• We investigate the light-curve properties of a sample of 26 spectroscopically confirmed hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) in the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey. These events are brighter than SNe Ib/c and SNe Ic-BL, on average, by about 4 and 2~mag, respectively. The peak absolute magnitudes of SLSNe-I in rest-frame $g$ band span $-22\lesssim M_g \lesssim-20$~mag, and these peaks are not powered by radioactive $^{56}$Ni, unless strong asymmetries are at play. The rise timescales are longer for SLSNe than for normal SNe Ib/c, by roughly 10 days, for events with similar decay times. Thus, SLSNe-I can be considered as a separate population based on photometric properties. After peak, SLSNe-I decay with a wide range of slopes, with no obvious gap between rapidly declining and slowly declining events. The latter events show more irregularities (bumps) in the light curves at all times. At late times, the SLSN-I light curves slow down and cluster around the $^{56}$Co radioactive decay rate. Powering the late-time light curves with radioactive decay would require between 1 and 10${\rm M}_\odot$ of Ni masses. Alternatively, a simple magnetar model can reasonably fit the majority of SLSNe-I light curves, with four exceptions, and can mimic the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Co, up to $\sim400$ days from explosion. The resulting spin values do not correlate with the host-galaxy metallicities. Finally, the analysis of our sample cannot strengthen the case for using SLSNe-I for cosmology.
  • SN2017egm is the closest (z=0.03) H-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN-I) detected to date, and a rare example of an SLSN-I in a massive and metal-rich galaxy. Here we present the HST UV & optical spectra covering (1000 - 5500)A taken at +3 day relative to the peak. Our data reveal two sets of absorption systems, separated by 235 km/s, at redshifts matching the host galaxy, NGC3191 and its companion galaxy 73 arcsec apart. Weakly damped Lyman-alpha absorption lines are detected at these two redshifts, with HI column densities of $(3.0\pm0.8)\times10^{19}$ and $(3.7\pm0.9)\times10^{19}$\,cm$^{-2}$ respectively. This is an order of magnitude smaller than HI column densities in the disks of nearby galaxies ($>10^{10}M_\odot$) and suggests that SN2017egm is on the near side of NGC3191 and has a low host extinction (E(B-V)=0.007). Using unsaturated metal absorption lines and taking into account of H ionization and dust depletion corrections, we find that the host of SN2017egm probably has a solar or higher metallicity and is unlikely to be a dwarf companion to NGC3191. Comparison of early-time UV spectra of SN2017egm, Gaia16apd, iPTF13ajg and PTF12dam finds that the continuum at wavelength > 2800A is well fit by a blackbody, whereas the continuum at wavelength < 2800A is considerably below the model. The degree of UV suppression varies from source to source, with the 1400A to 2800A continuum flux ratio of 1.5 for Gaia16apd and 0.4 for iPTF13ajg. This can not be explained by the differences in magnetar power or blackbody temperature (i.e. color temperature). Finally, the UV spectra reveal a common set of seven broad absorption features and their equivalent widths are similar (within a factor of 2) among the four events. These seven features bode well for future high-z SLSN-I spectral classifications.
  • Most Type I superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) reported to date have been identified by their high peak luminosities and spectra lacking obvious signs of hydrogen. We demonstrate that these events can be distinguished from normal-luminosity SNe (including Type Ic events) solely from their spectra over a wide range of light-curve phases. We use this distinction to select 19 SLSNe-I and 4 possible SLSNe-I from the Palomar Transient Factory archive (including 7 previously published objects). We present 127 new spectra of these objects and combine these with 39 previously published spectra, and we use these to discuss the average spectral properties of SLSNe-I at different spectral phases. We find that Mn II most probably contributes to the ultraviolet spectral features after maximum light, and we give a detailed study of the O II features that often characterize the early-time optical spectra of SLSNe-I. We discuss the velocity distribution of O II, finding that for some SLSNe-I this can be confined to a narrow range compared to relatively large systematic velocity shifts. Mg II and Fe II favor higher velocities than O II and C II, and we briefly discuss how this may constrain power-source models. We tentatively group objects by how well they match either SN 2011ke or PTF12dam and discuss the possibility that physically distinct events may have been previously grouped together under the SLSN-I label.
  • We report the discovery of a sample of 19 low redshift (z<0.22) spectroscopically non-Seyfert galaxies that show slow declining mid-infrared (MIR) light-curves (LCs), similar to those of tidal disruption event (TDE) candidates with extreme coronal lines. Two sources also showed a relatively fast rising MIR LCs. They consist of 61% sample of the WISE MIR variable non-Seyfert galaxies with SDSS spectra. In a comparison sample of optically selected Seyfert galaxies, the fraction of sources with such a LC is only 15%. After rejecting 5 plausible obscured Seyfert galaxies with red MIR colours, remaining 14 objects are studied in detail in this paper. We fit the declining part of LC with an exponential law, and the decay time is typically one year. The observed peak MIR luminosities ($\nu L_\nu$) after subtracting host galaxies are in the range of a few 10^42 to 10^44 erg~s^-1 with a median of 5x10^43 erg~s^-1 in the W2 band. The black hole masses distribute in a wide range with more than half in between 10^7 to 10^8 ~M_sun, but significantly different from that of optical/UV selected TDEs. Furthermore, MIR luminosities are correlated with black hole masses, the stellar mass or luminosity of their host bulges. Most galaxies in the sample are red and luminous with an absolute magnitude of r between -20 to -23. We estimate the rate of event about 10^-4 gal^-1~yr^-1 among luminous red galaxies. We discuss several possibilities for the variable infrared sources, and conclude that most likely, they are caused by short sporadic fueling to the supermassive black holes via either the instability of accretion flows or tidal disruption of stars.
  • We revisit the proposed extended Schmidt law (Shi et al. 2011) which points that the star formation efficiency in galaxies depends on the stellar mass surface density, by investigating spatially-resolved star formation rates (SFRs), gas masses and stellar masses of star formation regions in a vast range of galactic environments, from the outer disks of dwarf galaxies to spiral disks and to merging galaxies as well as individual molecular clouds in M33. We find that these regions are distributed in a tight power-law as Sigma_SFR ~(Sigma_star^0.5 Sigma_gas )^1.09, which is also valid for the integrated measurements of disk and merging galaxies at high-z. Interestingly, we show that star formation regions in the outer disks of dwarf galaxies with Sigma_SFR down to 10^(-5) Msun/yr/kpc^2, which are outliers of both Kennicutt-Schmidt and Silk-Elmegreen law, also follow the extended Schmidt law. Other outliers in the Kennicutt-Schmidt law, such as extremely-metal poor star-formation regions, also show significantly reduced deviations from the extended Schmidt law. These results suggest an important role for existing stars in helping to regulate star formation through the effect of their gravity on the mid-plane pressure in a wide range of galactic environments.
  • The Zwicky Transient Facility is a new robotic-observing program, in which a newly engineered 600-MP digital camera with a pioneeringly large field of view, 47~square degrees, will be installed into the 48-inch Samuel Oschin Telescope at the Palomar Observatory. The camera will generate $\sim 1$~petabyte of raw image data over three years of operations. In parallel related work, new hardware and software systems are being developed to process these data in real time and build a long-term archive for the processed products. The first public release of archived products is planned for early 2019, which will include processed images and astronomical-source catalogs of the northern sky in the $g$ and $r$ bands. Source catalogs based on two different methods will be generated for the archive: aperture photometry and point-spread-function fitting.
  • PS16dtm was classified as a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) in a dwarf Seyfert 1 galaxy with low-mass black hole ($\sim10^6M\odot$) and has presented various intriguing photometric and spectra characteristics. Using the archival WISE and the newly released NEOWISE data, we found PS16dtm is experiencing a mid-infrared (MIR) flare which started $\sim11$ days before the first optical detection. Interpreting the MIR flare as a dust echo requires close pre-existing dust with a high covering factor, and suggests the optical flare may have brightened slowly for some time before it became bright detectable from the ground. More evidence is given at the later epochs. At the peak of the optical light curve, the new inner radius of the dust torus has grown to much larger size, a factor of 7 of the initial radius due to strong radiation field. At $\sim150$ days after the first optical detection, the dust temperature has dropped well below the sublimation temperature. Other peculiar spectral features shown by PS16dtm are the transient, prominent FeII emission lines and outflows indicated by broad absorption lines detected during the optical flare. Our model explains the enhanced FeII emission from iron newly released from the evaporated dust. The observed broad absorption line outflow could be explained by accelerated gas in the dust torus due to the radiation pressure.
  • We present observations of two new hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSN-I), iPTF15esb and iPTF16bad, showing late-time H-alpha emission with line luminosities of (1-3)e+41 erg/s and velocity widths of (4000-6000) km/s. Including the previously published iPTF13ehe, this makes up a total of three such events to date. iPTF13ehe is one of the most luminous and the slowest evolving SLSNe-I, whereas the other two are less luminous and fast decliners. We interpret this as a result of the ejecta running into a neutral H-shell located at a radius of ~ 1.0e+16cm. This implies that violent mass loss must have occurred several decades before the supernova explosion. Such a short time interval suggests that eruptive mass loss could be common shortly prior to the death of a massive star as a SLSN. And more importantly, helium is unlikely to be completely stripped off the progenitor stars and could be present in the ejecta. It is a mystery why helium features are not detected, even though non-thermal energy sources, capable of ionizing He atoms, may exist as suggested by the O II absorption series in the early time spectra. At late times (+240d), our spectra appear to have intrinsically lower [O I]6300A luminosities than that of SN2015bn and SN2007bi, possibly an indication of smaller oxygen masses (<10-30Msun). The blue-shifted H-alpha emission relative to the hosts for all three events may be in tension with the binary star model proposed for iPTF13ehe. Finally, iPTF15esb has a peculiar light curve with three peaks separated from one another by ~ 22 days. The LC undulation is higher in bluer bands. One possible explanation is eject-CSM interaction.
  • It is known that some active galactic nuclei (AGNs) transited from type 1 to type 2 or vice versa. There are two explanations for the so-called changing look AGNs: one is the dramatic change of the obscuration along the line-of-sight, the other is the variation of accretion rate. In this paper, we report the detection of large amplitude variations in the mid-infrared luminosity during the transitions in 10 changing look AGNs using WISE and newly released NEOWISE-R data. The mid-infrared light curves of 10 objects echoes the variability in the optical band with a time lag expected for dust reprocessing. The large variability amplitude is inconsistent with the scenario of varying obscuration, rather supports the scheme of dramatic change in the accretion rate.
  • Recent studies have found a significant evolution and scatter in the IRX-$\beta$ relation at z > 4, suggesting different dust properties of these galaxies. The total far-infrared (FIR) luminosity is key for this analysis but poorly constrained in normal (main-sequence) star-forming z > 5 galaxies where often only one single FIR point is available. To better inform estimates of the FIR luminosity, we construct a sample of local galaxies and three low-redshift analogs of z > 5 systems. The trends in this sample suggest that normal high-redshift galaxies have a warmer infrared (IR) SED compared to average z < 4 galaxies that are used as prior in these studies. The blue-shifted peak and mid-IR excess emission could be explained by a combination of a larger fraction of the metal-poor inter-stellar medium (ISM) being optically thin to ultra-violet (UV) light and a stronger UV radiation field due to high star formation densities. Assuming a maximally warm IR SED suggests 0.6 dex increased total FIR luminosities, which removes some tension between dust attenuation models and observations of the IRX-$\beta$ relation at z > 5. Despite this, some galaxies still fall below the minimum IRX-$\beta$ relation derived with standard dust cloud models. We propose that radiation pressure in these highly star-forming galaxies causes a spatial offset between dust clouds and young star-forming regions within the lifetime of O/B stars. These offsets change the radiation balance and create viewing-angle effects that can change UV colors at fixed IRX. We provide a modified model that can explain the location of these galaxies on the IRX-$\beta$ diagram.
  • At $z=1-3$, the formation of new stars is dominated by dusty galaxies whose far-IR emission indicates they contain colder dust than local galaxies of a similar luminosity. We explore the reasons for the evolving IR emission of similar galaxies over cosmic time using: 1) Local galaxies from GOALS $(L_{\rm IR}=10^{11}-10^{12}\,L_\odot)$; 2) Galaxies at $z\sim0.1-0.5$ from the 5MUSES ($L_{\rm IR}=10^{10}-10^{12}\,L_\odot$); 3) IR luminous galaxies spanning $z=0.5-3$ from GOODS and Spitzer xFLS ($L_{\rm IR}>10^{11}\,L_\odot$). All samples have Spitzer mid-IR spectra, and Herschel and ground-based submillimeter imaging covering the full IR spectral energy distribution, allowing us to robustly measure $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}$, $T_{\rm dust}$, and $M_{\rm dust}$ for every galaxy. Despite similar infrared luminosities, $z>0.5$ dusty star forming galaxies have a factor of 5 higher dust masses and 5K colder temperatures. The increase in dust mass is linked with an increase in the gas fractions with redshift, and we do not observe a similar increase in stellar mass or star formation efficiency. $L_{160}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/L_{70}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}$, a proxy for $T_{\rm dust}$, is strongly correlated with $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/M_{\rm dust}$ independently of redshift. We measure merger classification and galaxy size for a subsample, and there is no obvious correlation between these parameters and $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm \scriptscriptstyle SF}/M_{\rm dust}$ or $L_{160}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/L_{70}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}$. In dusty star forming galaxies, the change in $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm\scriptscriptstyle SF}/M_{\rm dust}$ can fully account for the observed colder dust temperatures, suggesting that any change in the spatial extent of the interstellar medium is a second order effect.
  • We present the mid-infrared (MIR) light curves (LCs) of a tidal disruption event (TDE) candidate in the center of a nearby ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) F01004-2237 using archival {\it WISE} and {\it NEOWISE} data from 2010 to 2016. At the peak of the optical flare, F01004-2237 was IR quiescent. About three years later, its MIR fluxes have shown a steady increase, rising by 1.34 and 1.04 mag in $3.4$ and $4.6\mu$m up to the end of 2016. The host-subtracted MIR peak luminosity is $2-3\times10^{44}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$. We interpret the MIR LCs as an infrared echo, i.e. dust reprocessed emission of the optical flare. Fitting the MIR LCs using our dust model, we infer a dust torus of the size of a few parsecs at some inclined angle. The derived dust temperatures range from $590-850$\,K, and the warm dust mass is $\sim7\,M_{\odot}$. Such a large mass implies that the dust cannot be newly formed. We also derive the UV luminosity of $4-11\times10^{44}$\,erg\,s$^{-1}$. The inferred total IR energy is $1-2\times10^{52}$\,erg, suggesting a large dust covering factor. Finally, our dust model suggests that the long tail of the optical flare could be due to dust scattering.
  • We report the discovery by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) iPTF16axa at $z=0.108$, and present its broadband photometric and spectroscopic evolution from 3 months of follow-up observations with ground-based telescopes and Swift. The light curve is well fitted with a $t^{-5/3}$ decay, and we constrain the rise-time to peak to be $<$49 rest-frame days after disruption, which is roughly consistent with the fallback timescale expected for the $\sim 5\times$10$^{6}$ $M_\odot$ black hole inferred from the stellar velocity dispersion of the host galaxy. The UV and optical spectral energy distribution (SED) is well described by a constant blackbody temperature of T$\sim$ 3$\times$10$^4$ K over the monitoring period, with an observed peak luminosity of 1.1$\times$10$^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The optical spectra are characterized by a strong blue continuum and broad HeII and H$\alpha$ lines characteristic of TDEs. We compare the photometric and spectroscopic signatures of iPTF16axa with 11 TDE candidates in the literature with well-sampled optical light curves. Based on a single-temperature fit to the optical and near-UV photometry, most of these TDE candidates have peak luminosities confined between log(L [erg s$^{-1}$]) = 43.4-44.4, with constant temperatures of a few $\times 10^{4}$ K during their power-law declines, implying blackbody radii on the order of ten times the tidal disruption radius, that decrease monotonically with time. For TDE candidates with hydrogen and helium emission, the high helium-to-hydrogen ratios suggest that the emission arises from high-density gas, where nebular arguments break down. We find no correlation between the peak luminosity and the black hole mass, contrary to the expectations for TDEs to have $\dot{M} \propto M_{\rm BH}^{-1/2}$.
  • Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are the most luminous supernovae in the universe. They are found in extreme star-forming galaxies and are probably connected with the death of massive stars. One hallmark of very massive progenitors would be a tendency to explode in very dense, UV-bright, and blue regions. In this paper we investigate the resolved host galaxy properties of two nearby hydrogen-poor SLSNe, PTF~11hrq and PTF~12dam. For both galaxies \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} multi-filter images were obtained. Additionally, we performe integral field spectroscopy of the host galaxy of PTF~11hrq using the Very Large Telescope Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT/MUSE), and investigate the line strength, metallicity and kinematics. Neither PTF~11hrq nor PTF~12dam occurred in the bluest part of their host galaxies, although both galaxies have overall blue UV-to-optical colors. The MUSE data reveal a bright starbursting region in the host of PTF~11hrq, although far from the SN location. The SN exploded close to a region with disturbed kinematics, bluer color, stronger [OIII], and lower metallicity. The host galaxy is likely interacting with a companion. PTF~12dam occurred in one of the brightest pixels, in a starbursting galaxy with a complex morphology and a tidal tail, where interaction is also very likely. We speculate that SLSN explosions may originate from stars generated during star-formation episodes triggered by interaction. High resolution imaging and integral field spectroscopy are fundamental for a better understanding of SLSNe explosion sites and how star formation varies across their host galaxies.
  • We report the first maximum-light far-Ultraviolet to near-infrared spectra (1000A - 1.62um, rest) of a H-poor superluminous supernova, Gaia16apd. At z=0.1018, it is one of the closest and the UV brightest such events, with 17.4 (AB) magnitude in Swift UV band (1928A) at -11days pre-maximum. Assuming an exponential form, we derived the rise time of 33days and the peak bolometric luminosity of 3x10^{44}ergs^-1. At maximum light, the estimated photospheric temperature and velocity are 17,000K and 14,000kms^-1 respectively. The inferred radiative and kinetic energy are roughly 1x10^{51} and 2x10^{52}erg. Gaia16apd is extremely UV luminous, emitting 50% of its total luminosity at 1000 - 2500A. Compared to the UV spectra (normalized at 3100A) of well studied SN1992A (Ia), SN2011fe(Ia), SN1999em (IIP) and SN1993J (IIb), it has orders of magnitude more far-UV emission. This excess is interpreted primarily as a result of weaker metal line blanketing due to much lower abundance of iron-group elements in the outer ejecta. Because these elements originate either from the natal metallicity of the star, or have been newly produced, our observation provides direct evidence that little of these freshly synthesized material, including 56Ni, was mixed into the outer ejecta, and the progenitor metallicity is likely sub-solar. This disfavors Pair-Instability Supernova (PISN) models with Helium core masses >=90Msun, where substantial 56Ni material is produced. Higher photospheric temperature of Gaia16apd than that of normal SNe may also contribute to the observed far-UV excess. We find some indication that UV luminous SLSNe-I like Gaia16apd could be common. Using the UV spectra, we show that WFIRST could detect SLSNe-I out to redshift of 8.
  • We present the Palomar Transient Factory discoveries and the photometric and spectroscopic observations of PTF11kmb and PTF12bho. We show that both transients have properties consistent with the class of calcium-rich gap transients, specifically lower peak luminosities and rapid evolution compared to ordinary supernovae, and a nebular spectrum dominated by [Ca II] emission. A striking feature of both transients is their host environments: PTF12bho is an intra-cluster transient in the Coma Cluster, while PTF11kmb is located in a loose galaxy group, at a physical offset ~150 kpc from the most likely host galaxy. Deep Subaru imaging of PTF12bho rules out an underlying host system to a limit of $M_R > -8.0$ mag, while Hubble Space Telescope imaging of PTF11kmb reveals a marginal counterpart that, if real, could be either a background galaxy or a globular cluster. We show that the offset distribution of Ca-rich gap transients is significantly more extreme than that seen for Type Ia supernovae or even short-hard gamma-ray bursts (sGRBs). Thus, if the offsets are caused by a kick, they require larger kick velocities and/or longer merger times than sGRBs. We also show that almost all Ca-rich gap transients found to date are in group and cluster environments with elliptical host galaxies, indicating a very old progenitor population; the remote locations could partially be explained by these environments having the largest fraction of stars in the intra-group/intra-cluster light following galaxy-galaxy interactions.
  • The James Webb Space Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrometer (MRS), will offer nearly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in sensitivity and >3X improvement in spectral resolution over our previous space-based mid-IR spectrometer, the Spitzer IRS. In this paper, we make predictions for spectroscopic pointed observations and serendipitous detections with the MRS. Specifically, pointed observations of Herschel sources require only a few minutes on source integration for detections of several star-forming and active galactic nucleus lines, out to z$=$3 and beyond. But the same data will also include tens of serendipitous 0$\lesssim$z$\lesssim$4 galaxies per field with infrared luminosities ranging $\sim10^6-10^{13}$L$_{\odot}$. In particular, for the first time and for free we will be able to explore the $L_{IR}<10^{9}L_{\odot}$ regime out to $z\sim3$. We estimate that with $\sim$100 such fields, statistics of these detections will be sufficient to constrain the evolution of the low-$L$ end of the infrared luminosity function, and hence the star formation rate function. The above conclusions hold for a wide range in potential low-$L$ end of the IR luminosity function, and accounting for the PAH deficit in low-$L$, low-metallicity galaxies.
  • We present a radio-quiet quasar at z=0.237 discovered "turning on" by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). The transient, iPTF 16bco, was detected by iPTF in the nucleus of a galaxy with an archival SDSS spectrum with weak narrow-line emission characteristic of a low-ionization emission line region (LINER). Our follow-up spectra show the dramatic appearance of broad Balmer lines and a power-law continuum characteristic of a luminous (L_bol~10^45 erg/s) type 1 quasar 12 years later. Our photometric monitoring with PTF from 2009-2012, and serendipitous X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey in 2011 and 2015, constrain the change of state to have occurred less than 500 days before the iPTF detection. An enhanced broad Halpha to [OIII]5007 line ratio in the type 1 state relative to other changing-look quasars also is suggestive of the most rapid change of state yet observed in a quasar. We argue that the >10 increase in Eddington ratio inferred from the brightening in UV and X-ray continuum flux is more likely due to an intrinsic change in the accretion rate of a pre-existing accretion disk, than an external mechanism such as variable obscuration, microlensing, or the tidal disruption of a star. However, further monitoring will be helpful in better constraining the mechanism driving this change of state. The rapid "turn on" of the quasar is much shorter than the viscous infall timescale of an accretion disk, and requires a disk instability that can develop around a ~10^8 M_sun black hole on timescales less than a year.
  • We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) PTF12dam and iPTF13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF12dam is very similar in duration (~10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2-3 mag fainter) compared to those observed in other SLSNe-I. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time light-curve decline in both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni and $^{56}$Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the iPTF13dcc light curve. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF12dam and iPTF13dcc can be adequately fit with the circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model.
  • We present, for the first time, the local [CII] 158 um emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). [CII] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-IR luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S_60 um > 5.24 Jy. We calculated the completeness as a function of [CII] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [CII] luminosity function is constrained in the range ~10^(7-9) (Lo) from both the 1/V_max and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [CII] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [CII] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [CII]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [CII] high redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions are suggestive of an evolution in the [CII] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. Deep surveys using ALMA with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.
  • We present ultraviolet through near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the host galaxies of all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory prior to 2013, and derive measurements of their luminosities, star-formation rates, stellar masses, and gas-phase metallicities. We find that Type I (hydrogen-poor) SLSNe are found almost exclusively in low-mass (M < 2x10^9 M_sun) and metal-poor (12+log[O/H] < 8.4) galaxies. We compare the mass and metallicity distributions of our sample to nearby galaxy catalogs in detail and conclude that the rate of SLSNe-I as a fraction of all SNe is heavily suppressed in galaxies with metallicities >0.5 Z_sun. Extremely low metallicities are not required, and indeed provide no further increase in the relative SLSN rate. Several SLSN-I hosts are undergoing vigorous starbursts, but this may simply be a side effect of metallicity dependence: dwarf galaxies tend to have bursty star-formation histories. Type-II (hydrogen-rich) SLSNe are found over the entire range of galaxy masses and metallicities, and their integrated properties do not suggest a strong preference for (or against) low-mass/low-metallicity galaxies. Two hosts exhibit unusual properties: PTF 10uhf is a Type I SLSN in a massive, luminous infrared galaxy at redshift z=0.29, while PTF 10tpz is a Type II SLSN located in the nucleus of an early-type host at z=0.04.
  • We describe the near real-time transient-source discovery engine for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), currently in operations at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), Caltech. We coin this system the IPAC/iPTF Discovery Engine (or IDE). We review the algorithms used for PSF-matching, image subtraction, detection, photometry, and machine-learned (ML) vetting of extracted transient candidates. We also review the performance of our ML classifier. For a limiting signal-to-noise ratio of 4 in relatively unconfused regions, "bogus" candidates from processing artifacts and imperfect image subtractions outnumber real transients by ~ 10:1. This can be considerably higher for image data with inaccurate astrometric and/or PSF-matching solutions. Despite this occasionally high contamination rate, the ML classifier is able to identify real transients with an efficiency (or completeness) of ~ 97% for a maximum tolerable false-positive rate of 1% when classifying raw candidates. All subtraction-image metrics, source features, ML probability-based real-bogus scores, contextual metadata from other surveys, and possible associations with known Solar System objects are stored in a relational database for retrieval by the various science working groups. We review our efforts in mitigating false-positives and our experience in optimizing the overall system in response to the multitude of science projects underway with iPTF.
  • A key question in extragalactic studies is the determination of the relative roles of stars and AGN in powering dusty galaxies at $z\sim$1-3 where the bulk of star-formation and AGN activity took place. In Paper I, we present a sample of $336$ 24$\mu$m-selected (Ultra)Luminous Infrared Galaxies, (U)LIRGs, at $z \sim 0.3$-$2.8$, where we focus on determining the AGN contribution to the IR luminosity. Here, we use hydrodynamic simulations with dust radiative transfer of isolated and merging galaxies, to investigate how well the simulations reproduce our empirical IR AGN fraction estimates and determine how IR AGN fractions relate to the UV-mm AGN fraction. We find that: 1) IR AGN fraction estimates based on simulations are in qualitative agreement with the empirical values when host reprocessing of the AGN light is considered; 2) for star-forming galaxy-AGN composites our empirical methods may be underestimating the role of AGN, as our simulations imply $>$50% AGN fractions, $\sim$3$\times$ higher than previous estimates; 3) 6% of our empirically classified "SFG" have AGN fractions $\gtrsim$50%. While this is a small percentage of SFGs, if confirmed, would imply the true number density of AGN may be underestimated; 4) this comparison depends on the adopted AGN template -- those that neglect the contribution of warm dust lower the empirical fractions by up to 2$\times$; and 5) the IR AGN fraction is only a good proxy for the intrinsic UV-mm AGN fraction when the extinction is high ($A_V\gtrsim 1$ or up to and including coalescence in a merger).
  • While optical and radio transient surveys have enjoyed a renaissance over the past decade, the dynamic infrared sky remains virtually unexplored. The infrared is a powerful tool for probing transient events in dusty regions that have high optical extinction, and for detecting the coolest of stars that are bright only at these wavelengths. The fundamental roadblocks in studying the infrared time-domain have been the overwhelmingly bright sky background (250 times brighter than optical) and the narrow field-of-view of infrared cameras (largest is 0.6 sq deg). To begin to address these challenges and open a new observational window in the infrared, we present Palomar Gattini-IR: a 25 sq degree, 300mm aperture, infrared telescope at Palomar Observatory that surveys the entire accessible sky (20,000 sq deg) to a depth of 16.4 AB mag (J band, 1.25um) every night. Palomar Gattini-IR is wider in area than every existing infrared camera by more than a factor of 40 and is able to survey large areas of sky multiple times. We anticipate the potential for otherwise infeasible discoveries, including, for example, the elusive electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave detections. With dedicated hardware in hand, and a F/1.44 telescope available commercially and cost-effectively, Palomar Gattini-IR will be on-sky in early 2017 and will survey the entire accessible sky every night for two years. Palomar Gattini-IR will pave the way for a dual hemisphere, infrared-optimized, ultra-wide field high cadence machine called Turbo Gattini-IR. To take advantage of the low sky background at 2.5 um, two identical systems will be located at the polar sites of the South Pole, Antarctica and near Eureka on Ellesmere Island, Canada. Turbo Gattini-IR will survey 15,000 sq. degrees to a depth of 20AB, the same depth of the VISTA VHS survey, every 2 hours with a survey efficiency of 97%.
  • We present a study of interstellar medium in the host galaxies of 9 QSOs at 0.1<z<0.2 with blackhole masses of $3\times10^7\,M_\odot$ to $3\times10^9\,M_\odot$ based on the far-IR spectroscopy taken with {\it Herschel Space Observatory}. We detect the [OI]63$\mu$m ([CII]158$\mu$m) emission in 6(8) out of 8(9) sources. Our QSO sample has far-infrared luminosities (LFIR)~several times $10^{11}L_\odot$. The observed line-to-LFIR ratios (LOI/LFIR and LCII/LFIR) are in the ranges of $2.6\times10^{-4}$-$10^{-2}$ and $2.8\times10^{-4}$-$2\times10^{-3}$ respectively (including upper limits). These ratios are comparable to the values found in local ULIRGs, but higher than the average value published so far for $z$$>$1 IR bright QSOs. One target, W0752+19, shows an additional broad velocity component (~720 km/s), and exceptionally strong [OI]63$\mu$m emission with LOI/LFIR of $10^{-2}$, an order of magnitude higher than that of average value found among local (U)LIRGs. Combining with the analyses of the {\it SDSS} optical spectra, we conclude that the [OI]63$\mu$m emission in these QSOs is unlikely excited by shocks. We infer that the broad [OI]63 micron emission in W0752+19 could arise from the warm and dense ISM in the narrow line region of the central AGN. Another possible explanation is the existence of a dense gas outflow with $n_{\rm H}\sim10^4$\,cm$^{-3}$, where the corresponding broad [CII] emission is suppressed. Based on the far-IR [OI] and [CII] line ratios, we estimate the constraints on the ISM density and UV radiation field intensity of $n_{\rm H} \lesssim 10^{3.3}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $10^3<G_0 \lesssim 10^{4.2}$, respectively. These values are consistent with those found in local Seyfert 1 ULIRGs. In contrast, the gas with broad velocity width in W0752+19 has $n_{\rm H} \gtrsim 10^{4.3}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $G_0>10^4$.