• Nonclassical correlations have been found useful in many quantum information processing tasks, and various measures have been proposed to quantify these correlations. In this work, we mainly study one of nonclassical correlations, called measurement-induced nonlocality (MIN). First, we establish a close connection between this nonlocal effect and the Bell nonlocality for two-qubit states. Then, we derive a tight monogamy relation of MIN for any pure three-qubit state and provide an alternative way to obtain similar monogamy relations for other nonclassical correlation measures, including squared negativity, quantum discord, and geometric quantum discord. Finally, we find that the tight monogamy relation of MIN is violated by some mixed three-qubit states, however, a weaker monogamy relation of MIN for mixed states and even multi-qubit states is still obtained.
  • This paper studies the dynamics of a network-based SIRS epidemic model with vaccination and a nonmonotone incidence rate. This type of nonlinear incidence can be used to describe the psychological or inhibitory effect from the behavioral change of the susceptible individuals when the number of infective individuals on heterogeneous networks is getting larger. Using the analytical method, epidemic threshold $R_0$ is obtained. When $R_0$ is less than one, we prove the disease-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable and the disease dies out, while $R_0$ is greater than one, there exists a unique endemic equilibrium. By constructing a suitable Lyapunov function, we also prove the endemic equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable if the inhibitory factor $\alpha$ is sufficiently large. Numerical experiments are also given to support the theoretical results. It is shown both theoretically and numerically a larger $\alpha$ can accelerate the extinction of the disease and reduce the level of disease.
  • Feedback is the core concept in cybernetics and its effective use has made great success in but not limited to the fields of engineering, biology, and computer science. When feedback is used to quantum systems, two major types of feedback control protocols including coherent feedback control (CFC) and measurement-based feedback control (MFC) have been developed. In this paper, we compare the two types of quantum feedback control protocols by focusing on the real-time information used in the feedback loop and the capability in dealing with parameter uncertainty. An equivalent relationship is established between quantum CFC and non-selective quantum MFC in the form of operator-sum representation. Using several examples of quantum feedback control, we show that quantum MFC can theoretically achieve better performance than quantum CFC in stabilizing a quantum state and dealing with Hamiltonian parameter uncertainty. The results enrich understanding of the relative advantages between quantum MFC and quantum CFC, and can provide useful information in choosing suitable feedback protocols for quantum systems.
  • Recent developments of technology have enabled atomic spins as the most sensitive inertial and magnetic sensors. Atomic spin gyroscope (magnetometer) essentially outputs the estimate of the inertial rotation rate (magnetic filed) to be measured. Conventional methods for estimating a static or quasi-static inertial rotation rate (magnetic field) employ the dependency relationship between the steady state signal and the input rotation rate (magnetic field). In this paper we present an extended Kalman filter (EKF) method for the atomic spin gyroscope and magnetometer. It is demonstrated that the EKF method is much more accurate and faster than the conventional steady state estimation method.