• We introduce a new method for performing robust Bayesian estimation of the three-dimensional spatial power spectrum at the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), from interferometric observations. The versatility of this technique allows us to present two approaches. First, when the observations span only a small number of independent spatial frequencies ($k$-modes) we sample directly from the spherical power spectrum coefficients that describe the EoR signal realisation. Second, when the number of $k$-modes to be included in the model becomes large, we sample from the joint probability density of the spherical power spectrum and the signal coefficients, using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods to explore this high dimensional ($\sim$ 20000) space efficiently. This approach has been successfully applied to simulated observations that include astrophysically realistic foregrounds in a companion publication (Sims et al. 2016). Here we focus on explaining the methodology in detail, and use simple foreground models to both demonstrate its efficacy, and highlight salient features. In particular, we show that including an arbitrary flat spectrum continuum foreground that is $10^8$ times greater in power than the EoR signal has no detectable impact on our parameter estimates of the EoR power spectrum recovered from the data.
  • We present an extremely deep CO(1-0) observation of a confirmed $z=1.62$ galaxy cluster. We detect two spectroscopically confirmed cluster members in CO(1-0) with $S/N>5$. Both galaxies have log(${\cal M_{\star}}$/\msol)$>11$ and are gas rich, with ${\cal M}_{\rm mol}$/(${\cal M_{\star}}+{\cal M}_{\rm mol}$)$\sim 0.17-0.45$. One of these galaxies lies on the star formation rate (SFR)-${\cal M_{\star}}$ sequence while the other lies an order of magnitude below. We compare the cluster galaxies to other SFR-selected galaxies with CO measurements and find that they have CO luminosities consistent with expectations given their infrared luminosities. We also find that they have comparable gas fractions and star formation efficiencies (SFE) to what is expected from published field galaxy scaling relations. The galaxies are compact in their stellar light distribution, at the extreme end for all high redshift star-forming galaxies. However, their SFE is consistent with other field galaxies at comparable compactness. This is similar to two other sources selected in a blind CO survey of the HDF-N. Despite living in a highly quenched proto-cluster core, the molecular gas properties of these two galaxies, one of which may be in the processes of quenching, appear entirely consistent with field scaling relations between the molecular gas content, stellar mass, star formation rate, and redshift. We speculate that these cluster galaxies cannot have any further substantive gas accretion if they are to become members of the dominant passive population in $z<1$ clusters.
  • We construct foreground simulations comprising spatially correlated extragalactic and diffuse Galactic emission components and calculate the `intrinsic' (instrument-free) two-dimensional spatial power spectrum and the cylindrically and spherically averaged three-dimensional k-space power spectra of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and our foreground simulations using a Bayesian power spectral estimation framework. This leads us to identify a model dependent region of optimal signal estimation for our foreground and EoR models, within which the spatial power in the EoR signal relative to foregrounds is maximised. We identify a target field dependent region, in k-space, of intrinsic foreground power spectral contamination at low k_perp and k_parallel and a transition to a relatively foreground-free intrinsic EoR window in the complement to this region. The contaminated region of k-space demonstrates that simultaneous estimation of the EoR and foregrounds is important for obtaining statistically robust estimates of the EoR power spectrum; biased results will be obtained from methodologies that ignore their covariance. Using simulated observations with frequency dependent uv-coverage and primary beam, with the former derived for HERA in 37-antenna and 331-antenna configuration, we recover instrumental power spectra consistent with their intrinsic counterparts. We discuss the implications of these results for optimal strategies for unbiased estimation of the EoR power spectrum.
  • We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • We introduce a method for performing a robust Bayesian analysis of non-Gaussianity present in pulsar timing data, simultaneously with the pulsar timing model, and additional stochastic parameters such as those describing red spin noise and dispersion measure variations. The parameters used to define the presence of non-Gaussianity are zero for Gaussian processes, giving a simple method of defining the strength of non-Gaussian behaviour. We use simulations to show that assuming Gaussian statistics when the noise in the data is drawn from a non-Gaussian distribution can significantly increase the uncertainties associated with the pulsar timing model parameters. We then apply the method to the publicly available 15 year Parkes Pulsar Timing Array data release 1 dataset for the binary pulsar J0437$-$4715. In this analysis we present a significant detection of non-Gaussianity in the uncorrelated non-thermal noise, but we find that it does not yet impact the timing model or stochastic parameter estimates significantly compared to analysis performed assuming Gaussian statistics. The methods presented are, however, shown to be of immediate practical use for current European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) and International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) datasets.
  • A new Bayesian method for performing an image domain search for line-emitting galaxies is presented. The method uses both spatial and spectral information to robustly determine the source properties, employing either simple Gaussian, or other physically motivated models whilst using the evidence to determine the probability that the source is real. In this paper, we describe the method, and its application to both a simulated data set, and a blind survey for cold molecular gas using observations of the Hubble Deep Field North taken with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We make a total of 6 robust detections in the survey, 5 of which have counterparts in other observing bands. We identify the most secure detections found in a previous investigation, while finding one new probable line source with an optical ID not seen in the previous analysis. This study acts as a pilot application of Bayesian statistics to future searches to be carried out both for low-$J$ CO transitions of high redshift galaxies using the JVLA, and at millimeter wavelengths with ALMA, enabling the inference of robust scientific conclusions about the history of the molecular gas properties of star-forming galaxies in the Universe through cosmic time.
  • Here we present a Bayesian method of including discrete measurements of dispersion measure due to the interstellar medium in the direction of a pulsar as prior information in the analysis of that pulsar. We use a simple simulation to show the efficacy of this method, where the inclusion of the additional measurements results in both a significant increase in the precision with which the timing model parameters can be obtained, and an improved upper limit on the amplitude of any red noise in the dataset. We show that this method can be applied where no multi-frequency data exists across much of the dataset, and where there is no simultaneous multi-frequency data for any given observing epoch. Including such information in the analysis of upcoming International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) and European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) data releases could therefore prove invaluable in obtaining the most constraining limits on gravitational wave signals within those datasets.
  • A new Bayesian software package for the analysis of pulsar timing data is presented in the form of TempoNest which allows for the robust determination of the non-linear pulsar timing solution simultaneously with a range of additional stochastic parameters. This includes both red spin noise and dispersion measure variations using either power law descriptions of the noise, or through a model-independent method that parameterises the power at individual frequencies in the signal. We use TempoNest to show that at noise levels representative of current datasets in the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) and International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) the linear timing model can underestimate the uncertainties of the timing solution by up to an order of magnitude. We also show how to perform Bayesian model selection between different sets of timing model and stochastic parameters, for example, by demonstrating that in the pulsar B1937+21 both the dispersion measure variations and spin noise in the data are optimally modelled by simple power laws. Finally we show that not including the stochastic parameters simultaneously with the timing model can lead to unpredictable variation in the estimated uncertainties, compromising the robustness of the scientific results extracted from such analysis.
  • We present ALMA observations of the [C II] 158 micron fine structure line and dust continuum emission from the host galaxies of five redshift 6 quasars. We also report complementary observations of 250 GHz dust continuum and CO (6-5) line emission from the z=6.00 quasar SDSS J231038.88+185519.7. The ALMA observations were carried out in the extended array at 0.7" resolution. We have detected the line and dust continuum in all five objects. The derived [C II] line luminosities are 1.6x10^{9} to 8.8x10^{9} Lsun and the [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratios are 3.0-5.6x10^{-4}, which is comparable to the values found in other high-redshift quasar-starburst systems and local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. The sources are marginally resolved and the intrinsic source sizes (major axis FWHM) are constrained to be 0.3" to 0.6" (i.e., 1.7 to 3.5 kpc) for the [C II] line emission and 0.2" to 0.4" (i.e., 1.2 to 2.3 kpc) for the continuum. These measurements indicate that there is vigorous star formation over the central few kpc in the quasar host galaxies. The ALMA observations also constrain the dynamical properties of the atomic gas in the starburst nuclei. The intensity-weighted velocity maps of three sources show clear velocity gradients. Such velocity gradients are consistent with a rotating, gravitationally bound gas component, although they are not uniquely interpreted as such. Under the simplifying assumption of rotation, the implied dynamical masses within the [C II]-emitting regions are of order 10^{10} to 10^{11} Msun. Given these estimates, the mass ratios between the SMBHs and the spheroidal bulge are an order of magnitude higher than the mean value found in local spheroidal galaxies, which is in agreement with results from previous CO observations of high redshift quasars.
  • A new model independent method is presented for the analysis of pulsar timing data and the estimation of the spectral properties of an isotropic gravitational wave background (GWB). We show that by rephrasing the likelihood we are able to eliminate the most costly aspects of computation normally associated with this type of data analysis. When applied to the International Pulsar Timing Array Mock Data Challenge data sets this results in speedups of approximately 2 to 3 orders of magnitude compared to established methods. We present three applications of the new likelihood. In the low signal to noise regime we sample directly from the power spectrum coefficients of the GWB signal realization. In the high signal to noise regime, where the data can support a large number of coefficients, we sample from the joint probability density of the power spectrum coefficients for the individual pulsars and the GWB signal realization. Critically in both these cases we need make no assumptions about the form of the power spectrum of the GWB, or the individual pulsars. Finally we present a method for characterizing the spatial correlation between pulsars on the sky, making no assumptions about the form of that correlation, and therefore providing the only truly general Bayesian method of confirming a GWB detection from pulsar timing data.
  • We use sensitive observations of three high redshift sources; [CII] fine structure and CO(2-1) rotational transitions for the z=6.4 Quasar host galaxy (QSO) J1148+5251, and [CII] and CO(5-4) transitions from the QSO BR1202-0725 and its sub-millimeter companion (SMG) galaxy at z=4.7. We use these observations to place constraints on the quantity Dz = z(CO) - z(CII) for each source where z(CO) and z(CII) are the observed redshifts of the CO rotational transition and [CII] fine structure transition respectively, using a combination of approaches; 1) By modelling the emission line profiles using `shapelets' to compare both the emission redshifts and the line profiles themselves, in order to make inferences about the intrinsic velocity differences between the molecular and atomic gas, and 2) By performing a marginalisation over all model parameters in order to calculate a non-parametric estimate of Dz. We derive 99% confidence intervals for the marginalised posterior of Dz of (-1.9 pm 1.3) x10^-3, (-3 pm 8) x10^-4 and (-2 pm 4) x10^-3 for J1148+5251, and the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively. We show the [CII] and CO(2-1) line profiles for J1148+5251 are consistent with each other within the limits of the data, whilst the [CII] and CO(5-4) line profiles from the BR1202-0725 QSO and SMG respectively have 65 and >99.9% probabilities of being inconsistent, with the CO(5-4) lines ~ 30% wider than the [CII] lines. Therefore whilst the observed values of Dz can correspond to variations in the quantity Delta F/F with cosmic time, where F=alpha^2/mu, with alpha the fine structure constant, and mu the proton-to-electron mass ratio, of both (-3.3 pm 2.3) x10^-4 for a look back time of 12.9 Gyr and of (-5 pm 15) x10^-5 for a look back time of 12.4 Gyr we propose that they are the result of the two species of gas being spatially separated as indicated by the inconsistencies in their line profiles.