• Using the deepest data yet obtained, we find no evidence preferring compaction-triggered quenching---where rapid increases in galaxy density truncate star formation---over a null hypothesis in which galaxies age at constant surface density ($\Sigma_e\equiv M_*/2\pi r_{e}^{2}$). Results from two fully empirical analyses and one quenching-free model calculation support this claim at all $z\leq3$: (1) Qualitatively, galaxies' mean $U-V$ colors at $6.5\lesssim\log\Sigma_e/{\rm M_\odot}\,{\rm kpc}^{-2}\lesssim10$ have reddened at rates/times correlated with $\Sigma_e$, implying that there is no density threshold at which galaxies turn red but that $\Sigma_e$ sets the pace of maturation; (2) Quantitatively, the abundance of $\log M_*/{\rm M_\odot}\geq9.4$ red galaxies never exceeds that of the total population a quenching time earlier at any $\Sigma_e$, implying that galaxies need not transit from low to high densities before quenching; (3) Applying $d\log r_{e}/dt =1/2\,d\log M_*/dt$ to a suite of lognormal star formation histories reproduces the evolution of the size--mass relation at $\log M_*\geq10$. All results are consistent with evolutionary rates being set ab initio by global densities, with denser objects evolving faster than less-dense ones towards a terminal quiescence induced by gas depletion or other $\sim$Hubble-timescale phenomena. Unless stellar ages demand otherwise, observed $\Sigma_e$ thresholds need not bear any physical relation to quenching beyond this intrinsic density--formation epoch correlation, adding to Lilly & Carollo's arguments to that effect.
  • Knowledge of galaxy evolution rests on cross-sectional observations of different objects at different times. Understanding of galaxy evolution rests on longitudinal interpretations of how these data relate to individual objects moving through time. The connection between the two is often assumed to be clear, but we use a simple "physics-free" model to show that it is not, and that exploring its nuances can yield new insights. Comprising nothing more than $2094$ loosely constrained lognormal star formation histories (SFHs), the model faithfully reproduces the following data it was not designed to match: stellar mass functions at $z\leq8$; the slope of the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (the SF "Main Sequence") at $z\leq6$; the mean ${\rm sSFR}(\equiv{\rm SFR}/M_*)$ of low-mass galaxies at $z\leq7$; "fast-" and "slow-track" quenching; downsizing; and a correlation between formation timescale and ${\rm sSFR}(M_*; t)$ similar to results from simulations that provides a natural connection to bulge growth. We take these findings---which suggest that quenching is the natural downturn of all SFHs affecting galaxies at rates/times correlated with their densities---to mean that: (1) models in which galaxies are diversified on Hubble timescales by something like initial conditions rival the dominant grow-and-quench framework as good descriptions of the data; or (2) absent spatial information, many metrics of galaxy evolution are too undiscriminating---if not inherently misleading---to confirm a unique explanation. We outline future tests of our model but stress that, even if ultimately incorrect, it illustrates how exploring different paradigms can aid learning and, we hope, more detailed modeling efforts.
  • We present the discovery of 3 quasar lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), selected using two novel photometry-based selection techniques. The J0941+0518 system, with two point sources separated by 5.46" on either side of a galaxy, has source and lens redshifts $z_s = 1.54$ and $z_l = 0.343$. The AO-assisted images of J2211+1929 show two point sources separated by 1.04", corresponding to the same quasar at $z_s = 1.07,$ besides the lens galaxy and Einstein ring. Images of J2257+2349 show two point sources separated by 1.67" on either side of an E/S0 galaxy. The extracted spectra show two images of the same quasar at redshift $z_s = 2.10$. In total, the two selection techniques identified 309 lens candidates, including 47 known lenses, and 6 previously ruled out candidates. 55 of the remaining candidates were observed using NIRC2 and ESI at Keck Observatory, EFOSC2 at the ESO-NTT (La Silla), and SAM and the Goodman spectrograph at SOAR. Of the candidates observed, 3 were confirmed as lenses, 36 were ruled out, and 16 remain inconclusive. Taking into account that we recovered known lenses, this gives us a success rate of at least 50/309 (16%). This initial campaign demonstrates the power of purely photometric selection techniques in finding lensed quasars. Developing and refining these techniques is essential for efficient identification of these rare lenses in ongoing and future photometric surveys.
  • Within one billion years of the Big Bang, intergalactic hydrogen was ionized by sources emitting ultraviolet and higher energy photons. This was the final phenomenon to globally affect all the baryons (visible matter) in the Universe. It is referred to as cosmic reionization and is an integral component of cosmology. It is broadly expected that intrinsically faint galaxies were the primary ionizing sources due to their abundance in this epoch. However, at the highest redshifts ($z>7.5$; lookback time 13.1 Gyr), all galaxies with spectroscopic confirmations to date are intrinsically bright and, therefore, not necessarily representative of the general population. Here, we report the unequivocal spectroscopic detection of a low luminosity galaxy at $z>7.5$. We detected the Lyman-$\alpha$ emission line at $\sim 10504$ {\AA} in two separate observations with MOSFIRE on the Keck I Telescope and independently with the Hubble Space Telescope's slit-less grism spectrograph, implying a source redshift of $z = 7.640 \pm 0.001$. The galaxy is gravitationally magnified by the massive galaxy cluster MACS J1423.8+2404 ($z = 0.545$), with an estimated intrinsic luminosity of $M_{AB} = -19.6 \pm 0.2$ mag and a stellar mass of $M_{\star} = 3.0^{+1.5}_{-0.8} \times 10^8$ solar masses. Both are an order of magnitude lower than the four other Lyman-$\alpha$ emitters currently known at $z > 7.5$, making it probably the most distant representative source of reionization found to date.
  • Gladders et al. have recently suggested that the star formation histories (SFHs) of individual galaxies are characterized by a log-normal function in time, implying a slow decline rather than rapid quenching. We test their conjecture on theoretical SFHs from the cosmological simulation Illustris and on observationally inferred SFHs. While the log-normal form necessarily ignores short-lived features such as starbursts, it fits the overall shape of the majority of SFHs very well. In particular, 85% of the cumulative SFHs are fitted to within a maximum error of 5% of the total stellar mass formed, and 99% to within 10%. The log-normal performs systematically better than the commonly used delayed-tau model, and is superseded only by functions with more than three free parameters. Poor fits are mostly found in galaxies that were rapidly quenched after becoming satellites. We explore the log-normal parameter space of normalization, peak time, and full width at half maximum, and find that the simulated and observed samples occupy similar regions, though Illustris predicts wider, later-forming SFHs on average. The ensemble of log-normal fits correctly reproduces complex metrics such as the evolution of Illustris galaxies across the star formation main sequence, but overpredicts their quenching timescales. SFHs in Illustris are a diverse population not determined by any one physical property of galaxies, but follow a tight relation, where $\mathrm{width}\propto\mathrm{(peak\ time)}^{3/2}$. We show that such a relation can be explained qualitatively (though not quantitatively) by a close connection between the growth of dark matter halos and their galaxies.
  • The Type~Ia supernova (SN~Ia) 2016coj in NGC 4125 (redshift $z=0.004523$) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search 4.9 days after the fitted first-light time (FFLT; 11.1 days before $B$-band maximum). Our first detection (pre-discovery) is merely $0.6\pm0.5$ day after the FFLT, making SN 2016coj one of the earliest known detections of a SN Ia. A spectrum was taken only 3.7 hr after discovery (5.0 days after the FFLT) and classified as a normal SN Ia. We performed high-quality photometry, low- and high-resolution spectroscopy, and spectropolarimetry, finding that SN 2016coj is a spectroscopically normal SN Ia, but with a high velocity of \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 ($\sim 12,600$\,\kms\ around peak brightness). The \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 velocity evolution can be well fit by a broken-power-law function for up to a month after the FFLT. SN 2016coj has a normal peak luminosity ($M_B \approx -18.9 \pm 0.2$ mag), and it reaches a $B$-band maximum \about16.0~d after the FFLT. We estimate there to be low host-galaxy extinction based on the absence of Na~I~D absorption lines in our low- and high-resolution spectra. The spectropolarimetric data exhibit weak polarization in the continuum, but the \ion{Si}{2} line polarization is quite strong ($\sim 0.9\% \pm 0.1\%$) at peak brightness.
  • (Abridged) We combine deep HST grism spectroscopy with a new Bayesian method to derive maps of gas-phase metallicity, nebular dust extinction, and star-formation rate for 10 star-forming galaxies at high redshift ($1.2<z<2.3$). Exploiting lensing magnification by the foreground cluster MACS1149.6+2223, we reach sub-kpc spatial resolution and push the stellar mass limit associated with such high-z spatially resolved measurements below $10^8M_\odot$ for the first time. Our maps exhibit diverse morphologies, indicative of various effects such as efficient radial mixing from tidal torques, rapid accretion of low-metallicity gas, etc., which can affect the gas and metallicity distributions in individual galaxies. Based upon an exhaustive sample of all existing sub-kpc metallicity gradients at high-z, we find that predictions given by analytical chemical evolution models assuming a relatively extended star-formation profile in the early disk formation phase can explain the majority of observed gradients, without involving galactic feedback or radial outflows. We observe a tentative correlation between stellar mass and metallicity gradient, consistent with the downsizing galaxy formation picture that more massive galaxies are more evolved into a later phase of disk growth, where they experience more coherent mass assembly at all radii and thus show shallower metallicity gradients. In addition, we compile a sample of homogeneously cross-calibrated integrated metallicity measurements spanning three orders of magnitude in stellar mass at $z\sim1.8$. We use this sample to study the mass-metallicity relation (MZR) and test the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The slope of the observed MZR can rule out the momentum-driven wind model at 3-$\sigma$ confidence level. We find no significant offset with respect to the FMR, taking into account the intrinsic scatter and measurement uncertainties.
  • Here we explore the evolution of galaxy ensembles at early times by writing the in situ stellar mass growth of galaxies purely as a stationary stochastic (e.g., quasi-steady state) process. By combining the mathematics of such processes with Newtonian gravity and a mean local star formation efficiency, we show that the stellar mass evolution of galaxy ensembles is directly related to the average acceleration of baryons onto dark matter halos at the onset of star formation, with explicit dependencies on initial local matter densities and halo mass. The density term specifically implies more rapid average rates of growth in higher density regions of the universe compared to low density regions, i.e., assembly bias. With this framework, using standard cosmological parameters, a mean star formation efficiency derived by other authors, and knowledge of the shape of the cosmological matter power spectrum at small scales, we analytically derive (1) the characteristic stellar masses of galaxies (M*), (2) the power-law low-mass slope (alpha) and normalization (phi*) of the stellar mass function, and (3) the evolution of the stellar mass function in time over 12.5 > z > 2. Correspondingly, the rise in the cosmic star formation rate density over these epochs, while the universe can sustain unabated fueling of star formation, also emerges naturally. All of our findings are consistent with the deepest available data, including the expectation of alpha~-7/5; i.e., a stellar mass function low-mass slope that is notably shallower than that of the halo mass function, and with no systematic deviations from a mean star formation efficiency with density or mass, nor any explicit, additional feedback mechanisms. These derivations yield a compelling richness and complexity but also show that very few astrophysical details are required to understand the evolution of cosmic ensemble of galaxies at early times.
  • We present a detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of a point source consistent with being the progenitor star of the Type IIb supernova (SN IIb) 2016gkg. Post-explosion imaging from the Keck Adaptive Optics system was used to perform relative astrometry between the Keck and HST imaging. We identify a single point source in the HST images coincident with the SN position to 0.89-sigma. The HST photometry is consistent with the progenitor star being an A0Ia star with T=9500 K and log (L/Lsun)=5.15. We find that the SN 2016gkg progenitor star appears more consistent with binary than single-star evolutionary models. In addition, early-time light curve data from SN 2016gkg revealed a rapid rise in luminosity within ~0.4 days of non-detection limits, consistent with models of the cooling phase after shock break-out. We use these data to determine an explosion date of 20.15 September 2016 and progenitor star radius of log (R/Rsun)=2.41, which agrees with photometry from the progenitor star. Our findings are also consistent with detections of other SNe IIb progenitor stars, although more luminous and bluer than most other examples.
  • We show that a model consisting of individual, log-normal star formation histories for a volume-limited sample of $z\approx0$ galaxies reproduces the evolution of the total and quiescent stellar mass functions at $z\lesssim2.5$ and stellar masses $M_*\geq10^{10}\,{\rm M_\odot}$. This model has previously been shown to reproduce the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (${\rm SFR}$--$M_*$) over the same interval, is fully consistent with the observed evolution of the cosmic ${\rm SFR}$ density at $z\leq8$, and entails no explicit "quenching" prescription. We interpret these results/features in the context of other models demonstrating a similar ability to reproduce the evolution of (1) the cosmic ${\rm SFR}$ density, (2) the total/quiescent stellar mass functions, and (3) the ${\rm SFR}$--$M_*$ relation, proposing that the key difference between modeling approaches is the extent to which they stress/address diversity in the (starforming) galaxy population. Finally, we suggest that observations revealing the timescale associated with dispersion in ${\rm SFR}(M_*)$ will help establish which models are the most relevant to galaxy evolution.
  • The slope of the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (the SFR "Main Sequence"; ${\rm SFR}-M_*$) is not quite unity: specific star formation rates $({\rm SFR}/M_*)$ are weakly-but-significantly anti-correlated with $M_*$. Here we demonstrate that this trend may simply reflect the well-known increase in bulge mass-fractions -- portions of a galaxy not forming stars -- with $M_*$. Using a large set of bulge/disk decompositions and SFR estimates derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show that re-normalizing SFR by disk stellar mass $({\rm sSFR_{\rm disk}\equiv SFR}/M_{*,{\rm disk}})$ reduces the $M_*$-dependence of SF efficiency by $\sim0.25$ dex per dex, erasing it entirely in some subsamples. Quantitatively, we find $\log {\rm sSFR_{disk}}-\log M_*$ to have a slope $\beta_{\rm disk}\in[-0.20,0.00]\pm0.02$ (depending on SFR estimator and Main Sequence definition) for star-forming galaxies with $M_*\geq10^{10}M_{\odot}$ and bulge mass-fractions $B/T\lesssim0.6$, generally consistent with a pure-disk control sample ($\beta_{\rm control}=-0.05\pm0.04$). That $\langle{\rm SFR}/M_{*,{\rm disk}}\rangle$ is (largely) independent of host mass for star-forming disks has strong implications for aspects of galaxy evolution inferred from any ${\rm SFR}-M_*$ relation, including: manifestations of "mass quenching" (bulge growth), factors shaping the star-forming stellar mass function (uniform $d\log M_*/dt$ for low-mass, disk-dominated galaxies), and diversity in star formation histories (dispersion in ${\rm SFR}(M_*,t)$). Our results emphasize the need to treat galaxies as composite systems -- not integrated masses -- in observational and theoretical work.
  • A robust prediction of $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$ cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. The correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain, however: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with $N$-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened relative to $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$ expectations at circular velocities $v_c \lesssim 200\, {\rm km\, s^{-1}}$. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role environment plays in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric $v_c$ estimators, we find no transition from a field- to $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$-shaped CVF above $v_c = 50\, {\rm km\, s^{-1}}$ as a function of group halo mass. All groups with $12.4 \lesssim \log M_{\rm halo} / M_{\odot} \lesssim 15.1$ (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs marginally suppressed at low-$v_c$ compared to that of the field. Conversely, some agreement with $N$-body results emerges for samples saturated with late-type galaxies, with isolated late-types displaying a CVF similar in shape to $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$ predictions. We conclude that the flattening of the low-$v_c$ slope in groups is due to their depressed late-type fractions -- environment affecting the CVF only to the extent that it correlates with this quantity -- and that previous cluster analyses may suffer from interloper contamination. These results serve as useful benchmarks for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.
  • Using $J$ and $K_s$ band imaging obtained as part of the IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS) we measure S\'ersic indices for 2160 field and cluster galaxies at $0.31 < z < 0.54$. Using both mass- and magnitude-limited samples, we compare the distributions for spectroscopically determined passive, continuously starforming, starburst, and poststarburst systems and show that previously established spatial and statistical connections between these types extend to their gross morphologies. Outside of cluster cores, we find close structural ties between starburst and continuously starforming, as well as poststarburst and passive types, but not between starbursts and poststarbursts. These results independently support two conclusions presented in Paper II of this ICBS series (Dressler et al.): 1) most starbursts are the product of a non-disruptive triggering mechanism that is insensitive to global environment, such as minor-mergers; 2) starbursts and poststarbursts generally represent transient phases in the lives of "normal" starforming and quiescent galaxies, respectively, originating from and returning to these systems in closed "recycling" loops. In this picture, spectroscopically identified poststarbursts constitute a minority of all recently terminated starbursts, largely ruling-out the typical starburst as a quenching event in all but the densest environments.
  • We present the discovery and a detailed multi-wavelength study of a strongly-lensed luminous infrared galaxy at z=0.816. Unlike most known lensed galaxies discovered at optical or near-infrared wavelengths this lensed source is red, r-Ks = 3.9 [AB], which the data presented here demonstrate is due to ongoing dusty star formation. The overall lensing magnification (a factor of 17) facilitates observations from the blue optical through to 500micron, fully capturing both the stellar photospheric emission as well as the re-processed thermal dust emission. We also present optical and near-IR spectroscopy. These extensive data show that this lensed galaxy is in many ways typical of IR-detected sources at z~1, with both a total luminosity and size in accordance with other (albeit much less detailed) measurements in samples of galaxies observed in deep fields with the Spitzer telescope. Its far-infrared spectral energy distribution is well-fit by local templates that are an order of magnitude less luminous than the lensed galaxy; local templates of comparable luminosity are too hot to fit. Its size (D~7kpc) is much larger than local luminous infrared galaxies, but in line with sizes observed for such galaxies at z~1. The star formation appears uniform across this spatial scale. In this source, the luminosity of which is typical of sources that dominate the cosmic infrared background, we find that star formation is spatially extended and well organised, quite unlike the compact merger-driven starbursts which are typical for sources of this luminosity at z~0.