• We present results of our large scale, optical, multi-epoch photometric survey of ~180 square degrees across the Orion OB1 association, complemented with extensive follow up spectroscopy. We map and characterize in an uniform way the off-cloud, low-mass, pre-main sequence populations. We report 2064, mostly K and M-type, confirmed T Tauri members. Most (59%) are located in the OB1a subassociation, 27% in OB1b, and 14% within the confines of the A and B molecular clouds. There is significant structure in the spatial distribution of the young stars. We characterize two new clusterings of T Tauri stars, HD 35762 and HR 1833 in the OB1a subassociation, and two stellar overdensities in OB1b. There is indication of two populations of young stars in the OB1b region, located at two different distances, which may be due to the OB1a subassociation overlapping on front of OB1b. The various groups and regions can be ordered in an age sequence that agrees with the long standing picture of star formation starting in Orion OB1a some 10-15 Myr ago. We define a new type of T Tauri star, the C/W class, objects we propose may be nearing the end of their accretion phase. We detect the observational signature of Li depletion in young K and M stars with a timescale of 8.5 Myr. The decline of the accretion fraction from ~2 - 10 Myr, implies an accretion e-folding timescale of 2.1 Myr. Finally, the median amplitude of the V-band variability shows the decline of stellar activity, from accreting Classical T Tauri stars to the least active field dwarfs.
  • The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the universe using the baryon acoustic oscillations technique. The spectra of 35 million galaxies and quasars over 14,000 square degrees will be measured during a 5-year survey. A new prime focus corrector for the Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory will deliver light to 5,000 individually targeted fiber-fed robotic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broadband multi-object spectrographs. We describe the ProtoDESI experiment, that was installed and commissioned on the 4-m Mayall telescope from August 14 to September 30, 2016. ProtoDESI was an on-sky technology demonstration with the goal to reduce technical risks associated with aligning optical fibers with targets using robotic fiber positioners and maintaining the stability required to operate DESI. The ProtoDESI prime focus instrument, consisting of three fiber positioners, illuminated fiducials, and a guide camera, was installed behind the existing Mosaic corrector on the Mayall telescope. A Fiber View Camera was mounted in the Cassegrain cage of the telescope and provided feedback metrology for positioning the fibers. ProtoDESI also provided a platform for early integration of hardware with the DESI Instrument Control System that controls the subsystems, provides communication with the Telescope Control System, and collects instrument telemetry data. Lacking a spectrograph, ProtoDESI monitored the output of the fibers using a Fiber Photometry Camera mounted on the prime focus instrument. ProtoDESI was successful in acquiring targets with the robotically positioned fibers and demonstrated that the DESI guiding requirements can be met.
  • SweetSpot is a three-year National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Survey program to observe Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the smooth Hubble flow with the WIYN High-resolution Infrared Camera (WHIRC) on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope. We here present data from the first half of this survey, covering the 2011B-2013B NOAO semesters, and consisting of 493 calibrated images of 74 SNe Ia observed in the rest-frame near-infrared (NIR) from $0.02 < z < 0.09$. Because many observed supernovae require host galaxy subtraction from templates taken in later semesters, this release contains only the 186 NIR ($JHK_s$) data points for the 33 SNe Ia that do not require host-galaxy subtraction. The sample includes 4 objects with coverage beginning before the epoch of B-band maximum and 27 beginning within 20 days of B-band maximum. We also provide photometric calibration between the WIYN+WHIRC and Two-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) systems along with light curves for 786 2MASS stars observed alongside the SNe Ia. This work is the first in a planned series of three SweetSpot Data Releases. Future releases will include the full set of images from all 3 years of the survey, including host-galaxy reference images and updated data processing and host-galaxy reference subtraction. SweetSpot will provide a well-calibrated sample that will help improve our ability to standardize distance measurements to SNe Ia, examine the intrinsic optical-NIR colors of SNe Ia at different epochs, explore nature of dust in other galaxies, and act as a stepping stone for more distant, potentially space-based surveys.
  • Arjun Dey, David J. Schlegel, Dustin Lang, Robert Blum, Kaylan Burleigh, Xiaohui Fan, Joseph R. Findlay, Doug Finkbeiner, David Herrera, Stephanie Juneau, Martin Landriau, Michael Levi, Ian McGreer, Aaron Meisner, Adam D. Myers, John Moustakas, Peter Nugent, Anna Patej, Edward F. Schlafly, Alistair R. Walker, Francisco Valdes, Benjamin A. Weaver, Christophe Yeche, Hu Zou, Xu Zhou, Behzad Abareshi, T. M. C. Abbott, Bela Abolfathi, C. Aguilera, Lori Allen, A. Alvarez, James Annis, Marie Aubert, Eric F. Bell, Segev Y. BenZvi, Richard M. Bielby, Adam S. Bolton, Cesar Briceno, Elizabeth J. Buckley-Geer, Karen Butler, Annalisa Calamida, Raymond G. Carlberg, Paul Carter, Ricard Casas, Francisco J. Castander, Yumi Choi, Johan Comparat, Elena Cukanovaite, Timothee Delubac, Kaitlin DeVries, Sharmila Dey, Govinda Dhungana, Mark Dickinson, Zhejie Ding, John B. Donaldson, Yutong Duan, Christopher J. Duckworth, Sarah Eftekharzadeh, Daniel J. Eisenstein, Thomas Etourneau, Parker A. Fagrelius, Jay Farihi, Mike Fitzpatrick, Andreu Font-Ribera, Leah Fulmer, Boris T. Gansicke, Enrique Gaztanaga, Koshy George, David W. Gerdes, Satya Gontcho A Gontcho, Gregory Green, Julien Guy, Diane Harmer, M. Hernandez, Klaus Honscheid, Lijuan Huang, David James, Buell T. Jannuzi, Linhua Jiang, Richard Joyce, Armin Karcher, Sonia Karkar, Robert Kehoe, Jean-Paul Kneib, Andrea Kueter-Young, Ting-Wen Lan, Tod Lauer, Laurent Le Guillou, Auguste Le Van Suu, Jae Hyeon Lee, Michael Lesser, Ting S. Li, Justin L. Mann, Bob Marshall, C. E. Martínez-Vázquez, Paul Martini, Helion du Mas des Bourboux, Sean McManus, Brice Menard, Nigel Metcalfe, Andrea Muñoz-Gutiérrez, Joan Najita, Kevin Napier, Gautham Narayan, Jeffrey A. Newman, Jundan Nie, Brian Nord, Dara J. Norman, Knut A.G. Olsen, Anthony Paat, Nathalie Palanque-Delabrouille, Xiyan Peng, Claire L. Poppett, Megan R. Poremba, Abhishek Prakash, David Rabinowitz, Anand Raichoor, Mehdi Rezaie, A. N. Robertson, Natalie A. Roe, Ashley J. Ross, Nicholas P. Ross, Gregory Rudnick, Sasha Safonova, Abhijit Saha, F. Javier Sanchez, Heidi Schweiker, Adam Scott, Hee-Jong Seo, Huanyuan Shan, David R. Silva, Christian Soto, David Sprayberry, Ryan Staten, Coley M. Stillman, Robert J. Stupak, David L. Summers, Suk Sien Tie, H. Tirado, Mariana Vargas-Magana, A. Katherina Vivas, Risa H. Wechsler, Doug Williams, Jinyi Yang, Qian Yang, Tolga Yapici, Dennis Zaritsky, A. Zenteno, Kai Zhang, Tianmeng Zhang, Rongpu Zhou, Zhimin Zhou
    April 23, 2018 astro-ph.IM
    The DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys are a combination of three public projects (the Dark Energy Camera Legacy Survey, the Beijing-Arizona Sky Survey, and the Mayall z-band Legacy Survey) that will jointly image ~14,000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky visible from the northern hemisphere in three optical bands (g, r, and z) using telescopes at the Kitt Peak National Observatory and the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. The combined survey footprint is split into two contiguous areas by the Galactic plane. The optical imaging is conducted using a unique strategy of dynamic observing that results in a survey of nearly uniform depth. In addition to calibrated images, the project is delivering an inference-based catalog which includes photometry from the grz optical bands and from four mid-infrared bands (at 3.4um, 4.6um, 12um and 22um) observed by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite during its full operational lifetime. The project plans two public data releases each year. All the software used to generate the catalogs is also released with the data. This paper provides an overview of the Legacy Surveys project.
  • Using the most recent prototypes, design, and as-built system information, we test and quantify the capability of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) to discover Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) and Near-Earth Objects (NEOs). We empirically estimate an expected upper limit to the false detection rate in LSST image differencing, using measurements on DECam data and prototype LSST software and find it to be about $450$~deg$^{-2}$. We show that this rate is already tractable with current prototype of the LSST Moving Object Processing System (MOPS) by processing a 30-day simulation consistent with measured false detection rates. We proceed to evaluate the performance of the LSST baseline survey strategy for PHAs and NEOs using a high-fidelity simulated survey pointing history. We find that LSST alone, using its baseline survey strategy, will detect $66\%$ of the PHA and $61\%$ of the NEO population objects brighter than $H=22$, with the uncertainty in the estimate of $\pm5$ percentage points. By generating and examining variations on the baseline survey strategy, we show it is possible to further improve the discovery yields. In particular, we find that extending the LSST survey by two additional years and doubling the MOPS search window increases the completeness for PHAs to $86\%$ (including those discovered by contemporaneous surveys) without jeopardizing other LSST science goals ($77\%$ for NEOs). This equates to reducing the undiscovered population of PHAs by additional $26\%$ ($15\%$ for NEOs), relative to the baseline survey.
  • We present a spectroscopic survey of the stellar population of the Sigma Orionis cluster. We have obtained spectral types for 340 stars. Spectroscopic data for spectral typing come from several spectrographs with similar spectroscopic coverage and resolution. More than a half of stars of our sample are members confirmed by the presence of lithium in absorption, strong H$\alpha$ in emission or weak gravity-sensitive features. In addition, we have obtained high resolution (R~34000) spectra in the H$\alpha$ region for 169 stars in the region. Radial velocities were calculated from this data set. The radial velocity distribution for members of the cluster is in agreement with previous work. Analysis of the profile of the H$\alpha$ line and infrared observations reveals two binary systems or fast rotators that mimic the H$\alpha$ width expected in stars with accretion disks. On the other hand there are stars with optically thick disks and narrow H$\alpha$ profile not expected in stars with accretion disks. This contribution constitutes the largest homogeneous spectroscopic data set of the Sigma Orionis cluster to date.
  • We present the results of a survey of the low mass star and brown dwarf population of the 25 Orionis group. Using optical photometry from the CIDA Deep Survey of Orion, near IR photometry from the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy and low resolution spectroscopy obtained with Hectospec at the MMT, we selected 1246 photometric candidates to low mass stars and brown dwarfs with estimated masses within $0.02 \lesssim M/M_\odot \lesssim 0.8$ and spectroscopically confirmed a sample of 77 low mass stars as new members of the cluster with a mean age of $\sim$7 Myr. We have obtained a system initial mass function of the group that can be well described by either a Kroupa power-law function with indices $\alpha_3=-1.73\pm0.31$ and $\alpha_2=0.68\pm0.41$ in the mass ranges $0.03\leq M/M_\odot\leq 0.08$ and $0.08\leq M/M_\odot\leq0.5$ respectively, or a Scalo log-normal function with coefficients $m_c=0.21^{+0.02}_{-0.02}$ and $\sigma=0.36\pm0.03$ in the mass range $0.03\leq M/M_\odot\leq0.8$. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of this numerous candidate sample, we have confirmed the East-West elongation of the 25 Orionis group observed in previous works, and rule out a possible southern extension of the group. We find that the spatial distributions of low mass stars and brown dwarfs in 25 Orionis are statistically indistinguishable. Finally, we found that the fraction of brown dwarfs showing IR excesses is higher than for low mass stars, supporting the scenario in which the evolution of circumstellar discs around the least massive objects could be more prolonged.
  • We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30-day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes, and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical "dippers" having discrete fading events lasting ~1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H$\alpha$ emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.
  • We present 13 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the restframe near-infrared (NIR) from 0.02 < z < 0.09 with the WIYN High-resolution Infrared Camera (WHIRC) on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope. With only 1-3 points per light curve and a prior on the time of maximum from the spectrum used to type the object we measure an H-band dispersion of spectroscopically normal SNe Ia of 0.164 mag. These observations continue to demonstrate the improved standard brightness of SNe Ia in H-band even with limited data. Our sample includes two SNe Ia at z ~ 0.09, which represent the most distant restframe NIR H-band observations published to date. This modest sample of 13 NIR SNe Ia represent the pilot sample for "SweetSpot" - a three-year NOAO Survey program that will observe 144 SNe Ia in the smooth Hubble flow. By the end of the survey we will have measured the relative distance to a redshift of z ~ 0.05 to 1%. Nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations such as these will test the standard nature of SNe Ia in the restframe NIR, allow insight into the nature of dust, and provide a critical anchor for future cosmological SN Ia surveys at higher redshift.
  • This paper presents a study of the rate and efficiency of star formation in the NGC 6334 star forming region. We obtained observations at J, H, and Ks taken with the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Imager (NEWFIRM) and combined them with observations taken with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope at wavelengths {\lambda} = 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {\mu}m. We also analyzed previous observations taken at 24 {\mu}m using the Spitzer MIPS camera as part of the MIPSGAL survey. We have produced a point source catalog with >700,000 entries. We have identified 2283 YSO candidates, 375 Class I YSOs and 1908 Class II YSOs using a combination of existing IRAC-based color classification schemes that we have extended and validated to the near-IR for use with warm Spitzer data. We have identified multiple new sites of ongoing star formation activity along filamentary structures extending tens of parsecs beyond the central molecular ridge of NGC 6334. By mapping the extinction we derived an estimate for the gas mass, 2.2 x 10^5 M_sun. The heavy concentration of protostars along the dense filamentary structures indicates that NGC 6334 may be undergoing a "mini-starburst" event with {\Sigma}{SFR}>8.2 M_sun Myr^-1 pc^-2 and SFE>0.10. We have used these estimates to place NGC 6334 in the Kennicutt-Schmidt diagram to help bridge the gap between observations of local low-mass star forming regions and star formation in other galaxies.
  • We perform a census of the reddest, and potentially youngest, protostars in the Orion molecular clouds using data obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory and the LABOCA and SABOCA instruments on APEX as part of the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey (HOPS). A total of 55 new protostar candidates are detected at 70 um and 160 um that are either too faint (m24 > 7 mag) to be reliably classified as protostars or undetected in the Spitzer/MIPS 24 um band. We find that the 11 reddest protostar candidates with log (lambda F_lambda 70) / (lambda F_lambda 24) > 1.65 are free of contamination and can thus be reliably explained as protostars. The remaining 44 sources have less extreme 70/24 colors, fainter 70 um fluxes, and higher levels of contamination. Taking the previously known sample of Spitzer protostars and the new sample together, we find 18 sources that have log (lambda F_lambda 70) / (lambda F_lambda 24) > 1.65; we name these sources "PACS Bright Red sources", or PBRs. Our analysis reveals that the PBRs sample is composed of Class 0 like sources characterized by very red SEDs (T_bol < 45 K) and large values of sub-millimeter fluxes (L_smm/L_bol > 0.6%). Modified black-body fits to the SEDs provide lower limits to the envelope masses of 0.2 M_sun to 2 M_sun and luminosities of 0.7 L_sun to 10 L_sun. Based on these properties, and a comparison of the SEDs with radiative transfer models of protostars, we conclude that the PBRs are most likely extreme Class 0 objects distinguished by higher than typical envelope densities and hence, high mass infall rates.
  • We extend our previous study of the stellar population of L1641, the lower-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the dense Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC), with the goal of testing whether there is a statistically significant deficiency of high-mass stars in low-density regions. Previously, we compared the observed ratio of low-mass stars to high-mass stars with theoretical models of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) to infer a deficiency of the highest-mass stars in L1641. We expand our population study to identify the intermediate mass (late B to G) L1641 members in an attempt to make a more direct comparison with the mass function of the nearby ONC. The spectral type distribution and the K-band luminosity function of L1641 are similar to those of the ONC (Hillenbrand 1997; Muench et al. 2002), but problems of incompleteness and contamination prevent us from making a detailed test for differences. We limit our analysis to statistical tests of the ratio of high-mass to low-mass stars, which indicate a probability of only 3% that the ONC and the southern region of L1641 were drawn from the same population, supporting the hypothesis that the upper mass end of the IMF is dependent on environmental density.
  • We present Spitzer IRAC (2.1 sq. deg.) and MIPS (6.5 sq. deg.) observations of star formation in the Ophiuchus North molecular clouds. This fragmentary cloud complex lies on the edge of the Sco-Cen OB association, several degrees to the north of the well-known rho Oph star-forming region, at an approximate distance of 130 pc. The Ophiuchus North clouds were mapped as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt project under the working name `Scorpius'. In the regions mapped, selected to encompass all the cloud with visual extinction AV>3, eleven Young Stellar Object (YSO) candidates are identified, eight from IRAC/MIPS colour-based selection and three from 2MASS K/MIPS colours. Adding to one source previously identified in L43 (Chen et al. 2009), this increases the number of YSOcs identified in Oph N to twelve. During the selection process, four colour-based YSO candidates were rejected as probable AGB stars and one as a known galaxy. The sources span the full range of YSOc classifications from Class 0/1 to Class III, and starless cores are also present. Twelve high-extinction (AV>10) cores are identified with a total mass of approx. 100 solar masses. These results confirm that there is little ongoing star formation in this region (instantaneous star formation efficiency <0.34%) and that the bottleneck lies in the formation of dense cores. The influence of the nearby Upper Sco OB association, including the 09V star zeta Oph, is seen in dynamical interactions and raised dust temperatures but has not enhanced levels of star formation in Ophiuchus North.
  • We present results from an optical photometric and spectroscopic survey of the young stellar population in L1641, the low-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Our goal is to determine whether L1641 has a large enough low-mass population to make the known lack of high-mass stars a statistically-significant demonstration of environmental dependence of the upper mass stellar initial mass function (IMF). Our spectroscopic sample consists of IR-excess objects selected from the Spitzer/IRAC survey and non-excess objects selected from optical photometry. We have spectral confirmation of 864 members, with another 98 probable members; of the confirmed members, 406 have infrared excesses and 458 do not. Assuming the same ratio of stars with and without IR excesses in the highly-extincted regions, L1641 may contain as many as ~1600 stars down to ~0.1 solar mass, comparable within a factor of two to the the ONC. Compared to the standard models of the IMF, L1641 is deficient in O and early B stars to a 3-4 sigma significance level, assuming that we know of all the massive stars in L1641. With a forthcoming survey of the intermediate-mass stars, we will be in a better position to make a direct comparison with the neighboring, dense ONC, which should yield a stronger test of the dependence of the high-mass end of the stellar initial mass function upon environment.
  • We present 3.6 to 70 {\mu}m Spitzer photometry of 154 weak-line T Tauri stars (WTTS) in the Chamaeleon, Lupus, Ophiuchus and Taurus star formation regions, all of which are within 200 pc of the Sun. For a comparative study, we also include 33 classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) which are located in the same star forming regions. Spitzer sensitivities allow us to robustly detect the photosphere in the IRAC bands (3.6 to 8 {\mu}m) and the 24 {\mu}m MIPS band. In the 70 {\mu}m MIPS band, we are able to detect dust emission brighter than roughly 40 times the photosphere. These observations represent the most sensitive WTTS survey in the mid to far infrared to date, and reveal the frequency of outer disks (r = 3-50 AU) around WTTS. The 70 {\mu}m photometry for half the c2d WTTS sample (the on-cloud objects), which were not included in the earlier papers in this series, Padgett et al. (2006) and Cieza et al. (2007), are presented here for the first time. We find a disk frequency of 19% for on-cloud WTTS, but just 5% for off- cloud WTTS, similar to the value reported in the earlier works. WTTS exhibit spectral energy distributions (SEDs) that are quite diverse, spanning the range from optically thick to optically thin disks. Most disks become more tenuous than Ldisk/L* = 2 x 10^-3 in 2 Myr, and more tenuous than Ldisk/L* = 5 x 10^-4 in 4 Myr.
  • We present multi-epoch Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the transitional disk LRLL 31 in the 2-3 Myr-old star forming region IC 348. Our measurements show remarkable mid-infrared variability on timescales as short as one week. The infrared continuum emission exhibits systematic wavelength-dependent changes that suggest corresponding dynamical changes in the inner disk structure and variable shadowing of outer disk material. We propose several possible sources for the structural changes, including a variable accretion rate or a stellar or planetary companion embedded in the disk. Our results indicate that variability studies in the infrared can provide important new constraints on protoplanetary disk behavior.
  • A review of star formation in the Rho Ophiuchi molecular complex is presented, with particular emphasis on studies of the main cloud, L1688, since 1991. Recent photometric and parallax measurements of stars in the Upper Scorpius subgroup of the Sco-Cen OB association suggest a distance for the cloud between 120 and 140 parsecs. Star formation is ongoing in the dense cores of L1688 with a median age for young stellar objects of 0.3 Myr. The surface population appears to have a median age of 2-5 Myr and merges with low mass stars in the Upper Scorpius subgroup. Making use of the most recent X-ray and infrared photometric surveys and spectroscopic surveys of L1688, we compile a list of over 300 association members with counterparts in the 2MASS catalog. Membership criteria, such as lithium absorption, X-ray emission, and infrared excess, cover the full range of evolutionary states for young stellar objects. Spectral energy distributions are classified for many association members using infrared photometry obtained from the Spitzer Space Telescope.
  • We present a census of the population of deeply embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Ophiuchus molecular cloud complex based on a combination of Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared data from the "Cores to Disks" (c2d) legacy team and JCMT/SCUBA submillimeter maps from the COMPLETE team. We have applied a method developed for identifying embedded protostars in Perseus to these datasets and in this way construct a relatively unbiased sample of 27 candidate embedded protostars with envelopes more massive than our sensitivity limit (about 0.1 M_sun). Embedded YSOs are found in 35% of the SCUBA cores - less than in Perseus (58%). On the other hand the mid-infrared sources in Ophiuchus have less red mid-infrared colors, possibly indicating that they are less embedded. We apply a nearest neighbor surface density algorithm to define the substructure in each of the clouds and calculate characteristic numbers for each subregion - including masses, star formation efficiencies, fraction of embedded sources etc. Generally the main clusters in Ophiuchus and Perseus (L1688, NGC1333 and IC348) are found to have higher star formation efficiencies than small groups such as B1, L1455 and L1448, which on the other hand are completely dominated by deeply embedded protostars. We discuss possible explanations for the differences between the regions in Perseus and Ophiuchus, such as different evolutionary timescales for the YSOs or differences, e.g., in the accretion in the two clouds.
  • One of the central goals of the Spitzer Legacy Project ``From Molecular Cores to Planet-forming Disks'' (c2d) is to determine the frequency of remnant circumstellar disks around weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTs) and to study the properties and evolutionary status of these disks. Here we present a census of disks for a sample of over 230 spectroscopically identified wTTs located in the c2d IRAC (3.6, 4.5, 4.8, and 8.0 um) and MIPS (24 um) maps of the Ophiuchus, Lupus, and Perseus Molecular Clouds. We find that ~20% of the wTTs in a magnitude limited subsample have noticeable IR-excesses at IRAC wavelengths indicating the presence of a circumstellar disk. The disk frequencies we find in these 3 regions are ~3-6 times larger than that recently found for a sample of 83 relatively isolated wTTs located, for the most part, outside the highest extinction regions covered by the c2d IRAC and MIPS maps. The disk fractions we find are more consistent with those obtained in recent Spitzer studies of wTTs in young clusters such as IC 348 and Tr 37. From their location in the H-R diagram, we find that, in our sample, the wTTs with excesses are among the younger part of the age distribution. Still, up to ~50% of the apparently youngest stars in the sample show no evidence of IR excess, suggesting that the circumstellar disks of a sizable fraction of pre-main-sequence stars dissipate in a timescale of ~1 Myr. We also find that none of the stars in our sample apparently older than ~10 Myrs have detectable circumstellar disks at wavelengths < 24 um. Also, we find that the wTTs disks in our sample exhibit a wide range of properties (SED morphology, inner radius, L_DISK/L*, etc) which bridge the gaps observed between the cTTs and the debris disk regimes.
  • We present observations of six late-type members of the young cluster IC 348 detected at 24 microns with the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer(MIPS). At least four of the objects are probably substellar. Combining these data with ground-based optical and near-infrared photometry and complementary observations with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC), we have modeled the spectral energy distributions using detailed models of irradiated accretion disks. We are able to fit the observations with models using a range of maximum grain sizes from ISM-type dust to grains as large as 1 millimeter. Two objects show a lack of excess emission at wavelengths shortward of 5.8-8 microns but significant excess at longer wavelengths, indicative of large optically thin or evacuated inner holes. Our models indicate a inner hole of radius ~ 0.5-0.9 AU for the brown dwarf L316; this is the first brown dwarf with evidence for an AU-scale inner disk hole. We examine several possible mechanisms for the inner disk clearing in this case, including photoevaporation and planet formation.
  • We present infrared photometry obtained with the IRAC camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope of a sample of 82 pre-main sequence stars and brown dwarfs in the Taurus star-forming region. We find a clear separation in some IRAC color-color diagrams between objects with and without disks. A few ``transition'' objects are noted, which correspond to systems in which the inner disk has been evacuated of small dust. Separating pure disk systems from objects with remnant protostellar envelopes is more difficult at IRAC wavelengths, especially for objects with infall at low rates and large angular momenta. Our results generally confirm the IRAC color classification scheme used in previous papers by Allen et al. and Megeath et al. to distinguish between protostars, T Tauri stars with disks, and young stars without (inner) disks. The observed IRAC colors are in good agreement with recent improved disk models, and in general accord with models for protostellar envelopes derived from analyzing a larger wavelength region. We also comment on a few Taurus objects of special interest. Our results should be useful for interpreting IRAC results in other, less well-studied star-forming regions.
  • The optically-dark globule IC 1396A is revealed using Spitzer images at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8, and 24 microns to be infrared-bright and to contain a set of previously unknown protostars. The mid-infrared colors of the 24 microns detected sources indicate several very young (Class I or 0) protostars and a dozen Class II stars. Three of the new sources (IC 1396A: gamma, delta, and epsilon) emit over 90% of their bolometric luminosities at wavelengths greater than 3 microns, and they are located within ~0.02 pc of the ionization front at the edge of the globule. Many of the sources have spectra that are still rising at 24 microns. The two previously-known young stars LkHa 349 a and c are both detected, with component c harboring a massive disk and component a being bare. Of order 5% of the mass of material in the globule is presently in the form of protostars in the 10^5 to 10^6 yr age range. This high star formation rate was likely triggered by radiation from a nearby O star.
  • We report Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared NICMOS observations of a remarkable low-luminosity Class I (protostellar) source in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. IRAS 04325+2402 exhibits a complex bipolar scattered light nebula. The central continuum source is resolved and may be multiple, or may be crossed by a small dust lane. Complex arcs seen in scattered light surround the central source; the physical nature of these structures is not clear, but they may reflect perturbations from multiple stellar sources or from time-dependent mass ejection. A second, resolved continuum source is found at a projected distance of approximately 1150 AU from the central region, near the edge of a nebular lobe probably produced by outflow. The images indicate that this second source is another low-luminosity young stellar object, seen nearly edge-on through a dusty disk and envelope system with disk diameter $\sim 60$ AU. We suggest that the scattered light ``streaks'' associated with this second source are limb-brightened outflow cavities in the dusty envelope, possibly perturbed by interaction with the outflow lobes of the main source. The nature of the companion is uncertain, since it is observed mostly in scattered light, but is most probably a very low mass star or brown dwarf, with a minimum luminosity of $\sim 10^{-2} \lsun$. Our results show that protostellar sources may have multiple centers of infall and non-aligned disks and outflows, even on relatively small scales.