• Recently it was shown that certain fluid-mechanical 'pilot-wave' systems can strikingly mimic a range of quantum properties, including single particle diffraction and interference, quantization of angular momentum etc. How far does this analogy go? The ultimate test of (apparent) quantumness of such systems is a Bell-test. Here the premises of the Bell inequality are re-investigated for particles accompanied by a pilot-wave, or more generally by a resonant 'background' field. We find that two of these premises, namely outcome independence and measurement independence, may not be generally valid when such a background is present. Under this assumption the Bell inequality is possibly (but not necessarily) violated. A class of hydrodynamic Bell experiments is proposed that could test this claim. Such a Bell test on fluid systems could provide a wealth of new insights on the different loopholes for Bell's theorem. Finally, it is shown that certain properties of background-based theories can be illustrated in Ising spin-lattices.
  • Usually the 'hidden variables' of Bell's theorem are supposed to describe the pair of Bell particles. Here a semantic shift is proposed, namely to attach the hidden variables to a stochastic medium or field in which the particles move. It appears that under certain conditions one of the premises of Bell's theorem, namely 'measurement independence', is not satisfied for such 'background-based' theories, even if these only involve local interactions. Such theories therefore do not fall under the restriction of Bell's no-go theorem. A simple version of such background-based models are Ising models, which we investigate here in the classical and quantum regime. We also propose to test background-based models by a straightforward extension of existing experiments. The present version corrects an error in the preceding version.
  • In a recent article Hensen et al. [Nature 526, 682 (2015)] report on a sophisticated Bell experiment, simultaneously closing, for the first time, loopholes for local hidden-variable theories (HVTs). The authors claim that 'local realism' has been refuted, under certain natural assumptions. The aim of the present Comment is twofold. First, it is urged that the class of local HVTs that is eliminated by the reported experiment should be specified in greater detail than is done by the authors. Second, it is argued that the class of local HVTs that still survives is wide and natural. For instance, hidden variables describing a 'background' field can exploit the freedom-of-choice loophole, which cannot be closed for this type of hidden variables. The dynamics of such background-based theories can be illustrated by existing systems, e.g. from fluid mechanics.
  • In a recent article Giustina et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 250401 (2015)] report on an advanced Bell experiment, simultaneously closing loopholes for local hidden-variable theories. The authors claim that 'local realism' has been refuted, unless 'truly exotic hypotheses' are made. Here I argue that a particularly wide and natural class of local hidden-variable theories survives, for instance when the hidden variables describe a background field. Such background-based theories exploit the freedom-of-choice loophole, which cannot be closed for this type of hidden variables. The dynamics of such models can be illustrated by existing systems, e.g. from fluid mechanics.
  • Recent experiments have shown that certain fluid-mechanical systems, namely oil droplets bouncing on oil films, can mimic a wide range of quantum phenomena, including double-slit interference, quantization of angular momentum and Zeeman splitting. Here I investigate what can be learned from these systems concerning no-go theorems as those of Bell and Kochen-Specker. In particular, a model for the Bell experiment is proposed that includes variables describing a 'background' field or medium. This field mimics the surface wave that accompanies the droplets in the fluid-mechanical experiments. It appears that quite generally such a model can violate the Bell inequality and reproduce the quantum statistics, even if it is based on local dynamics only. The reason is that measurement independence is not valid in such models. This opens the door for local 'background-based' theories, describing the interaction of particles and analyzers with a background field, to complete quantum mechanics. Experiments to test these ideas are also proposed.
  • In this PhD thesis the ancient question of determinism ('Does every event have a cause ?') will be re-examined. In the philosophy of science and physics communities the orthodox position states that the physical world is indeterministic: quantum events would have no causes but happen by irreducible chance. Arguably the clearest theorem that leads to this conclusion is Bell's theorem. The commonly accepted 'solution' to the theorem is 'indeterminism', in agreement with the Copenhagen interpretation. Here it is recalled that indeterminism is not really a physical but rather a philosophical hypothesis, and that it has counterintuitive and far-reaching implications. At the same time another solution to Bell's theorem exists, often termed 'superdeterminism' or 'total determinism'. Superdeterminism appears to be a philosophical position that is centuries and probably millennia old: it is for instance Spinoza's determinism. If Bell's theorem has both indeterministic and deterministic solutions, choosing between determinism and indeterminism is a philosophical question, not a matter of physical experimentation, as is widely believed. If it is impossible to use physics for deciding between both positions, it is legitimate to ask which philosophical theories are of help. Here it is argued that probability theory - more precisely the interpretation of probability - is instrumental for advancing the debate. It appears that the hypothesis of determinism allows to answer a series of precise questions from probability theory, while indeterminism remains silent for these questions. From this point of view determinism appears to be the most reasonable assumption, after all.
  • Bell's theorem admits several interpretations or 'solutions', the standard interpretation being 'indeterminism', a next one 'nonlocality'. In this article two further solutions are investigated, termed here 'superdeterminism' and 'supercorrelation'. The former is especially interesting for philosophical reasons, if only because it is always rejected on the basis of extra-physical arguments. The latter, supercorrelation, will be studied here by investigating model systems that can mimic it, namely spin lattices. It is shown that in these systems the Bell inequality can be violated, even if they are local according to usual definitions. Violation of the Bell inequality is retraced to violation of 'measurement independence'. These results emphasize the importance of studying the premises of the Bell inequality in realistic systems.
  • The aim of the article is to argue that the interpretations of quantum mechanics and of probability are much closer than usually thought. Indeed, a detailed analysis of the concept of probability (within the standard frequency theory of R. von Mises) reveals that the latter concept always refers to an observing system. The enigmatic role of the observer in the Copenhagen interpretation therefore derives from a precise understanding of probability. Besides explaining several elements of the Copenhagen interpretation, our model also allows to reinterpret recent results from 'relational quantum mechanics', and to question the premises of the 'subjective approach to quantum probabilities'.
  • In the following we revisit the frequency interpretation of probability of Richard von Mises, in order to bring the essential implicit notions in focus. Following von Mises, we argue that probability can only be defined for events that can be repeated in similar conditions, and that exhibit 'frequency stabilization'. The central idea of the present article is that the mentioned 'conditions' should be well-defined and 'partitioned'. More precisely, we will divide probabilistic systems into object, environment, and probing subsystem, and show that such partitioning allows to solve a wide variety of classic paradoxes of probability theory. As a corollary, we arrive at the surprising conclusion that at least one central idea of the orthodox interpretation of quantum mechanics is a direct consequence of the meaning of probability. More precisely, the idea that the "observer influences the quantum system" is obvious if one realizes that quantum systems are probabilistic systems; it holds for all probabilistic systems, whether quantum or classical.
  • For all Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type experiments on deterministic systems the Bell inequality holds, unless non-local interactions exist between certain parts of the setup. Here we show that in nonlinear systems the Bell inequality can be violated by non-local effects that are arbitrarily weak. Then we show that the quantum result of the existing Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type experiments can be reproduced within deterministic models that include arbitrarily weak non-local effects.