic and aperiodic variable stars). Among the eclipsing binaries, 34 show O'Connell effects. One of the aperiodic variables shows a plateau light curve and another one shows a secondary maximum after peak brightness. We also detected a complex binary system with RS CVn-like light curve morphology; this object is being followed-up spectroscopically using the Gemini South telescope.
  • SN 2013ej is a well-studied core-collapse supernova (SN) that stemmed from a directly identified red supergiant (RSG) progenitor in galaxy M74. The source exhibits signs of substantial geometric asphericity, X-rays from persistent interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), thermal emission from warm dust, and a light curve that appears intermediate between supernovae of Types II-P and II-L. The proximity of this source motivates a close inspection of these physical characteristics and their potential interconnection. We present multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SN 2013ej during the first 107 days, and deep optical spectroscopy and ultraviolet through infrared photometry past ~800 days. SN 2013ej exhibits the strongest and most persistent continuum and line polarization ever observed for a SN of its class during the recombination phase. Modeling indicates that the data are consistent with an oblate ellipsoidal photosphere, viewed nearly edge-on, and probably augmented by optical scattering from circumstellar dust. We suggest that interaction with an equatorial distribution of CSM, perhaps the result of binary evolution, is responsible for generating the photospheric asphericity. Relatedly, our late-time optical imaging and spectroscopy shows that asymmetric CSM interaction is ongoing, and the morphology of broad H-alpha emission from shock-excited ejecta provides additional evidence that the geometry of the interaction region is ellipsoidal. Alternatively, a prolate ellipsoidal geometry from an intrinsically bipolar explosion is also a plausible interpretation of the data, but would probably require a ballistic jet of radioactive material capable of penetrating the hydrogen envelope early in the recombination phase (abridged).
  • We present the measurement of the size and surface brightness of the expanding light echoes from supernova (SN) 2014J in the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS/WFC images were taken ~277 and ~416 days (after the time of B-band maximum light) in the filters F475W, F606W, and F775W, each combined with the three polarizing filters: POL0V, POL60V, and POL120V. The two epochs' imaging reveals the time evolution of at least two major echoes. Three concentric bright regions between position angles (PA, 0^{\circ} from North, counterclockwise). 80^{\circ} ~ 170^{\circ} have projected radius of 0.60" on the sky on ~277 days and expanding to 0.75" on ~416 days, corresponding to scattering materials at a foreground distance of 222\pm37 pc. Another fainter but evident light echo extending over a wide range of PA has radii of 0.75" and 0.96" on ~277 and ~416 days. This corresponds to scattering material at a foreground distance of 367\pm61 pc. Multiple light echoes with S/N > 2.5 reside at smaller radii on ~277 days but become less significant on ~416 days indicating a complex structure of foreground interstellar medium (ISM). The light echo shows bluer color than predicted under a Rayleigh scattering case. We also found the light echo brightened from V_{echo}=21.68\pm0.07 on 2014 September 5, to V_{echo}=21.05\pm0.08 on 2014 November 6, suggesting an enhancement of echoing materials at different distances projected on to the plane of the sky.
  • Extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations are presented for SN 2014cx, a type IIP supernova (SN) exploding in the nearby galaxy NGC 337. The observations are performed in optical and ultraviolet bands, covering from -20 to +400 days from the peak light. The stringent detection limit from prediscovery images suggests that this supernova was actually detected within about 1 day after explosion. Evolution of the very early-time light curve of SN 2014cx is similar to that predicted from a shock breakout and post-shock cooling decline before reaching the optical peak. Our photometric observations show that SN 2014cx has a plateau duration of ~ 100 days, an absolute V-band magnitude of ~ -16.5 mag at t~50 days, and a nickel mass of 0.056+-0.008 Msun. The spectral evolution of SN 2014cx resembles that of normal SNe IIP like SN 1999em and SN 2004et, except that it has a slightly higher expansion velocity (~ 4200 km/s at 50 days). From the cooling curve of photospheric temperature, we derive that the progenitor has a pre-explosion radius of ~ 640 Rsun, consistent with those obtained from SNEC modeling (~ 620 Rsun) and hydrodynamical modeling of the observables (~ 570 Rsun). Moreover, the hydrodynamical simulations yield a total explosion energy of ~ 0.4*10e51 erg, and an ejected mass of ~ 8 Msun. These results indicate that the immediate progenitor of SN 2014cx is likely a red supergiant star with a mass of ~ 10 Msun.
  • The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) is the first Chinese astronomical instrument placed in Antarctica. It is a group of four identical, fully automatic $14.5\,\rm{cm}$ telescopes, with an field of view (FOV) of $20\,\rm{deg^2}$ centered on the South Celestial Pole. Placed at Antarctic Dome A, CSTAR is designed to provide high-cadence photometry for site monitoring and variable sources detection. During the 2008 observing season, CSTAR has taken high-precision photometric data for 18,145 stars around the South Celestial Pole. At $i\,=\,7.5$ and $12$, the photometric precision reaches $\sim 8$ mmag and $\sim 30$ mmag with a cadence of 20s or 30s, respectively. Using robust detection method, we have found 15 stellar flares on 13 sources, including two classified variables. We have also found a linear relation between the decay times and the total durations of the stellar flares. The details of all detected flares along with their stellar properties are presented in this work.
  • We present and discuss ultraviolet and optical photometry from the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope and X-ray limits from the X-Ray Telescope on Swift and imaging polarimetry and ultraviolet/optical spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope of ASASSN-15lh. It has been classified as a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN I) more luminous than any other supernova observed. ASASSN-15lh is not detected in the X-rays in individual or coadded observations. From the polarimetry we determine that the explosion was only mildly asymmetric. We find the flux of ASASSN-15lh to increase strongly into the ultraviolet, with a ultraviolet luminosity a hundred times greater than the hydrogen-rich, ultraviolet-bright SLSN II SN 2008es. We find objects as bright as ASASSN-15lh are easily detectable beyond redshifts of ~4 with the single-visit depths planned for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Deep near-infrared surveys could detect such objects past a redshift of ~20 enabling a probe of the earliest star formation. A late rebrightening -- most prominent at shorter wavelengths -- is seen about two months after the peak brightness, which is itself as bright as a superluminous supernova. The ultraviolet spectra during the rebrightening are dominated by the continuum without the broad absorption or emission lines seen in SLSNe or tidal disruption events and the early optical spectra of ASASSN-15lh. Our spectra show no strong hydrogen emission, showing only LyA absorption near the redshift previously found by optical absorption lines of the presumed host. The properties of ASASSN-15lh are extreme when compared to either SLSNe or tidal disruption events.
  • The high Antarctic plateau provides exceptional conditions for conducting infrared observations of the cosmos on account of the cold, dry and stable atmosphere above the ice surface. This paper describes the scientific goals behind the first program to examine the time-varying universe in the infrared from Antarctica - the Kunlun Infrared Sky Survey (KISS). This will employ a small (50 cm aperture) telescope to monitor the southern skies in the 2.4um Kdark window from China's Kunlun station at Dome A, on the summit of the Antarctic plateau, through the uninterrupted 4-month period of winter darkness. An earlier paper discussed optimisation of the Kdark filter for the best sensitivity (Li et al 2016). This paper examines the scientific program for KISS. We calculate the sensitivity of the camera for the extrema of observing conditions that will be encountered. We present the parameters for sample surveys that could then be carried out for a range of cadences and sensitivities. We then discuss several science programs that could be conducted with these capabilities, involving star formation, brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters, exoplanets around M dwarfs, the terminal phases of stellar evolution, discovering fast transients as part of multi-wavelength campaigns, embedded supernova searches, reverberation mapping of active galactic nuclei, gamma ray bursts and the detection of the cosmic infrared background. Accepted for publication in PASA, 04/08/16.
  • The absorption feature O I 7773 is an important spectral indicator for type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) that can be used to trace the unburned material at outer layers of the exploding white dwarf. In this work, we use a large sample of SNe~Ia to examine this absorption at early phases (i.e., -13 days <t <-7 days), and make comparisons with the absorption features of Si~II 6355 and Ca~II near-infrared (NIR) triplet. We show that for a subgroup of spectroscopically normal SNe with normal photospheric velocities (i.e., v_si < 12,500 km s^{-1} at optical maximum), the line strength of high velocity feature (HVF) of O~I is inversely correlated with that of Si~II (or Ca~II), and this feature also shows a negative correlation with the luminosity of SNe Ia. This finding, together with other features we find for the O~I HVF, reveal that for this subgroup of SNe~Ia explosive oxygen burning occurs at the outermost layer of supernova and difference in burning there could lead to the observed diversity, which are in remarkable agreement with the popular delayed-detonation model of Chandrasekhar mass WD.
  • The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) carried out high-cadence time-series observations of 20.1 square degrees centered on the South Celestial Pole during the 2008, 2009 & 2010 winter seasons from Dome A in Antarctica. The nearly-continuous 6 months of dark conditions during each observing season allowed for >10^6 images to be collected through gri and clear filters, resulting in the detection of >10^4 sources over the course of 3 years of operation. The nearly space-like conditions in the Antarctic plateau are an ideal testbed for the suitability of very small-aperture (<20 cm) telescopes to detect transient events, variable stars and stellar flares. We present the results of a robust search for such objects using difference image analysis of the data obtained during the 2009 & 2010 winter seasons. While no transients were found, we detected 29 flaring events and find a normalized flaring rate of 5+\-4x10^-7 flare/hour for late-K dwarfs, 1+\-1x10^-6 flare/hour for M dwarfs and 7+\-1x10^-7 flare/hour for all other stars in our sample. We suggest future small-aperture telescopes planned for deployment at Dome A would benefit from a tracking mechanism, to help alleviate effects from ghosting, and a finer pixel scale, to increase the telescope's sensitivity to faint objects. We find that the light curves of non-transient sources have excellent photometric qualities once corrected for systematics, and are limited only by photon noise and atmospheric scintillation.
  • The Kunlun Infrared Sky Survey will be the first comprehensive exploration of the time varying Universe in the infrared. A key feature in optimizing the scientific yield of this ambitious research program is the choice of the survey passband. In particular the survey aims to maximally exploit the unique thermal and atmospheric conditions pertaining to the high Antarctic site. By simulating the expected signal-to-noise for varying filter properties within the so-called "K_DARK" 2.4um window, filter performance can be tuned and best-case designs are given covering a range of conditions.
  • We present well-sampled optical observations of the bright Type Ia supernova (SN~Ia) SN 2011fe in M101. Our data, starting from $\sim16$ days before maximum light and extending to $\sim463$ days after maximum, provide an unprecedented time series of spectra and photometry for a normal SN~Ia. Fitting the early-time rising light curve, we find that the luminosity evolution of SN 2011fe follows a $t^n$ law, with the index $n$ being close to 2.0 in the $VRI$ bands but slightly larger in the $U$ and $B$ bands. Combining the published ultraviolet (UV) and near-infrared (NIR) photometry, we derive the contribution of UV/NIR emission relative to the optical. SN 2011fe is found to have stronger UV emission and reaches its UV peak a few days earlier than other SNe~Ia with similar $\Delta m_{15}(B)$, suggestive of less trapping of high-energy photons in the ejecta. Moreover, the $U$-band light curve shows a notably faster decline at late phases ($t\approx 100$--300 days), which also suggests that the ejecta may be relatively transparent to UV photons. These results favor the notion that SN 2011fe might have a progenitor system with relatively lower metallicity. On the other hand, the early-phase spectra exhibit prominent high-velocity features (HVFs) of O~I $\lambda$7773 and the Ca~II~NIR triplet, but only barely detectable in Si~II~6355. This difference can be caused either by an ionization/temperature effect or an abundance enhancement scenario for the formation of HVFs; it suggests that the photospheric temperature of SN 2011fe is intrinsically low, perhaps owing to incomplete burning during the explosion of the white dwarf.
  • The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) is the first telescope facility built at Dome A, Antarctica. During the 2008 observing season, the installation provided long-baseline and high-cadence photometric observations in the i-band for 18,145 targets within 20 deg2 CSTAR field around the South Celestial Pole for the purpose of monitoring the astronomical observing quality of Dome A and detecting various types of photometric variability. Using sensitive and robust detection methods, we discover 274 potential variables from this data set, 83 of which are new discoveries. We characterize most of them, providing the periods, amplitudes and classes of variability. The catalog of all these variables is presented along with the discussion of their statistical properties.
  • The Chinese Small Telescope ARray (CSTAR) has observed an area around the Celestial South Pole at Dome A since 2008. About $20,000$ light curves in the i band were obtained lasting from March to July, 2008. The photometric precision achieves about 4 mmag at i = 7.5 and 20 mmag at i = 12 within a 30 s exposure time. These light curves are analyzed using Lomb--Scargle, Phase Dispersion Minimization, and Box Least Squares methods to search for periodic signals. False positives may appear as a variable signature caused by contaminating stars and the observation mode of CSTAR. Therefore the period and position of each variable candidate are checked to eliminate false positives. Eclipsing binaries are removed by visual inspection, frequency spectrum analysis and locally linear embedding technique. We identify 53 eclipsing binaries in the field of view of CSTAR, containing 24 detached binaries, 8 semi-detached binaries, 18 contact binaries, and 3 ellipsoidal variables. To derive the parameters of these binaries, we use the Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence (EBAI) method. The primary and the secondary eclipse timing variations (ETVs) for semi-detached and contact systems are analyzed. Correlated primary and secondary ETVs confirmed by false alarm tests may indicate an unseen perturbing companion. Through ETV analysis, we identify two triple systems (CSTAR J084612.64-883342.9 and CSTAR J220502.55-895206.7). The orbital parameters of the third body in CSTAR J220502.55-895206.7 are derived using a simple dynamical model.
  • The effect of metallicity on the observed light of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) could lead to systematic errors as the absolute magnitudes of local and distant SNe Ia are compared to measure luminosity distances and determine cosmological parameters. The UV light may be especially sensitive to metallicity, though different modeling methods disagree as to the magnitude, wavelength dependence, and even the sign of the effect. The outer density structure, ^56 Ni, and to a lesser degree asphericity, also impact the UV. We compute synthetic photometry of various metallicity-dependent models and compare to UV/optical photometry from the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope. We find that the scatter in the mid-UV to near-UV colors is larger than predicted by changes in metallicity alone and is not consistent with reddening. We demonstrate that a recently employed method to determine relative abundances using UV spectra can be done using UVOT photometry, but we warn that accurate results require an accurate model of the cause of the variations. The abundance of UV photometry now available should provide constraints on models that typically rely on UV spectroscopy for constraining metallicity, density, and other parameters. Nevertheless, UV spectroscopy for a variety of SN explosions is still needed to guide the creation of accurate models. A better understanding of the influences affecting the UV is important for using SNe Ia as cosmological probes, as the UV light may test whether SNe Ia are significantly affected by evolutionary effects.
  • The Tsinghua University-National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) Transient Survey (TNTS) is an automatic survey for a systematic exploration of optical transients (OTs), conducted with a 60/90 cm Schmidt telescope at Xinglong station of NAOC. This survey repeatedly covers ~ 1000 square degrees of the north sky with a cadence of 3-4 days. With an exposure of 60 s, the survey reaches a limited unfiltered magnitude of about 19.5 mag. This enables us to discover supernovae at their relatively young stages. In this paper, we describe the overall performance of our survey during the first year and present some preliminary results.