• The VST Optical Imaging of the CDFS and ES1 Fields (VOICE) Survey is a VST INAF Guaranteed Time program proposed to provide deep optical imaging covering two 4 deg$^2$ cosmic windows. We present the cosmic shear measurement over four 1 deg$^2$ fields in the CDFS region in the $r$-band using LensFit. Each tile has more than one hundred exposures to reach deep imaging. More than 50 exposures of each tile passed image quality selection criteria for weak lensing study. The $r$-band co-added image reaches $5\sigma$ limiting magnitude $r = 26.1$ for point sources, which is 1.2 mag deeper than KiDS The photometric redshifts are estimated using the VOICE $u,g,r,i$ together with near-infrared VIDEO data $Y,J,H,K_s$. The mean redshift of the shear catalogue is 0.87 considering shear weight. The effective number density is 16.35 gal/arcmin$^2$, which is nearly double of that of KiDS. The performance of LensFit on deep imaging was calibrated using VOICE-like simulation (Liu et al. 2018). Furthermore, we analyze the reliability of the shear catalogue by calculating the star-galaxy cross-correlations, the tomographic shear correlations of two redshift bins and the contaminations of the blended galaxies. As a further sanity check, we constrain cosmological parameters by exploring the parameter space with Population Monte Carlo sampling. For a flat $\Lambda$CDM model we obtain $\Sigma_8 = \sigma_8(\Omega_{m}/0.3)^{0.5} = 0.68^{+0.11}_{-0.15}$.
  • The VST Optical Imaging of the CDFS and ES1 Fields (VOICE) Survey is proposed to obtain deep optical $ugri$ imaging of the CDFS and ES1 fields using the VLT Survey Telescope (VST). At present, the observations for the CDFS field have been completed, and comprise in total about 4.9 deg$^2$ down to $r_\mathrm{AB}$$\sim$26mag. Weak lensing shear is measured in a companion paper for $r$-band images with seeing $\leq$ 0.9 arcsec. In this work, we perform image simulations to calibrate possible biases of the measured shear signals. Statistically, the properties of the simulated point spread function (PSF) and galaxies show good agreement with those of observations. The multiplicative bias is calibrated to reach an accuracy of 3.0%. We study the bias sensitivities to undetected faint galaxies and to the existence of neighboring galaxies. We find that undetected galaxies contribute to 0.3% multiplicative bias. Further analysis shows that galaxies with lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) suffer from more significant impact due to the skewed background noise caused by undetected galaxies. Meanwhile, we find that although most of the neighbors have been rejected in the shape measurement procedure, about one third of them still remain in the final shear sample. They show larger ellipticity dispersion and contribute to 0.2% multiplicative bias. Simply rejecting these galaxies can reduce the effective number density of galaxies for deep surveys, such as VOICE. Therefore efficient methods should be developed for future weak lensing surveys in order to decompose their overlapped surface brightness distributions.
  • Accurate reconstruction of the spatial distributions of the Point Spread Function (PSF) is crucial for high precision cosmic shear measurements. Nevertheless, current methods are not good at recovering the PSF fluctuations of high spatial frequencies. In general, the residual PSF fluctuations are spatially correlated, therefore can significantly contaminate the correlation functions of the weak lensing signals. We propose a method to correct for this contamination statistically, without any assumptions on the PSF and galaxy morphologies or their spatial distribution. We demonstrate our idea with the data from the W2 field of CFHTLenS.
  • In this work, we present a novel centroiding method based on Fourier space Phase Fitting(FPF) for Point Spread Function(PSF) reconstruction. We generate two sets of simulations to test our method. The first set is generated by GalSim with elliptical Moffat profile and strong anisotropy which shifts the center of the PSF. The second set of simulation is drawn from CFHT i band stellar imaging data. We find non-negligible anisotropy from CFHT stellar images, which leads to $\sim$0.08 scatter in unit of pixels using polynomial fitting method Vakili and Hogg (2016). And we apply FPF method to estimate the centroid in real space, this scatter reduces to $\sim$0.04 in SNR=200 CFHT like sample. In low SNR (50 and 100) CFHT like samples, the background noise dominates the shifting of the centroid, therefore the scatter estimated from different methods are similar. We compare polynomial fitting and FPF using GalSim simulation with optical anisotropy. We find that in all SNR$\sim$50, 100 and 200) samples, FPF performs better than polynomial fitting by a factor of $\sim$3. In general, we suggest that in real observations there are anisotropy which shift the centroid, and FPF method is a better way to accurately locate it.
  • As the second paper of a series on studying galaxy-galaxy lensing signals using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), we present our measurement and modelling of the lensing signals around groups of galaxies. We divide the groups into four halo mass bins, and measure the signals around four different halo-center tracers: brightest central galaxy (BCG), luminosity-weighted center, number-weighted center and X-ray peak position. For X-ray and SDSS DR7 cross identified groups, we further split the groups into low and high X-ray emission subsamples, both of which are assigned with two halo-center tracers, BCGs and X-ray peak positions. The galaxy-galaxy lensing signals show that BCGs, among the four candidates, are the best halo-center tracers. We model the lensing signals using a combination of four contributions: off-centered NFW host halo profile, sub-halo contribution, stellar contribution, and projected 2-halo term. We sample the posterior of 5 parameters i.e., halo mass, concentration, off-centering distance, sub halo mass, and fraction of subhalos via a MCMC package using the galaxy-galaxy lensing signals. After taking into account the sampling effects (e.g. Eddington bias), we found the best fit halo masses obtained from lensing signals are quite consistent with those obtained in the group catalog based on an abundance matching method, except in the lowest mass bin. Subject headings: (cosmology:) gravitational lensing, galaxies: clusters: general
  • This study proposes a Deep Belief Network model to classify traffic flow states. The model is capable of processing massive, high-density, and noise-contaminated data sets generated from smartphone sensors. The statistical features of Vehicle acceleration, angular acceleration, and GPS speed data, recorded by smartphone software, are analyzed, and then used as input for traffic flow state classification. Data from a five-day experiment is used to train and test the proposed model. A total of 747,856 sets of data are generated and used for both traffic flow states classification and sensitivity analysis of input variables. The result shows that the proposed Deep Belief Network model is superior to traditional machine learning methods in both classification performance and computational efficiency.
  • In this Letter, we report the observational constraints on the Hu-Sawicki $f(R)$ theory derived from weak lensing peak abundances, which are closely related to the mass function of massive halos. In comparison with studies using optical or x-ray clusters of galaxies, weak lensing peak analyses have the advantages of not relying on mass-baryonic observable calibrations. With observations from the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope Lensing Survey, our peak analyses give rise to a tight constraint on the model parameter $|f_{R0}|$ for $n=1$. The $95\%$ CL limit is $\log_{10}|f_{R0}| < -4.82$ given WMAP9 priors on $(\Omega_{\rm m}, A_{\rm s})$. With Planck15 priors, the corresponding result is $\log_{10}|f_{R0}| < -5.16$.
  • As the first paper in a series on the study of the galaxy-galaxy lensing from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), we present our image processing pipeline that corrects the systematics primarily introduced by the Point Spread Function (PSF). Using this pipeline, we processed SDSS DR7 imaging data in $r$ band and generated a background galaxy catalog containing the shape information of each galaxy. Based on our own shape measurements of the galaxy images from SDSS DR7, we extract the galaxy-galaxy (GG) lensing signals around foreground spectroscopic galaxies binned in different luminosity and stellar mass. The overall signals are in good agreement with those obtained by \citet{Mandelbaum2005, Mandelbaum2006} from the SDSS DR4. The results in this paper with higher signal to noise ratio is due to the larger survey area than SDSS DR4, confirm that more luminous/massive galaxies bear stronger GG lensing signal. We also divide the foreground galaxies into red/blue and star forming/quenched subsamples and measured their GG lensing signals, respectively. We find that, at a specific stellar mass/luminosity, the red/quenched galaxies have relatively stronger GG lensing signals than their counterparts especially at large radii. These GG lensing signals can be used to probe the galaxy-halo mass relations and their environmental dependences in the halo occupation or conditional luminosity function framework.
  • Based on weak lensing data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), in this paper we study the mass-concentration ($M$-$c$) relation for $\sim 200$ redMaPPer clusters in the fields. We extract the $M$-$c$ relation by measuring the density profiles of individual clusters instead of using stacked weak lensing signals. By performing Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that although the signal-to-noise ratio for each individual cluster is low, the unbiased $M$-$c$ relation can still be reliably derived from a large sample of clusters by carefully taking into account the impacts of shape noise, cluster center offset, dilution effect from member or foreground galaxies, and the projection effect. Our results show that within error bars the derived $M$-$c$ relation for redMaPPer clusters is in agreement with simulation predictions. There is a weak deviation in that the halo concentrations calibrated by Monte Carlo simulations are somewhat higher than that predicted from ${\it Planck}$ cosmology.
  • We present weak lensing constraints on the ellipticity of galaxy-scale matter haloes and the galaxy-halo misalignment. Using data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS), we measure the weighted-average ratio of the aligned projected ellipticity components of galaxy matter haloes and their embedded galaxies, $f_\mathrm{h}$, split by galaxy type. We then compare our observations to measurements taken from the Millennium Simulation, assuming different models of galaxy-halo misalignment. Using the Millennium Simulation we verify that the statistical estimator used removes contamination from cosmic shear. We also detect an additional signal in the simulation, which we interpret as the impact of intrinsic shape-shear alignments between the lenses and their large-scale structure environment. These alignments are likely to have caused some of the previous observational constraints on $f_\mathrm{h}$ to be biased high. From CFHTLenS we find $f_\mathrm{h}=-0.04 \pm 0.25$ for early-type galaxies, which is consistent with current models for the galaxy-halo misalignment predicting $f_\mathrm{h}\simeq 0.20$. For late-type galaxies we measure $f_\mathrm{h}=0.69_{-0.36}^{+0.37}$ from CFHTLenS. This can be compared to the simulated results which yield $f_\mathrm{h}\simeq 0.02$ for misaligned late-type models.
  • Dark energy may be the first sign of new fundamental physics in the Universe, taking either a physical form or revealing a correction to Einsteinian gravity. Weak gravitational lensing and galaxy peculiar velocities provide complementary probes of General Relativity, and in combination allow us to test modified theories of gravity in a unique way. We perform such an analysis by combining measurements of cosmic shear tomography from the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) with the growth of structure from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey and the Six-degree-Field Galaxy Survey (6dFGS), producing the strongest existing joint constraints on the metric potentials that describe general theories of gravity. For scale-independent modifications to the metric potentials which evolve linearly with the effective dark energy density, we find present-day cosmological deviations in the Newtonian potential and curvature potential from the prediction of General Relativity to be (Delta Psi)/Psi = 0.05 \pm 0.25 and (Delta Phi)/Phi = -0.05 \pm 0.3 respectively (68 per cent CL).
  • We derived constraints on cosmological parameters using weak lensing peak statistics measured on the $\sim130~{\rm deg}^2$ of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey (CS82). This analysis demonstrates the feasibility of using peak statistics in cosmological studies. For our measurements, we considered peaks with signal-to-noise ratio in the range of $\nu=[3,6]$. For a flat $\Lambda$CDM model with only $(\Omega_{\rm m}, \sigma_8)$ as free parameters, we constrained the parameters of the following relation $\Sigma_8=\sigma_8(\Omega_{\rm m}/0.27)^{\alpha}$ to be: $\Sigma_8=0.82 \pm 0.03 $ and $\alpha=0.43\pm 0.02$. The $\alpha$ value found is considerably smaller than the one measured in two-point and three-point cosmic shear correlation analyses, showing a significant complement of peak statistics to standard weak lensing cosmological studies. The derived constraints on $(\Omega_{\rm m}, \sigma_8)$ are fully consistent with the ones from either WMAP9 or Planck. From the weak lensing peak abundances alone, we obtained marginalised mean values of $\Omega_{\rm m}=0.38^{+0.27}_{-0.24}$ and $\sigma_8=0.81\pm 0.26$. Finally, we also explored the potential of using weak lensing peak statistics to constrain the mass-concentration relation of dark matter halos simultaneously with cosmological parameters.
  • We present the cluster mass-richness scaling relation calibrated by a weak lensing analysis of >18000 galaxy cluster candidates in the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). Detected using the 3D-Matched-Filter cluster-finder of Milkeraitis et al., these cluster candidates span a wide range of masses, from the small group scale up to $\sim10^{15} M_{\odot}$, and redshifts 0.2 $\lesssim z\lesssim$ 0.9. The total significance of the stacked shear measurement amounts to 54$\sigma$. We compare cluster masses determined using weak lensing shear and magnification, finding the measurements in individual richness bins to yield 1$\sigma$ compatibility, but with magnification estimates biased low. This first direct mass comparison yields important insights for improving the systematics handling of future lensing magnification work. In addition, we confirm analyses that suggest cluster miscentring has an important effect on the observed 3D-MF halo profiles, and we quantify this by fitting for projected cluster centroid offsets, which are typically $\sim$ 0.4 arcmin. We bin the cluster candidates as a function of redshift, finding similar cluster masses and richness across the full range up to $z \sim$ 0.9. We measure the 3D-MF mass-richness scaling relation $M_{200} = M_0 (N_{200} / 20)^\beta$. We find a normalization $M_0 \sim (2.7^{+0.5}_{-0.4}) \times 10^{13} M_{\odot}$, and a logarithmic slope of $\beta \sim 1.4 \pm 0.1$, both of which are in 1$\sigma$ agreement with results from the magnification analysis. We find no evidence for a redshift-dependence of the normalization. The CFHTLenS 3D-MF cluster catalogue is now available at cfhtlens.org.
  • Galaxy-galaxy weak lensing is a direct probe of the mean matter distribution around galaxies. The depth and sky coverage of the CFHT Legacy Survey yield statistically significant galaxy halo mass measurements over a much wider range of stellar masses ($10^{8.75}$ to $10^{11.3} M_{\odot}$) and redshifts ($0.2 < z < 0.8$) than previous weak lensing studies. At redshift $z \sim 0.5$, the stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR) reaches a maximum of $4.0\pm0.2$ percent as a function of halo mass at $\sim 10^{12.25} M_{\odot}$. We find, for the first time from weak lensing alone, evidence for significant evolution in the SHMR: the peak ratio falls as a function of cosmic time from $4.5 \pm 0.3$ percent at $z \sim 0.7$ to $3.4 \pm 0.2$ percent at $z \sim 0.3$, and shifts to lower stellar mass haloes. These evolutionary trends are dominated by red galaxies, and are consistent with a model in which the stellar mass above which star formation is quenched "downsizes" with cosmic time. In contrast, the SHMR of blue, star-forming galaxies is well-fit by a power law that does not evolve with time. This suggests that blue galaxies form stars at a rate that is balanced with their dark matter accretion in such a way that they evolve along the SHMR locus. The redshift dependence of the SHMR can be used to constrain the evolution of the galaxy population over cosmic time.
  • Higher-order, non-Gaussian aspects of the large-scale structure carry valuable information on structure formation and cosmology, which is complementary to second-order statistics. In this work we measure second- and third-order weak-lensing aperture-mass moments from CFHTLenS and combine those with CMB anisotropy probes. The third moment is measured with a significance of $2\sigma$. The combined constraint on $\Sigma_8 = \sigma_8 (\Omega_{\rm m}/0.27)^\alpha$ is improved by 10%, in comparison to the second-order only, and the allowed ranges for $\Omega_{\rm m}$ and $\sigma_8$ are substantially reduced. Including general triangles of the lensing bispectrum yields tighter constraints compared to probing mainly equilateral triangles. Second- and third-order CFHTLenS lensing measurements improve Planck CMB constraints on $\Omega_{\rm m}$ and $\sigma_8$ by 26% for flat $\Lambda$CDM. For a model with free curvature, the joint CFHTLenS-Planck result is $\Omega_{\rm m} = 0.28 \pm 0.02$ (68% confidence), which is an improvement of 43% compared to Planck alone. We test how our results are potentially subject to three astrophysical sources of contamination: source-lens clustering, the intrinsic alignment of galaxy shapes, and baryonic effects. We explore future limitations of the cosmological use of third-order weak lensing, such as the nonlinear model and the Gaussianity of the likelihood function.
  • We present a study of the relation between dark matter halo mass and the baryonic content of host galaxies, quantified via luminosity and stellar mass. Our investigation uses 154 deg2 of Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) lensing and photometric data, obtained from the CFHT Legacy Survey. We employ a galaxy-galaxy lensing halo model which allows us to constrain the halo mass and the satellite fraction. Our analysis is limited to lenses at redshifts between 0.2 and 0.4. We express the relationship between halo mass and baryonic observable as a power law. For the luminosity-halo mass relation we find a slope of 1.32+/-0.06 and a normalisation of 1.19+0.06-0.07x10^13 h70^-1 Msun for red galaxies, while for blue galaxies the best-fit slope is 1.09+0.20-0.13 and the normalisation is 0.18+0.04-0.05x10^13 h70^-1 Msun. Similarly, we find a best-fit slope of 1.36+0.06-0.07 and a normalisation of 1.43+0.11-0.08x10^13 h70^-1 Msun for the stellar mass-halo mass relation of red galaxies, while for blue galaxies the corresponding values are 0.98+0.08-0.07 and 0.84+0.20-0.16x10^13 h70^-1 Msun. For red lenses, the fraction which are satellites tends to decrease with luminosity and stellar mass, with the sample being nearly all satellites for a stellar mass of 2x10^9 h70^-2 Msun. The satellite fractions are generally close to zero for blue lenses, irrespective of luminosity or stellar mass. This, together with the shallower relation between halo mass and baryonic tracer, is a direct confirmation from galaxy-galaxy lensing that blue galaxies reside in less clustered environments than red galaxies. We also find that the halo model, while matching the lensing signal around red lenses well, is prone to over-predicting the large-scale signal for faint and less massive blue lenses. This could be a further indication that these galaxies tend to be more isolated than assumed. [abridged]
  • We present a quantitative analysis of the largest contiguous maps of projected mass density obtained from gravitational lensing shear. We use data from the 154 deg2 covered by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. Our study is the first attempt to quantitatively characterize the scientific value of lensing maps, which could serve in the future as a complementary approach to the study of the dark universe with gravitational lensing. We show that mass maps contain unique cosmological information beyond that of traditional two-points statistical analysis techniques. Using a series of numerical simulations, we first show how, reproducing the CFHTLenS observing conditions, gravitational lensing inversion provides a reliable estimate of the projected matter distribution of large scale structure. We validate our analysis by quantifying the robustness of the maps with various statistical estimators. We then apply the same process to the CFHTLenS data. We find that the 2-points correlation function of the projected mass is consistent with the cosmological analysis performed on the shear correlation function discussed in the CFHTLenS companion papers. The maps also lead to a significant measurement of the third order moment of the projected mass, which is in agreement with analytic predictions, and to a marginal detection of the fourth order moment. Tests for residual systematics are found to be consistent with zero for the statistical estimators we used. A new approach for the comparison of the reconstructed mass map to that predicted from the galaxy distribution reveals the existence of giant voids in the dark matter maps as large as 3 degrees on the sky. Our analysis shows that lensing mass maps can be used for new techniques such as peak statistics and the morphological analysis of the projected dark matter distribution.
  • We present a finely-binned tomographic weak lensing analysis of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey, CFHTLenS, mitigating contamination to the signal from the presence of intrinsic galaxy alignments via the simultaneous fit of a cosmological model and an intrinsic alignment model. CFHTLenS spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands, with accurate shear and photometric redshifts for a galaxy sample with a median redshift of zm =0.70. We estimate the 21 sets of cosmic shear correlation functions associated with six redshift bins, each spanning the angular range of 1.5<theta<35 arcmin. We combine this CFHTLenS data with auxiliary cosmological probes: the cosmic microwave background with data from WMAP7, baryon acoustic oscillations with data from BOSS, and a prior on the Hubble constant from the HST distance ladder. This leads to constraints on the normalisation of the matter power spectrum sigma_8 = 0.799 +/- 0.015 and the matter density parameter Omega_m = 0.271 +/- 0.010 for a flat Lambda CDM cosmology. For a flat wCDM cosmology we constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter w = -1.02 +/- 0.09. We also provide constraints for curved Lambda CDM and wCDM cosmologies. We find the intrinsic alignment contamination to be galaxy-type dependent with a significant intrinsic alignment signal found for early-type galaxies, in contrast to the late-type galaxy sample for which the intrinsic alignment signal is found to be consistent with zero.
  • We use weak gravitational lensing to analyse the dark matter halos around satellite galaxies in galaxy groups in the CFHTLenS dataset. This dataset is derived from the CFHTLS-Wide survey, and encompasses 154 sq. deg of high-quality shape data. Using the photometric redshifts, we divide the sample of lens galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^9 Msun to 10^10.5 Msun into those likely to lie in high-density environments (HDE) and those likely to lie in low-density environments (LDE). Through comparison with galaxy catalogues extracted from the Millennium Simulation, we show that the sample of HDE galaxies should primarily (~61%) consist of satellite galaxies in groups, while the sample of LDE galaxies should consist of mostly (~87%) non-satellite (field and central) galaxies. Comparing the lensing signals around samples of HDE and LDE galaxies matched in stellar mass, the lensing signal around HDE galaxies clearly shows a positive contribution from their host groups on their lensing signals at radii of ~500--1000 kpc, the typical separation between satellites and group centres. More importantly, the subhalos of HDE galaxies are less massive than those around LDE galaxies by a factor 0.65 +/- 0.12, significant at the 2.9 sigma level. A natural explanation is that the halos of satellite galaxies are stripped through tidal effects in the group environment. Our results are consistent with a typical tidal truncation radius of ~40 kpc.
  • We present cosmological constraints from 2D weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) which spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands. Using accurate photometric redshifts and measured shapes for 4.2 million galaxies between redshifts of 0.2 and 1.3, we compute the 2D cosmic shear correlation function over angular scales ranging between 0.8 and 350 arcmin. Using non-linear models of the dark-matter power spectrum, we constrain cosmological parameters by exploring the parameter space with Population Monte Carlo sampling. The best constraints from lensing alone are obtained for the small-scale density-fluctuations amplitude sigma_8 scaled with the total matter density Omega_m. For a flat LambdaCDM model we obtain sigma_8(Omega_m/0.27)^0.6 = 0.79+-0.03. We combine the CFHTLenS data with WMAP7, BOSS and an HST distance-ladder prior on the Hubble constant to get joint constraints. For a flat LambdaCDM model, we find Omega_m = 0.283+-0.010 and sigma_8 = 0.813+-0.014. In the case of a curved wCDM universe, we obtain Omega_m = 0.27+-0.03, sigma_8 = 0.83+-0.04, w_0 = -1.10+-0.15 and Omega_K = 0.006+0.006-0.004. We calculate the Bayesian evidence to compare flat and curved LambdaCDM and dark-energy CDM models. From the combination of all four probes, we find models with curvature to be at moderately disfavoured with respect to the flat case. A simple dark-energy model is indistinguishable from LambdaCDM. Our results therefore do not necessitate any deviations from the standard cosmological model.
  • The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) comprises deep multi-colour (u*g'r'i'z') photometry spanning 154 square degrees, with accurate photometric redshifts and shape measurements. We demonstrate that the redshift probability distribution function summed over galaxies provides an accurate representation of the galaxy redshift distribution accounting for random and catastrophic errors for galaxies with best fitting photometric redshifts z_p < 1.3. We present cosmological constraints using tomographic weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure. We use two broad redshift bins 0.5 < z_p <= 0.85 and 0.85 < z_p <= 1.3 free of intrinsic alignment contamination, and measure the shear correlation function on angular scales in the range ~1-40 arcmin. We show that the problematic redshift scaling of the shear signal, found in previous CFHTLS data analyses, does not afflict the CFHTLenS data. For a flat Lambda-CDM model and a fixed matter density Omega_m=0.27, we find the normalisation of the matter power spectrum sigma_8=0.771 \pm 0.041. When combined with cosmic microwave background data (WMAP7), baryon acoustic oscillation data (BOSS), and a prior on the Hubble constant from the HST distance ladder, we find that CFHTLenS improves the precision of the fully marginalised parameter estimates by an average factor of 1.5-2. Combining our results with the above cosmological probes, we find Omega_m=0.2762 \pm 0.0074 and sigma_8=0.802 \pm 0.013.
  • We present the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) that accurately determines a weak gravitational lensing signal from the full 154 square degrees of deep multi-colour data obtained by the CFHT Legacy Survey. Weak gravitational lensing by large-scale structure is widely recognised as one of the most powerful but technically challenging probes of cosmology. We outline the CFHTLenS analysis pipeline, describing how and why every step of the chain from the raw pixel data to the lensing shear and photometric redshift measurement has been revised and improved compared to previous analyses of a subset of the same data. We present a novel method to identify data which contributes a non-negligible contamination to our sample and quantify the required level of calibration for the survey. Through a series of cosmology-insensitive tests we demonstrate the robustness of the resulting cosmic shear signal, presenting a science-ready shear and photometric redshift catalogue for future exploitation.
  • Granular Solid Hydrodynamics (GSH) is a broad-ranged continual mechanical description of granular media capable of accounting for static stress distributions, yield phenomena, propagation and damping of elastic waves, the critical state, shear band, and fast dense flow. An important input of GSH is an expression for the elastic energy needed to deform the grains. The original expression, though useful and simple, has some draw-backs. Therefore, a slightly more complicated expression is proposed here that eliminates three of them: (1) The maximal angle at which an inclined layer of grains remains stable is increased from $26^\circ$ to the more realistic value of $30^\circ$. (2)Depending on direction and polarization, transverse elastic waves are known to propagate at slightly different velocities. The old expression neglects these differences, the new one successfully reproduces them. (3) Most importantly, the old expression contains only the Drucker-Prager yield surface. The new one contains in addition those named after Coulomb, Lade-Duncan and Matsuoka-Nakai -- realizing each, and interpolating between them, by shifting a single scalar parameter.
  • In this paper we use deep CFHT and SUBARU $uBVRIz$ archival images of the Abell 383 cluster (z=0.187) to estimate its mass by weak lensing. To this end, we first use simulated images to check the accuracy provided by our KSB pipeline. Such simulations include both the STEP 1 and 2 simulations, and more realistic simulations of the distortion of galaxy shapes by a cluster with a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile. From such simulations we estimate the effect of noise on shear measurement and derive the correction terms. The R-band image is used to derive the mass by fitting the observed tangential shear profile with a NFW mass profile. Photometric redshifts are computed from the uBVRIz catalogs. Different methods for the foreground/background galaxy selection are implemented, namely selection by magnitude, color and photometric redshifts, and results are compared. In particular, we developed a semi-automatic algorithm to select the foreground galaxies in the color-color diagram, based on observed colors. Using color selection or photometric redshifts improves the correction of dilution from foreground galaxies: this leads to higher signals in the inner parts of the cluster. We obtain a cluster mass that is ~ 20% higher than previous estimates, and is more consistent the mass expected from X--ray data. The R-band luminosity function of the cluster is finally computed.
  • The decomposition of the cosmic shear field into E- and B-mode is an important diagnostic in weak gravitational lensing. However, commonly used techniques to perform this separation suffer from mode-mixing on very small or very large scales. We introduce a new E-/B-mode decomposition of the cosmic shear two-point correlation on a finite interval. This new statistic is optimised for cosmological applications, by maximising the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and a figure of merit (FoM) based on the Fisher matrix of the cosmological parameters Omega_m and sigma_8. We improve both S/N and FoM results substantially with respect to the recently introduced ring statistic, which also provides E-/B-mode separation on a finite angular range. The S/N (FoM) is larger by a factor of three (two) on angular scales between 1 and 220 arc minutes. In addition, it yields better results than for the aperture-mass dispersion <M_ap>^2, with improvements of 20% (10%) for S/N (FoM). Our results depend on the survey parameters, most importantly on the covariance of the two-point shear correlation function. Although we assume parameters according to the CFHTLS-Wide survey, our method and optimisation scheme can be applied easily to any given survey settings and observing parameters. Arbitrary quantities, with respect to which the E-/B-mode filter is optimised, can be defined, therefore generalising the aim and context of the new shear statistic.