• Large non-saturating magnetoresistance has been observed in various materials and electron-hole compensation has been regarded as one of the main mechanisms. Here we present a detailed study of angle-dependent Shubnikov-de Hass effect on large magnetoresistance material pyrite-type PtBi$_{2}$, which allows us to experimentally reconstruct its Fermi-surface structure and extract physical properties of each pocket. We find its Fermi surface contains four types of pockets in the Brillouin zone: three ellipsoid-like hole pockets $\alpha$ with c4 symmetry located on the edges (M points), one intricate electron pocket $\beta$ merged from four ellipsoids along [111] located on the corners (R points), two smooth and cambered octahedrons $\gamma$ (electron) and $\delta$ (hole) on the center ($\Gamma$ point). The deduced carrier densities of electrons and holes from the volume of pockets prove nearly perfect compensation. This compensation at low temperatures is also supported by our two bands by fitting field-dependence of Hall and magnetoresistance at different temperatures. We conclude that the compensation is the main mechanism for the large non-saturating magnetoresistance in pyrite-type PtBi$_{2}$. We found the hole pockets $\alpha$ may contribute major mobility because of their light masses and anisotropy to avoid large-angle scattering at low temperature, may point to common features of semimetals with large magnetoresistance. The found and sub-quadratic magnetoresistance is probably due to field-dependent mobilities induced by long-range disorders, another feature of semimetal under high magnetic fields.
  • Giant quantum oscillations of magneto-thermal conductivity amounting to two orders of magnitude of the estimation based on the Wiedemann-Franz law have been observed in the prototypical Weyl semimetal TaAs. The characteristic oscillation frequency ($F$ $\approx$ 7 T) agrees well with that confirmed for a small hole-type Fermi pocket enclosing a Weyl node. A comparative analysis of various potential scenarios suggests a significant electron-phonon coupling that strongly modulates the phonon mean free path through Landau quantization of the electronic density of states to be at the heart. Resembling the chiral-anomaly induced positive magneto-electrical conductivity, an increase of the thermal conductivity in parallel magnetic field has also been observed. Our findings pose the question whether these are characteristic also for other recently discovered topological electronic materials, calling for more intensive investigations along this line.
  • High-temperature superconductivity is closely adjacent to a long-range antiferromagnet, which is called a parent compound. In cuprates, all parent compounds are alike and carrier doping leads to superconductivity, so a unified phase diagram can be drawn. However, the properties of parent compounds for iron-based superconductors show significant diversity and both carrier and isovalent dopings can cause superconductivity, which casts doubt on the idea that there exists a unified phase diagram for them. Here we show that the ordered moments in a variety of iron pnictides are inversely proportional to the effective Curie constants of their nematic susceptibility. This unexpected scaling behavior suggests that the magnetic ground states of iron pnictides can be achieved by tuning the strength of nematic fluctuations. Therefore, a unified phase diagram can be established where superconductivity emerges from a hypothetical parent compound with a large ordered moment but weak nematic fluctuations, which suggests that iron-based superconductors are strongly correlated electron systems.
  • HoTe$_{3}$, a member of the rare-earth tritelluride ($R$Te$_{3}$) family, and its Pd-intercalated compounds, Pd$_x$HoTe$_{3}$, where superconductivity (SC) sets in as the charge-density wave (CDW) transition is suppressed by the intercalation of a small amount of Pd, are investigated using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and electrical resistivity. Two incommensurate CDWs with perpendicular nesting vectors are observed in HoTe$_{3}$ at low temperatures. With a slight Pd intercalation ($x$ = 0.01), the large CDW gap decreases and the small one increases. The momentum dependence of the gaps along the inner Fermi surface (FS) evolves from orthorhombicity to near tetragonality, manifesting the competition between two CDW orders. At $x$ = 0.02, both CDW gaps decreases with the emergence of SC. Further increasing the content of Pd for $x$ = 0.04 will completely suppress the CDW instabilities and give rise to the maximal SC order. The evolution of the electronic structures and electron-phonon couplings (EPCs) of the multiple CDWs upon Pd intercalation are carefully scrutinized. We discuss the interplay between multiple CDW orders, and the competition between CDW and SC in detail.
  • We use inelastic neutron scattering to study temperature and energy dependence of spin excitations in optimally P-doped BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 superconductor (Tc = 30 K) throughout the Brillouin zone. In the undoped state, spin waves and paramagnetic spin excitations of BaFe2As2 stem from antiferromagnetic (AF) ordering wave vector QAF= (1/-1,0) and peaks near zone boundary at (1/-1,1/-1) around 180 meV. Replacing 30% As by smaller P to induce superconductivity, low-energy spin excitations of BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2form a resonance in the superconducting state and high-energy spin excitations now peaks around 220 meV near (1/-1,1/-1). These results are consistent with calculations from a combined density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory, and suggest that the decreased average pnictogen height in BaFe2(As0.7P0.3)2 reduces the strength of electron correlations and increases the effective bandwidth of magnetic excitations.
  • The topological materials have attracted much attention recently. While three-dimensional topological insulators are becoming abundant, two-dimensional topological insulators remain rare, particularly in natural materials. ZrTe5 has host a long-standing puzzle on its anomalous transport properties; its underlying origin remains elusive. Lately, ZrTe5 has ignited renewed interest because it is predicted that single-layer ZrTe5 is a two-dimensional topological insulator and there is possibly a topological phase transition in bulk ZrTe5. However, the topological nature of ZrTe5 is under debate as some experiments point to its being a three-dimensional or quasi-two-dimensional Dirac semimetal. Here we report high-resolution laser-based angle-resolved photoemission measurements on ZrTe5. The electronic property of ZrTe5 is dominated by two branches of nearly-linear-dispersion bands at the Brillouin zone center. These two bands are separated by an energy gap that decreases with decreasing temperature but persists down to the lowest temperature we measured (~2 K). The overall electronic structure exhibits a dramatic temperature dependence; it evolves from a p-type semimetal with a hole-like Fermi pocket at high temperature, to a semiconductor around ~135 K where its resistivity exhibits a peak, to an n-type semimetal with an electron-like Fermi pocket at low temperature. These results indicate a clear electronic evidence of the temperature-induced Lifshitz transition in ZrTe5. They provide a natural understanding on the underlying origin of the resistivity anomaly at ~135 K and its associated reversal of the charge carrier type. Our observations also provide key information on deciphering the topological nature of ZrTe5 and possible temperature-induced topological phase transition.
  • Weyl semi-metal is the three dimensional analog of graphene. According to the quantum field theory, the appearance of Weyl points near the Fermi level will cause novel transport phenomena related to chiral anomaly. In the present paper, we report the first experimental evidence for the long-anticipated negative magneto-resistance generated by the chiral anomaly in a newly predicted time-reversal invariant Weyl semi-metal material TaAs. Clear Shubnikov de Haas oscillations (SdH) have been detected starting from very weak magnetic field. Analysis of the SdH peaks gives the Berry phase accumulated along the cyclotron orbits to be {\pi}, indicating the existence of Weyl points.