• Conical intersections (CIs) have been widely studied using spectroscopic techniques. However, CIs have mainly been identified by rapid internal conversion transitions that take place after the photoexcitation. Such identifications cannot distinguish various types of intersections as well as to separate the actual intersection from an avoided crossing. In this paper, we investigate how ultrafast IR laser pulses can be utilized to stimulate nuclear dynamics revealing geometric phase features associated with CIs. We consider two low-dimensional nonadiabatic models to obtain optimal two- and three-pulse laser sequences for stimulating nuclear dynamics necessary for the CI identification. Our results provide insights on designing non-linear spectroscopic schemes for subsequent probes of the nuclear wavepackets by ultrafast electron diffraction techniques to unambiguously detect CIs in molecules.
  • A new methodology of simulating nonadiabatic dynamics using frozen-width Gaussian wavepackets within the moving crude adiabatic representation with the on-the-fly evaluation of electronic structure is presented. The main feature of the new approach is elimination of any global or local model representation of electronic potential energy surfaces, instead, the electron-nuclear interaction is treated explicitly using the Gaussian integration. As a result, the new scheme does not introduce any uncontrolled approximations. The employed variational principle ensures the energy conservation and leaves the number of electronic and nuclear basis functions as the only parameter determining the accuracy. To assess performance of the approach, a model with two electronic and two nuclear spacial degrees of freedom containing conical intersections between potential energy surfaces has been considered. Dynamical features associated with nonadiabatic transitions and nontrivial geometric (or Berry) phases were successfully reproduced within a limited basis expansion.
  • We investigate geometric phase (GP) effects in nonadiabatic transitions through a conical intersection (CI) in an N-dimensional linear vibronic coupling (ND-LVC) model. This model allows for the coordinate transformation encompassing all nonadiabatic effects within a two-dimensional (2D) subsystem while the other N-2 dimensions form a system of uncoupled harmonic oscillators identical for both electronic states and coupled bi-linearly with the subsystem coordinates. The 2D subsystem governs ultra-fast nonadiabatic dynamics through the CI and provides a convenient model for studying GP effects. Parameters of the original ND-LVC model define the Hamiltonian of the transformed 2D subsystem and thus influence GP effects directly. Our analysis reveals what values of ND-LVC parameters can introduce symmetry breaking in the 2D subsystem that diminishes GP effects.
  • We propose a systematic approach to the basis set extension for nonadiabatic dynamics of entangled combination of nuclear coherent states (CSs) evolving according to the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). TDVP provides a rigorous framework for fully quantum nonadiabatic dynamics of closed systems, however, quality of results strongly depends on available basis functions. Starting with a single nuclear CS replicated vertically on all electronic states, our approach clones this function when replicas of the CS on different electronic states experience increasingly different forces. Created clones move away from each other (decohere) extending the basis set. To determine a moment for cloning we introduce generalized forces based on derivatives that maximally contribute to a variation of the total quantum action and thus account for entanglement of all basis functions.
  • On-the-fly quantum nonadiabatic dynamics for large systems greatly benefits from the adiabatic representation readily available from the electronic structure programs. However, frequently occurring in this representation conical intersections introduce non-trivial geometric or Berry phases which require a special treatment for adequate modelling of the nuclear dynamics. We analyze two approaches for nonadiabatic dynamics using the time-dependent variational principle and the adiabatic representation. The first approach employs adiabatic electronic functions with global parametric dependence on the nuclear coordinates. The second approach uses adiabatic electronic functions obtained only at the centres of moving localized nuclear basis functions (e.g. frozen-width Gaussians). Unless a gauge transformation is used to enforce single-valued boundary conditions, the first approach fails to capture the geometric phase. In contrast, the second approach accounts for the geometric phase naturally because of the absence of the global nuclear coordinate dependence in the electronic functions.
  • Electronic wave-functions in the adiabatic representation acquire nontrivial geometric phases (GPs) when corresponding potential energy surfaces undergo conical intersection (CI). These GPs have profound effects on the nuclear quantum dynamics and cannot be eliminated in the adiabatic representation without changing the physics of the system. To define dynamical effects arising from the GP presence the nuclear quantum dynamics of the CI containing system is compared with that of the system with artificially removed GP. We explore a new construction of the system with removed GP via a modification of the diabatic representation for the original CI containing system. Using an absolute value function of diabatic couplings we remove the GP while preserving adiabatic potential energy surfaces and CI. We assess GP effects in dynamics of a two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling model both for ground and excited state dynamics. Results are compared with those obtained with a conventional removal of the GP by ignoring double-valued boundary conditions of the real electronic wave-functions. Interestingly, GP effects appear similar in two approaches only for the low energy dynamics. In contrast with the conventional approach, a new approach does not have substantial GP effects in the ultra-fast excited state dynamics.
  • Photolyases are proteins capable of harvesting the sunlight to repair DNA damages caused by UV light. In this work we focus on the first step in the repair process of the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photoproduct (CPD) lesion, which is an electron transfer (ET) from a flavine cofactor to CPD, and study the role of various nuclear degrees of freedom (DOF) in this step. The ET step has been experimentally studied using transient spectroscopy and the corresponding data provide excellent basis for testing the quality of quantum dynamical models. Based on previous theoretical studies of electronic structure and conformations of the protein active site, we present a procedure to build a diabatic Hamiltonian for simulating the ET reaction in a molecular complex mimicking the enzyme's active site. We generate a reduced nuclear dimensional model that provides a first non-empirical quantum dynamical description of the structural features influencing the ET rate. By varying the nuclear DOF parametrization in the model to assess the role of different nuclear motions, we demonstrate that the low frequency flavin butterfly bending mode slows ET by reducing Franck-Condon overlaps between donor and acceptor states and also induces decoherence.
  • Methods of quantum nuclear wave-function dynamics have become very efficient in simulating large isolated systems using the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). However, a straightforward extension of the TDVP to the density matrix framework gives rise to methods that do not conserve the energy in the isolated system limit and the total system population for open systems where only energy exchange with the environment is allowed. These problems arise when the system density is in a mixed state and is simulated using an incomplete basis. Thus, the basis set incompleteness, which is inevitable in practical calculations, creates artificial channels for energy and population dissipation. To overcome this unphysical behavior, we have introduced a constrained Lagrangian formulation of TDVP applied to the non-stochastic open system Schrodinger equation (NOSSE) [L. Joubert-Doriol, I. G. Ryabinkin, and A. F. Izmaylov, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 234112 (2014)]. While our formulation can be applied to any variational ansatz for the system density matrix, derivation of working equations and numerical assessment are done within the variational multiconfiguration Gaussian approach for a two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling model system interacting with a harmonic bath.
  • We propose an extension of the Schr\"odinger equation for a quantum system interacting with environment. This equation describes dynamics of auxiliary wave-functions $\mathbf{m}$, from which the system density matrix can be reconstructed as $\hat{\rho} = \mathbf{m} \mathbf{m}^\dagger$. We formulate a compatibility condition, which ensures that the reconstructed density satisfies a given quantum master equation for the system density. The resulting non-stochastic evolution equation preserves positive-definiteness of the system density and is applicable to both Markovian and non-Markovian system-bath treatments. Our formalism also resolves a long-standing problem of energy non-conservation in the time-dependent variational principle applied to mixed states of closed systems.
  • We consider a fully quadratic vibronic model Hamiltonian for studying photoinduced electronic transitions through conical intersections. Using a second order perturbative approximation for diabatic couplings we derive an analytical expression for the time evolution of electronic populations at a given temperature. This formalism extends upon a previously developed perturbative technique for a linear vibronic coupling Hamiltonian. The advantage of the quadratic model Hamiltonian is that it allows one to use separate quadratic representations for potential energy surfaces of different electronic states and a more flexible representation of interstate couplings. We explore features introduced by the quadratic Hamiltonian in a series of 2D models, and then apply our formalism to the 2,6-bis(methylene) adamantyl cation, and its dimethyl derivative. The Hamiltonian parameters for the molecular systems have been obtained from electronic structure calculations followed by a diabatization procedure. The evolution of electronic populations in the molecular systems using the perturbative formalism shows a good agreement with that from variational quantum dynamics.
  • We investigate the role of the geometric phase (GP) in an internal conversion process when the system changes its electronic state by passing through a conical intersection (CI). Local analysis of a two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling (LVC) model Hamiltonian near the CI shows that the role of the GP is twofold. First, it compensates for a repulsion created by the so-called diagonal Born-Oppenheimer correction (DBOC). Second, the GP enhances the non-adiabatic transition probability for a wave-packet part that experiences a central collision with the CI. To assess the significance of both GP contributions we propose two indicators that can be computed from parameters of electronic surfaces and initial conditions. To generalize our analysis to N-dimensional systems we introduce a reduction of a general N-dimensional LVC model to an effective 2D LVC model using a mode transformation that preserves short-time dynamics of the original N-dimensional model. Using examples of the bis(methylene) adamantyl and butatriene cations, and the pyrazine molecule we have demonstrated that their effective 2D models reproduce the short-time dynamics of the corresponding full dimensional models, and the introduced indicators are very reliable in assessing GP effects.
  • In molecular systems containing conical intersections (CIs), a nontrivial geometric phase (GP) appears in the nuclear and electronic wave-functions in the adiabatic representation. We study GP effects in nuclear dynamics of an N-dimensional linear vibronic coupling (LVC) model. The main impact of GP on low-energy nuclear dynamics is reduction of population transfer between the local minima of the LVC lower energy surface. For the LVC model, we proposed an isometric coordinate transformation that confines non-adiabatic effects within a two-dimensional subsystem interacting with an N-2 dimensional environment. Since environmental modes do not couple electronic states, all GP effects originate from nuclear dynamics within the subsystem. We explored when the GP affects nuclear dynamics of the isolated subsystem, and how the subsystem-environment interaction can interfere with GP effects. Comparing quantum dynamics with and without GP allowed us to devise simple rules to determine significance of the GP for nuclear dynamics in this model.