• We demonstrate to image asymmetric molecular orbitals via high-order harmonic generation in a one-color inhomogeneous field. Due to the broken inversion symmetry of the inhomogeneous field in space, the returning electrons with energy in a broad range can be forced to recollide from only one direction for all the orientation angles of molecules, which therefore can be used to reconstruct asymmetric molecular orbitals. Following the procedure of molecular orbital tomography, the highest occupied molecular orbital of CO is satisfactorily reconstructed with high-order harmonic spectra driven by the inhomogeneous field. This scheme is helpful to relax the requirement of laser conditions and also applicable to other asymmetric molecules.
  • Photon channel perspective on high harmonic generation (HHG) is proposed by quantizing both the driving laser and high harmonics. It is shown that the HHG yield can be expressed as a sum of the contribution of all the photon channels. From this perspective, the contribution of a specific photon channel follows a simple scaling law and the competition between the channels is well interpreted. Our prediction is shown to be in good agreement with the simulations by solving the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. It also can well explains the experimental results of the HHG in the noncollinear two-color field and bicicular laser field.
  • Recently, the tensor network states (TNS) methods have proven to be very powerful tools to investigate the strongly correlated many-particle physics in one and two dimensions. The implementation of TNS methods depends heavily on the operations of tensors, including contraction, permutation, reshaping tensors, SVD and son on. Unfortunately, the most popular computer languages for scientific computation, such as Fortran and C/C++ do not have a standard library for such operations, and therefore make the coding of TNS very tedious. We develop a Fortran2003 package that includes all kinds of basic tensor operations designed for TNS. It is user-friendly and flexible for different forms of TNS, and therefore greatly simplifies the coding work for the TNS methods.
  • Understanding the retention of hydrogen isotopes in liquid metals, such as lithium and tin, is of great importance in designing a liquid plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. However, experimental diffusivity data of hydrogen isotopes in liquid metals are still limited or controversial. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to predict diffusion coefficients of deuterium in liquid tin at temperatures ranging from 573 to 1673 K. Our simulations indicate faster diffusion of deuterium in liquid tin than the self-diffusivity of tin. In addition, we find that the structural and dynamic properties of tin are insensitive to the inserted deuterium at temperatures and concentrations considered. We also observe that tin and deuterium do not form stable solid compounds. These predicted results from simulations enable us to have a better understanding of the retention of hydrogen isotopes in liquid tin.
  • By using a state of art tensor network state method, we study the ground-state phase diagram of an extended Bose-Hubbard model on the square lattice with frustrated next-nearest neighboring tunneling. In the hardcore limit, tunneling frustration stabilizes a peculiar half supersolid (HSS) phase with one sublattice being superfluid and the other sublattice being Mott Insulator away from half filling. In the softcore case, the model shows very rich phase diagrams above half filling, including three different types of supersolid phases depending on the interaction parameters. The considered model provides a promising route to experimentally search for novel stable supersolid state induced by frustrated tunneling in below half filling region with dipolar atoms or molecules.
  • We report attosecond-scale probing of the laser-induced dynamics in molecules. We apply the method of high-harmonic spectroscopy, where laser-driven recolliding electrons on various trajec- tories record the motion of their parent ion. Based on the transient phase-matching mechanism of high-order harmonic generation, short and long trajectories contributing to the same harmonic order are distinguishable in both the spatial and frequency domains, giving rise to a one-to-one map between time and photon energy for each trajectory. The short and long trajectories in H2 and D2 are used simultaneously to retrieve the nuclear dynamics on the attosecond and angstrom scale. Compared to using only short trajectories, this extends the temporal range of the measurement to one optical cycle. The experiment is also applied to methane and ammonia molecules.
  • Plasmon excitations in free-standing graphene and graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructure are studied using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory within the random phase approximation. Within a single theoretical framework, we examine both the plasmon dispersion behavior and lifetime (line width) of Dirac and $\pi$ plasmons on an equal footing. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the hBN substrate and the anisotropic effect. Furthermore, a model-based analysis indicates that the correct dispersion behavior of $\pi$ plasmons should be $\omega_\pi(q) = \sqrt{E_g^2 + \beta q}$ for small $q$'s, where $E_g$ is the band gap at the $M$ point in the Brillouin zone, and $\beta$ is a fitting parameter. This model is radically different from previous proposals, but in good agreement with our calculated results from first principles.
  • The projected entangled pair states (PEPS) methods have been proved to be powerful tools to solve the strongly correlated quantum many-body problems in two-dimension. However, due to the high computational scaling with the virtual bond dimension $D$, in a practical application PEPS are often limited to rather small bond dimensions, which may not be large enough for some highly entangled systems, for instance, the frustrated systems. The optimization of the ground state using time evolution method with simple update scheme may go to a larger bond dimension. However, the accuracy of the rough approximation to the environment of the local tensors is questionable. Here, we demonstrate that combining the time evolution method with simple update, Monte Carlo sampling techniques and gradient optimization will offer an efficient method to calculate the PEPS ground state. By taking the advantages of massive parallel computing, we can study the quantum systems with larger bond dimensions up to $D$=10 without resorting to any symmetry. Benchmark tests of the method on the $J_1$-$J_2$ model give impressive accuracy compared with exact results.
  • High harmonic generation in the interaction of femtosecond lasers with atoms and molecules opens the path to molecular orbital tomography and to probe the electronic dynamics with attosecond-{\AA}ngstr\"{o}m resolutions. Molecular orbital tomography requires both the amplitude and phase of the high harmonics. Yet the measurement of phases requires sophisticated techniques and represents formidable challenges at present. Here we report a novel scheme, called diffractive molecular orbital tomography, to retrieve the molecular orbital solely from the amplitude of high harmonics without measuring any phase information. We have applied this method to image the molecular orbitals of N$_2$, CO$_2$ and C$_2$H$_2$. The retrieved orbital is further improved by taking account the correction of Coulomb potential. The diffractive molecular orbital tomography scheme, removing the roadblock of phase measurement, significantly simplifies the molecular orbital tomography procedure and paves an efficient and robust way to the imaging of more complex molecules.
  • We investigate the phase diagrams of the effective spin models derived from Fermi-Hubbard and Bose-Hubbard models with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, using string bond states, one of the quantum tensor network states methods. We focus on the role of quantum fluctuation effect in stabilizing the exotic spin phases in these models. For boson systems, and when the ratio between inter-particle and intra-particle interaction $\lambda > 1$, the out-of-plane ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) phases obtained from quantum simulations are the same to those obtained from classic model. However, the quantum order-by-disorder effect reduces the classical in-plane XY-FM and XY-vortex phases to the quantum X/Y-FM and X/Y-stripe phase when $\lambda < 1$. The spiral phase and skyrmion phase can be realized in the presence of quantum fluctuation. For the Fermi-Hubbard model, the quantum fluctuation energies are always important in the whole parameter regime. %, which are much larger than those of the Bose model. A general picture to understand the phase diagrams from symmetry point of view is also presented.
  • Yttrium Iron Garnet is the ubiquitous magnetic insulator used for studying pure spin currents. The exchange constants reported in the literature vary considerably between different experiments and fitting procedures. Here we calculate them from first-principles. The local Coulomb correction (U - J) of density functional theory is chosen such that the parameterized spin model reproduces the experimental Curie temperature and a large electronic band gap, ensuring an insulating phase. The magnon spectrum calculated with our parameters agrees reasonably well with that measured by neutron scattering. A residual disagreement about the frequencies of optical modes indicates the limits of the present methodology.
  • By applying Wannier-based extended Kugel-Khomskii model, we carry out first-principles calculations and electronic structure analysis to understand the spin-phonon coupling effect in transition-metal perovskites. We demonstrate the successful application of our approach to SrMnO$_3$ and BiFeO$_3$. We show that both the electron orbitals under crystal field splitting and the electronic configuration should be taken into account in order to understand the large variances of spin-phonon coupling effects among various phonon modes as well as in different materials.
  • We report the first experimental observation of frequency shift in high order harmonic generation (HHG) from isotopic molecules H2 and D2 . It is found that harmonics generated from the isotopic molecules exhibit obvious spectral red shift with respect to those from Ar atom. The red shift is further demonstrated to arise from the laser-driven nuclear motion in isotopic molecules. By utilizing the red shift observed in experiment, we successfully retrieve the nuclear vibrations in H2 and D2, which agree well with the theoretical calculations from the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE) with Non-Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the frequency shift can be manipulated by changing the laser chirp.
  • The electronic structure and magnetic properties of the strongly correlated material La$_2$O$_3$Fe$_2$Se$_2$ are studied by using both the density function theory plus $U$ (DFT+$U$) method and the DFT plus Gutzwiller (DFT+G) variational method. The ground-state magnetic structure of this material obtained with DFT+$U$ is consistent with recent experiments, but its band gap is significantly overestimated by DFT+$U$, even with a small Hubbard $U$ value. In contrast, the DFT+G method yields a band gap of 0.1 - 0.2 eV, in excellent agreement with experiment. Detailed analysis shows that the electronic and magnetic properties of of La$_2$O$_3$Fe$_2$Se$_2$ are strongly affected by charge and spin fluctuations which are missing in the DFT+$U$ method.
  • The electronic and structural properties of Li$B$O$_3$ ($B$=V, Nb, Ta, Os) are investigated via first-principles methods. We show that Li$B$O$_3$ belong to the recently proposed hyperferroelectrics, i.e., they all have unstable longitudinal optic phonon modes. Especially, the ferroelectric-like instability in the metal LiOsO$_3$, whose optical dielectric constant goes to infinity, is a limiting case of hyperferroelectrics. Via an effective Hamiltonian, we further show that, in contrast to normal proper ferroelectricity, in which the ferroelectric instability usually comes from long-range coulomb interactions, the hyperferroelectric instability is due to the structure instability driven by short-range interactions. This could happen in systems with large ion size mismatches, which therefore provides a useful guidance in searching for novel hyperferroelectrics.
  • We experimentally disentangle the contributions of different quantum paths in high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from the spectrally and spatially resolved harmonic spectra. By adjusting the laser intensity and focusing position, we simultaneously observe the spectrum splitting, frequency shift and intensity-dependent modulation of harmonic yields both for the short and long paths. Based on the simulations, we discriminate the physical mechanisms of the intensity-dependent modulation of HHG due to the quantum path interference and macroscopic interference effects. Moreover, it is shown that the atomic dipole phases of different quantum paths are encoded in the frequency shift. In turn, it enables us to retrieve the atomic dipole phases and the temporal chirps of different quantum paths from the measured harmonic spectra. This result gives an informative mapping of spatiotemporal and spectral features of quantum paths in HHG.
  • We present a first-principles computer code package (ABACUS) that is based on density functional theory and numerical atomic basis sets. Theoretical foundations and numerical techniques used in the code are described, with focus on the accuracy and transferability of the hierarchical atomic basis sets as generated using a scheme proposed by Chen, Guo and He [J. Phys.:Condens. Matter \textbf{22}, 445501 (2010)]. Benchmark results are presented for a variety of systems include molecules, solids, surfaces, and defects. All results show that the ABACUS package with its associated atomic basis sets is an efficient and reliable tool for simulating both small and large-scale materials.
  • The non-Markovianity is a prominent concept of the dynamics of the open quantum systems, which is of fundamental importance in quantum mechanics and quantum information. Despite of lots of efforts, the experimentally measuring of non-Markovianity of an open system is still limited to very small systems. Presently, it is still impossible to experimentally quantify the non-Markovianity of high dimension systems with the widely used Breuer-Laine-Piilo (BLP) trace distance measure. In this paper, we propose a method, combining experimental measurements and numerical calculations, that allow quantifying the non-Markovianity of a $N$ dimension system only scaled as $N^2$, successfully avoid the exponential scaling with the dimension of the open system in the current method. After the benchmark with a two-dimension open system, we demonstrate the method in quantifying the non-Markovanity of a high dimension open quantum random walk system.
  • Biexciton cascade process in self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) provides an ideal system for deterministic entangled photon pair source, which is essential in quantum information science. The entangled photon pairs have recently be realized in experiments after eliminating the FSS of exciton using a number of different methods. However, so far the QDs entangled photon sources are not scalable, because the wavelengths of the QDs are different from dot to dot. Here we propose a wavelength tunable entangled photon emitter on a three dimensional stressor, in which the FSS and exciton energy can be tuned independently, allowing photon entanglement between dissimilar QDs. We confirm these results by using atomistic pseudopotential calculations. This provides a first step towards future realization of scalable entangled photon generators for quantum information applications.
  • Using combined theoretical and experimental approaches, we studied the structural and electronic origin of the magnetic structure in hexagonal LuFeO$_3$. Besides showing the strong exchange coupling that is consistent with the high magnetic ordering temperature, the previously observed spin reorientation transition is explained by the theoretically calculated magnetic phase diagram. The structural origin of this spin reorientation that is responsible for the appearance of spontaneous magnetization, is identified by theory and verified by x-ray diffraction and absorption experiments.
  • We investigate the electric field tuning of the phonon-assisted hole spin relaxation in single self-assembled In$_{1-x}$Ga$_{x}$As/GaAs quantum dots, using an atomistic empirical pseudopotential method. We find that the electric field along the growth direction can tune the hole spin relaxation time for more than one order of magnitude. The electric field can prolong or shorten the hole spin lifetime and the tuning shows an asymmetry in terms of the field direction. The asymmetry is more pronounced for the taller the dot. The results show that the electric field is an effective way to tune the hole spin-relaxation in self-assembled QDs.
  • The tensor network states (TNS) methods combined with Monte Carlo (MC) techniques have been proved a powerful algorithm for simulating quantum many-body systems. However, because the ground state energy is a highly non-linear function of the tensors, it is easy to get stuck in local minima when optimizing the TNS of the simulated physical systems. To overcome this difficulty, we introduce a replica-exchange molecular dynamics optimization algorithm to obtain the TNS ground state, based on the MC sampling techniques, by mapping the energy function of the TNS to that of a classical dynamical system. The method is expected to effectively avoid local minima. We make benchmark tests on a 1D Hubbard model based on matrix product states (MPS) and a Heisenberg $J_1$-$J_2$ model on square lattice based on string bond states (SBS). The results show that the optimization method is robust and efficient compared to the existing results.
  • We have investigated the magnetic structure and ferroelectricity in RbFe(MoO$_4$)$_2$ via first-principles calculations. Phenomenological analyses have shown that ferroelectricity may arise due to both the triangular chirality of the magnetic structure, and through coupling between the magnetic helicity and the ferroaxial structural distortion. Indeed, it was recently proposed that the structural distortion plays a key role in stabilising the chiral magnetic structure itself. We have determined the relative contribution of the two mechanisms via \emph{ab-initio} calculations. Whilst the structural axiality does induce the magnetic helix by modulating the symmetric exchange interactions, the electric polarization is largely due to the in-plane spin triangular chirality, with both electronic and ionic contributions being of relativistic origin. At the microscopic level, we interpret the polarization as a secondary steric consequence of the inverse Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya mechanism and accordingly explain why the ferroaxial component of the electric polarization must be small.
  • We derive analytically the change of exciton fine structure splitting (FSS) under the external stresses in the self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots using the Bir-Pikus model. We find that the FSS change is mainly due to the strain induced valence bands mixing and valence-conduction band coupling. The exciton polarization angle under strain are determined by the argument of the electron-hole off-diagonal exchange integrals. The theory agrees well with the empirical pseudopotential calculations.
  • We calculate the acoustic phonon-assisted exciton spin relaxation in single self-assembled In$_{1-x}$Ga$_x$As/GaAs quantum dots using an atomic empirical pseudopotential method. We show that the transition from bright to dark exciton states is induced by Coulomb correlation effects. The exciton spin relaxation time obtained from sophisticated configuration interaction calculations is approximately 15--55 $\mu$s in pure InAs/GaAs QDs and even longer in alloy dots. These results contradict previous theoretical and experimental results, which suggest very short exciton spin times (a few ns), but agree with more recent experiments that suggest that excitons have long spin relaxation times ($>$ 1 $\mu$s).