• With better statistics and precision, eccentricity could prove to be a useful tool for understanding the origin and environment of binary black holes. Hierarchical triples in particular, which are abundant in globular clusters and galactic nuclei, could generate observably large eccentricity at LIGO and future gravitational wave detectors. Measuring the eccentricity distribution accurately could help us probe the background and the formation of the mergers. In this paper we continue our previous investigation and improve our semi-analytical description of eccentricity distribution of mergers in galactic nuclei and other hierarchical triple systems. Our result, which further reduces the reliance on numerical simulations, could be useful for statistically distinguishing different formation channels of observed binary mergers.
  • Although gravitational waves tend to erase eccentricity of an inspiraling binary system, ellipticity can be generated in the presence of surrounding matter. We present a semi-analytical method for understanding the eccentricity distribution of binary black holes in the presence of a supermassive black hole in a galactic center. Given a matter distribution, we show how to determine the resultant eccentricity analytically in the presence of both tidal forces and evaporation up to one cutoff and one matter-distribution-independent function, paving the way for understanding the environment of detected inspiraling black holes. We furthermore generalize Kozai-Lidov dynamics to situations where perturbation theory breaks down for short time intervals, allowing more general angular momentum exchange, such that eccentricity is generated even when all bodies orbit in the same plane.
  • Recently it was shown that dark matter with mass of order the weak scale can be charged under a new long-range force, decoupled from the Standard Model, with only weak constraints from early Universe cosmology. Here we consider the implications of an additional charged particle $C$ that is light enough to lead to significant dissipative dynamics on galactic times scales. We highlight several novel features of this model, which can be relevant even when the $C$ particle constitutes only a small fraction of the number density (and energy density). We assume a small asymmetric abundance of the $C$ particle whose charge is compensated by a heavy $X$ particle so that the relic abundance of dark matter consists mostly of symmetric $X$ and $\bar{X}$, with a small asymmetric component made up of $X$ and $C$. As the universe cools, it undergoes asymmetric recombination binding the free $C$s into $(XC)$ dark atoms efficiently. Even with a tiny asymmetric component, the presence of $C$ particles catalyzes tight coupling between the heavy dark matter $X$ and the dark photon plasma that can lead to a significant suppression of the matter power spectrum on small scales and lead to some of the strongest bounds on such dark matter theories. We find a viable parameter space where structure formation constraints are satisfied and significant dissipative dynamics can occur in galactic haloes but show a large region is excluded. Our model shows that subdominant components in the dark sector can dramatically affect structure formation.
  • We revisit constraints on dark matter that is charged under a $U(1)$ gauge group in the dark sector, decoupled from Standard Model forces. We find that the strongest constraints in the literature are subject to a number of mitigating factors. For instance, the naive dark matter thermalization timescale in halos is corrected by saturation effects that slow down isotropization for modest ellipticities. The weakened bounds uncover interesting parameter space, making models with weak-scale charged dark matter viable, even with electromagnetic strength interaction. This also leads to the intriguing possibility that dark matter self-interactions within small dwarf galaxies are extremely large, a relatively unexplored regime in current simulations. Such strong interactions suppress heat transfer over scales larger than the dark matter mean free path, inducing a dynamical cutoff length scale above which the system appears to have only feeble interactions. These effects must be taken into account to assess the viability of darkly-charged dark matter. Future analyses and measurements should probe a promising region of parameter space for this model.
  • The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • While the linear behavior of gravity in braneworld models is well understood, much less is known about full non-linear gravitational effects. Even when they agree at the linear level, these could be expected to distinguish braneworlds from a lower-dimensional theory with no brane. Black holes are a good testing ground for such studies, as they are nonlinear solutions that would be expected to reflect the background geometry. In particular, we assess the role of black hole quasinormal modes in gravitational experiments devised to be sensitive to the existence of the brane, in a lower-dimensional setting where we have analytical control. We compute quasinormal modes of brane-localized black holes and find that they follow the entropy of the corresponding black hole. This observation allows us to conclude that, surprisingly, the scattering problem we consider, at least in some regimes, does not distinguish between non-linear gravitational effects of black holes in AdS space with a brane and black holes in a spacetime of one lower dimension.
  • If a component of dark matter has dissipative interactions, it can cool to form compact astrophysical objects with higher density than that of conventional cold dark matter (sub)haloes. Dark matter annihilations might then appear as point sources, leading to novel morphology for indirect detection. We explore dissipative models where interaction with the Standard Model might provide visible signals, and show how such objects might give rise to the observed excess in gamma rays arising from the galactic center.
  • We show that Fermi repulsion can lead to cored density profiles in dwarf galaxies for sub-keV fermionic dark matter. We treat the dark matter as a quasi-degenerate self-gravitating Fermi gas and calculate its density profile assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. We find that suitable dwarf galaxy cores of larger than 130 pc can be achieved for fermion dark matter with mass in the range 70 eV - 400 eV. While in conventional dark matter scenarios, such sub-keV thermal dark matter would be excluded by free streaming bounds, the constraints are ameliorated in models with dark matter at lower temperature than conventional thermal scenarios, such as the Flooded Dark Matter model that we have previously considered. Modifying the arguments of Tremaine and Gunn we derive a conservative lower bound on the mass of fermionic dark matter of 70 eV and a stronger lower bound from Lyman-$\alpha$ clouds of about 470 eV, leading to slightly smaller cores than have been observed. We comment on this result and how the tension is relaxed in dark matter scenarios with non-thermal momentum distributions.
  • We introduce a potentially powerful method for constraining or discovering a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way. The method relies on the relationship between the midplane densities and scale heights of interstellar gas being determined by the gravitational potential, which is sensitive to the presence of a dark disk. We show how to use the interstellar gas parameters to set a bound on a dark disk and discuss the constraints suggested by the current data. However, current measurements for these parameters are discordant, with the uncertainty in the constraint being dominated by the molecular hydrogen midplane density measurement, as well as by the atomic hydrogen velocity dispersion measurement. Magnetic fields and cosmic ray pressure, which are expected to play a role, are uncertain as well. The current models and data are inadequate to determine the disk's existence, but, taken at face value, may favor its existence depending on the gas parameters used.
  • Recent LHC data hinted at a 750 GeV mass resonance that decays into two photons. A significant feature of this resonance is that its decays to any other Standard Model particles would be too low to be detected so far. Such a state has a compelling explanation in terms of a scalar or a pseudoscalar that is strongly coupled to vector states charged under the Standard Model gauge groups. Such a scenario is readily accommodated in bulk RS with a scalar localized in the bulk away from but close to the Higgs. Turning this around, we argue that a good way to find the elusive bulk RS model might be the search for a resonance with prominent couplings to gauge bosons.
  • We update the method of the Holmberg & Flynn (2000) study, including an updated model of the Milky Way's interstellar gas, radial velocities, an updated reddening map, and a careful statistical analysis, to bound the allowed surface density and scale height of a dark disk. We pay careful attention to the self-consistency of the model, including the gravitational influence of the dark disk on other disk components, and to the net velocity of the tracer stars. We find that the data set exhibits a non-zero bulk velocity in the vertical direction as well as a displacement from the expected location at the Galactic midplane. If not properly accounted for, these features would bias the bound toward low dark disk mass. We therefore perform our analysis two ways. In the first, traditional method, we subtract the mean velocity and displacement from the tracers' phase space distributions. In the second method, we perform a non-equilibrium version of the HF method to derive a bound on the dark disk parameters for an oscillating tracer distribution. Despite updates in the mass model and reddening map, the traditional method results remain consistent with those of HF2000. The second, non-equilibrium technique, however, allows a surface density as large as $14\, M_\odot\,{\rm pc}^{-2}$ (and as small as 0), demonstrating much weaker constraints. For both techniques, the bound on surface density is weaker for larger scale height. In future analyses of Gaia data, it will be important to verify whether the tracer populations are in equilibrium.
  • Most dark matter (DM) models set the DM relic density by some interaction with Standard Model particles. Such models generally assume the existence of Standard Model particles early on, with the DM relic density a later consequence of those interactions. Perhaps a more compelling assumption is that DM is not part of the Standard Model sector and a population of DM too is generated at the end of inflation. This democratic assumption does not necessarily provide a natural value for the DM relic density, and superficially leads to too much entropy in the dark sector. We address the latter issue by the late decay of heavy particles produced at early times, associating the DM relic density with the lifetime of a long-lived state. We ask what it would take for this scenario to be compatible with observations in what we call Flooded Dark Matter (FDM) and discuss several interesting consequences. One is that DM can be very light and furthermore, light DM is in some sense the most natural scenario in FDM as it is compatible with larger couplings of the decaying particle. Moreover, the decay of the field with the smallest coupling and hence the longest lifetime dominates the entropy and possibly the matter content of the Universe, a principle we refer to as 'Maximum Baroqueness'. We also show that the dark sector should be colder than the ordinary sector, relaxing the free-streaming constraints on light DM. We will discuss the implications for the core-cusp problem in a follow-up paper. FDM also has interesting baryogenesis implications. One possibility is that both DM and baryon asymmetries are simultaneously diluted by a late entropy dump. Alternatively, FDM is compatible with an elegant non-thermal leptogenesis implementation in which decays of a heavy RH neutrino lead to late time reheating of the Standard Model and provide suitable conditions for creation of a lepton asymmetry.
  • In the context of warped extra-dimensional models which address both the Planck-weak- and flavor-hierarchies of the Standard Model (SM), it has been argued that certain observables can be calculated within the 5D effective field theory only with the Higgs field propagating in the bulk of the extra dimension, just like other SM fields. The related studies also suggested an interesting form of decoupling of the heavy Kaluza-Klein (KK) fermion states in the warped 5D SM in the limit where the profile of the SM Higgs approaches the IR brane. We demonstrate that a similar phenomenon occurs when we include the mandatory KK excitations of the SM Higgs in loop diagrams giving dipole operators for SM fermions, where the earlier work only considered the SM Higgs (zero mode). In particular, in the limit of a quasi IR-localized SM Higgs, the effect from summing over KK Higgs modes is unsuppressed (yet finite), in contrast to the naive expectation that KK Higgs modes decouple as their masses become large. In this case, a wide range of KK Higgs modes have quasi-degenerate masses and enhanced couplings to fermions relative to those of the SM Higgs, which contribute to the above remarkable result. In addition, we find that the total contribution from KK Higgs modes in general can be comparable to that from the SM Higgs alone. It is also interesting that KK Higgs couplings to KK fermions of the same chirality as the corresponding SM modes have an unsuppressed overall contribution, in contrast to the result from the earlier studies involving the SM Higgs. Our studies suggest that KK Higgs bosons are generally an indispensable part of the warped 5D SM, and their phenomenology such as signals at the LHC are worth further investigation.
  • We show that dissipative dark matter can potentially explain the large observed mass to light ratio of the dwarf satellite galaxies that have been observed in the recently identified planar structure around Andromeda, which are thought to result from tidal forces during a galaxy merger. Whereas dwarf galaxies created from ordinary disks would be dark matter poor, dark matter inside the galactic plane not only provides a source of dark matter, but one that is more readily bound due to the dark matter's lower velocity. This initial N-body study shows that with a thin disk of dark matter inside the baryonic disk, mass-to-light ratios as high as O(30) can be generated when tidal forces pull out patches of sizes similar to the scales of Toomre instabilities of the dark disk. A full simulation will be needed to confirm this result.
  • Although statistical evidence is not overwhelming, possible support for an approximately 35 million year periodicity in the crater record on Earth could indicate a nonrandom underlying enhancement of meteorite impacts at regular intervals. A proposed explanation in terms of tidal effects on Oort cloud comet perturbations as the Solar System passes through the galactic midplane is hampered by lack of an underlying cause for sufficiently enhanced gravitational effects over a sufficiently short time interval and by the time frame between such possible enhancements. We show that a smooth dark disk in the galactic midplane would address both these issues and create a periodic enhancement of the sort that has potentially been observed. Such a disk is motivated by a novel dark matter component with dissipative cooling that we considered in earlier work. We show how to evaluate the statistical evidence for periodicity by input of appropriate measured priors from the galactic model, justifying or ruling out periodic cratering with more confidence than by evaluating the data without an underlying model. We find that, marginalizing over astrophysical uncertainties, the likelihood ratio for such a model relative to one with a constant cratering rate is 3.0, which moderately favors the dark disk model. Our analysis furthermore yields a posterior distribution that, based on current crater data, singles out a dark matter disk surface density of approximately 10 solar masses per square parsec. The geological record thereby motivates a particular model of dark matter that will be probed in the near future.
  • We point out that current constraints on dark matter imply only that the majority of dark matter is cold and collisionless. A subdominant fraction of dark matter could have much stronger interactions. In particular, it could interact in a manner that dissipates energy, thereby cooling into a rotationally-supported disk, much as baryons do. We call this proposed new dark matter component Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM). We argue that DDDM could constitute a fraction of all matter roughly as large as the fraction in baryons, and that it could be detected through its gravitational effects on the motion of stars in galaxies, for example. Furthermore, if DDDM can annihilate to gamma rays, it would give rise to an indirect detection signal distributed across the sky that differs dramatically from that predicted for ordinary dark matter. DDDM and more general partially interacting dark matter scenarios provide a large unexplored space of testable new physics ideas.
  • We consider the prospects for natural SUSY models consistent with current data. Recent constraints make the standard paradigm unnatural so we consider what could be a minimal extension consistent with what we now know. The most promising such scenarios extend the MSSM with new tree-level Higgs interactions that can lift its mass to at least 125 GeV and also allow for flavor-dependent soft terms so that the third generation squarks are lighter than current bounds on the first and second generation squarks. We argue that a common feature of almost all such models is the need for a new scale near 10 TeV, such as a scale of Higgsing or confinement of a new gauge group. We consider the question whether such a model can naturally derive from a single mass scale associated with supersymmetry breaking. Most such models simply postulate new scales, leaving their proximity to the scale of MSSM soft terms a mystery. This coincidence problem may be thought of as a mild tuning, analogous to the usual mu problem. We find that a single mass scale origin is challenging, but suggest that a more natural origin for such a new dynamical scale is the gravitino mass, m_{3/2}, in theories where the MSSM soft terms are a loop factor below m_{3/2}. As an example, we build a variant of the NMSSM where the singlet S is composite, and the strong dynamics leading to compositeness is triggered by masses of order m_{3/2} for some fields. Our focus is the Higgs sector, but our model is compatible with a light stop (with the other generation squarks heavy, or with R-parity violation or another mechanism to hide them from current searches). All the interesting low-energy mass scales, including linear terms for S playing a key role in EWSB, arise dynamically from the single scale m_{3/2}. However, numerical coefficients from RG effects and wavefunction factors in an extra dimension complicate the otherwise simple story.
  • Based on observational constraints on large scale structure and halo structure, dark matter is generally taken to be cold and essentially collisionless. On the other hand, given the large number of particles and forces in the visible world, a more complex dark sector could be a reasonable or even likely possibility. This hypothesis leads to testable consequences, perhaps portending the discovery of a rich hidden world neighboring our own. We consider a scenario that readily satisfies current bounds that we call Partially Interacting Dark Matter (PIDM). This scenario contains self-interacting dark matter, but it is not the dominant component. Even if PIDM contains only a fraction of the net dark matter density, comparable to the baryonic fraction, the subdominant component's interactions can lead to interesting and potentially observable consequences. Our primary focus will be the special case of Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM), in which self-interactions allow the dark matter to lose enough energy to lead to dynamics similar to those in the baryonic sector. We explore a simple model in which DDDM can cool efficiently and form a disk within galaxies, and we evaluate some of the possible observational signatures. The most prominent signal of such a scenario could be an enhanced indirect detection signature with a distinctive spatial distribution. Even though subdominant, the enhanced density at the center of the galaxy and possibly throughout the plane of the galaxy can lead to large boost factors, and could even explain a signature as large as the 130 GeV Fermi line. Such scenarios also predict additional dark radiation degrees of freedom that could soon be detectable and would influence the interpretation of future data, such as that from Planck and from the Gaia satellite. We consider this to be the first step toward exploring a rich array of new possibilities for dark matter dynamics.
  • If a subdominant component of dark matter (DM) interacts via long-range dark force carriers it may cool and collapse to form complex structures within the Milky Way galaxy, such as a rotating dark disk. This scenario was proposed recently and termed "Double-Disk Dark Matter" (DDDM). In this paper we consider the possibility that DDDM remains in a cosmologically long-lived excited state and can scatter exothermically on nuclei (ExoDDDM). We investigate the current status of ExoDDDM direct detection and find that ExoDDDM can readily explain the recently announced ~3 sigma excess observed at CDMS-Si, with almost all of the 90% best-fit parameter space in complete consistency with limits from other experiments, including XENON10 and XENON100. In the absence of isospin-dependent couplings, this consistency requires light DM with mass typically in the 5-15 GeV range. The hypothesis of ExoDDDM can be tested in direct detection experiments through its peaked recoil spectra, reduced annual modulation amplitude, and, in some cases, its novel time-dependence. We also discuss future direct detection prospects and additional indirect constraints from colliders and solar capture of ExoDDDM. As theoretical proof-of-principle, we combine the features of exothermic DM models and DDDM models to construct a complete model of ExoDDDM, exhibiting all the required properties.
  • We study the decoupling of high dimension operators from the the description of the low-energy spectrum in theories where conformal symmetry is broken by a single scale, which we refer to as `broken CFTs'. Holographic duality suggests that this decoupling occurs in generic backgrounds. We show how the decoupling of high mass states in the (d+1)-dimensional bulk relates to the decoupling of high energy states in the d-dimensional broken CFT. In other words, we explain why both high dimension operators and high mass states in the CFT decouple from the low-energy physics of the mesons and glueballs. In many cases, the decoupling can occur exponentially fast in the dimension of the operator. Holography motivates a new kind of form factor proportional to the two point function between broken CFT operators with very different scaling dimensions. This new notion of decoupling can provide a systematic justification for holographic descriptions of QCD and condensed matter systems with only light degrees of freedom in the bulk.
  • Recently the LHCb collaboration reported evidence for direct CP violation in charm decays. The value is sufficiently large that either substantially enhanced Standard Model contributions or non-Standard Model physics is required to explain it. In the latter case only a limited number of possibilities would be consistent with other existing flavor-changing constraints. We show that warped extra dimensional models that explain the quark spectrum through flavor anarchy can naturally give rise to contributions of the size required to explain the the LHCb result. The D meson asymmetry arises through a sizable CP-violating contribution to a chromomagnetic dipole operator. This happens naturally without introducing inconsistencies with existing constraints in the up quark sector. We discuss some subtleties in the loop calculation that are similar to those in Higgs to \gamma\gamma. Loop-induced dipole operators in warped scenarios and their composite analogs exhibit non-trivial dependence on the Higgs profile, with the contributions monotonically decreasing when the Higgs is pushed away from the IR brane. We show that the size of the dipole operator quickly saturates as the Higgs profile approaches the IR brane, implying small dependence on the precise details of the Higgs profile when it is quasi IR localized. We also explain why the calculation of the coefficient of the lowest dimension 5D operator is guaranteed to be finite. This is true not only in the charm sector but also with other radiative processes such as electric dipole moments, b to s\gamma, \epsilon'/\epsilon_K and \mu\ to e\gamma. We furthermore discuss the interpretation of this contribution within the framework of partial compositeness in four dimensions and highlight some qualitative differences between the generic result of composite models and that obtained for dynamics that reproduces the warped scenario.
  • We explore models in which weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter annihilation is directly responsible for baryogenesis, thereby connecting dark matter with baryogenesis. We call this process "WIMPy baryogenesis". The dark matter relic density in these models, as with conventional WIMP models, is obtained with only order one couplings and TeV-scale masses according to the WIMP miracle. Thus, WIMPy baryogenesis models naturally accommodate weak-scale dark matter. Furthermore, an extension of the WIMP miracle simultaneously explains the observed baryon asymmetry and the correct dark matter abundance. The models we present have the further feature that they create the baryon number asymmetry at the weak scale, thereby avoiding the problems in some models of baryogenesis associated with high reheat temperatures in supersymmetric theories. Some of these models yield observable consequences in ongoing and future experiments.
  • If low-energy supersymmetry is realized in nature, a seemingly contrived hierarchy in the squark mass spectrum appears to be required. We show that composite supersymmetric theories at the bottom of the conformal window can automatically yield the spectrum that is suggested by experimental data and naturalness. With a non-tuned choice of parameters, the only superpartners below one TeV will be the partners of the Higgs, the electroweak gauge bosons, the left-handed top and bottom, and the right-handed top, which are precisely the particles needed to make weak scale supersymmetry breaking natural. In the model considered here, these correspond to composite (or partially composite) degrees of freedom via Seiberg duality, while the other MSSM fields, with their heavier superpartners, are elementary. The key observation is that at or near the edge of the conformal window, soft supersymmetry breaking scalar and gaugino masses are transmitted only to fundamental particles at leading order. With the potential that arises from the duality, a Higgs with a 125 GeV mass, with nearly SM production rates, is naturally accommodated without tuning. The lightest ordinary superpartner is either the lightest stop or the lightest neutralino. If it is the stop, it is natural for it to be almost degenerate with the top, in which case it decays to top by emitting a very soft gravitino, making it quite difficult to find this mode at the LHC and more challenging to find SUSY in general, yielding a simple realization of the stealth supersymmetry idea. We analyze four benchmark spectra in detail.
  • We present a new mechanism for transferring a pre-existing lepton or baryon asymmetry to a dark matter asymmetry that relies on mass mixing which is dynamically induced in the early universe. Such mixing can succeed with only generic scales and operators and can give rise to distinctive relationships between the asymmetries in the two sectors. The mixing eliminates the need for the type of additional higher-dimensional operators that are inherent to many current asymmetric dark matter models. We consider several implementations of this idea. In one model, mass mixing is temporarily induced during a two-stage electroweak phase transition in a two Higgs doublet model. In the other class of models, mass mixing is induced by large field vacuum expectation values at high temperatures - either moduli fields or even more generic kinetic terms. Mass mixing models of this type can readily accommodate asymmetric dark matter masses ranging from 1 GeV to 100 TeV and expand the scope of possible relationships between the dark and visible sectors in such models.
  • We present a new paradigm for dark matter in which a dark matter asymmetry is established in the early universe that is then transferred to ordinary matter. We show this scenario can fit naturally into weak scale physics models, with a dark matter candidate mass of this order. We present several natural suppression mechanisms, including bleeding dark matter number density into lepton number, which occurs naturally in models with lepton-violating operators transferring the asymmetry.