• Magnetar power is believed to be at the origin of numerous super-luminous supernovae (SNe) of Type Ic, arising from compact, hydrogen-deficient, Wolf-Rayet type stars. Here, we investigate the properties that magnetar power would have on standard-energy SNe associated with 15-20Msun blue or red supergiant (BSG/RSG) stars. We use a combination of Eulerian grey radiation-hydrodynamics and non-LTE steady-state radiative transfer to study their dynamical, photometric, and spectroscopic properties. Adopting magnetar fields of 1, 3.5, 7 x 10^14G and rotational energies of 0.4, 1, and 3 x 10^51erg, we produce bolometric light curves with a broad maximum covering 50-150d and a magnitude of 10^43-10^44erg/s. The spectra at maximum light are analogous to those of standard SNe II-P but bluer. Although the magnetar energy is channelled roughly in equal proportion between SN kinetic energy and SN luminosity, the latter may be boosted by a factor 10-100 compared to a standard SN II. This influence breaks the observed relation between brightness and expansion rate of standard Type II SNe. Magnetar energy injection also delays recombination and may even cause re-ionization, with a reversal in photospheric temperature and velocity. Depositing the magnetar energy in a narrow mass shell at the ejecta base leads to the formation of a dense shell at a few 1000km/s, which causes a light-curve bump at the end of the photospheric phase. Depositing this energy over a broad range of mass in the inner ejecta, to mimic the effect of multi-dimensional fluid instabilities, prevents the formation of a dense shell and produces an earlier-rising and smoother light curve. The magnetar influence on the SN radiation is generally not visible prior to 20-30d, during which one may discern a BSG from a RSG progenitor. We propose a magnetar model for the super-luminous Type II SN OGLE-SN14-073.
  • Transient surveys have recently revealed the existence of H-rich super-luminous supernovae (SLSN; e.g., iPTF14hls, OGLE-SN14-073) characterized by an exceptionally large time-integrated bolometric luminosity, a sustained blue optical color, and Doppler-broadened HI lines at all times. Here, I investigate the effect that a magnetar (initial rotational energy of 4x10^50erg and field strength of 7x10^13G) would have on the properties of a typical Type II SN ejecta (mass of 13.35Msun, kinetic energy of 1.32x10^51erg, 0.077Msun of 56Ni) produced by the terminal explosion of an H-rich blue-supergiant star. I present a non-LTE time-dependent radiative transfer simulation of the resulting photometric and spectroscopic evolution from 1d until 600d after explosion. With magnetar power, the model luminosity and brightness are enhanced, the ejecta is everywhere hotter and more ionised, and the spectrum formation region is much more extended. This magnetar-powered SN ejecta reproduces most of the observed properties of SLSN iPTF14hls, including the sustained brightness of -18mag in the R band, the blue optical color, and the broad HI lines for 600d. The non-extreme magnetar properties, combined with the standard Type II SN ejecta properties offer an interesting alternative to the pair-unstable super-massive star model recently proposed, which involves a highly-energetic and super-massive ejecta. Hence, such Type II SLSNe may differ from standard Type II SNe exclusively through the influence of a magnetar.
  • Massive stars with a core-halo structure are interesting objects for stellar physics and hydrodynamics. Using simulations for stellar evolution, radiation hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer, we study the explosion of stars with an extended and tenuous envelope (i.e., stars in which 95% of the mass is contained within 10% of the surface radius or less). We consider both H-rich supergiant and He-giant progenitors resulting from close-binary evolution and dying with a final mass of 2.8-5Msun. An extended envelope causes the supernova (SN) shock to brake and a reverse shock to form, sweeping core material into a dense shell. The shock deposited energy, which suffers little degradation from expansion, is trapped in ejecta layers of moderate optical depth, thereby enhancing the SN luminosity at early times. With the delayed 56Ni heating, we find that the resulting optical and near-IR light curves all exhibit a double-peak morphology. We show how an extended progenitor can explain the blue and featureless optical spectra of some Type IIb and Ib SNe. The dense shell formed by the reverse shock leads to line profiles with a smaller and near-constant width. This ejecta property can explain the statistically narrower profiles of Type IIb compared to Type Ib SNe, as well as the peculiar Halpha profile seen in SN1993J. At early times, our He-giant star explosion model shows a high luminosity, a blue color, and featureless spectra reminiscent of the Type Ib SN2008D, suggesting a low-mass progenitor.
  • While Chandrasekhar-mass ($M_{\rm Ch}$) models with a low $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ yield can match the peak luminosities of fast-declining, 91bg-like Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), they systematically fail to reproduce their faster light-curve evolution. Here we illustrate the impact of a low ejecta mass on the radiative display of low-luminosity SNe Ia, by comparing a sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model resulting from the pure central detonation of a C-O White Dwarf (WD) to a $M_{\rm Ch}$ delayed-detonation model with the same $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ yield of 0.12 M$_{\odot}$. Our sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model from a 0.90 M$_{\odot}$ WD progenitor has a $\sim$5 day shorter rise time in the integrated UV-optical-IR (uvoir) luminosity, as well as in the $B$-band, and a $\sim$20 per cent higher peak uvoir luminosity ($\sim$1 mag brighter peak $M_B$). This sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model also displays bluer maximum-light colours due to the larger specific heating rate, and larger post-maximum uvoir and $B$-band decline rates. The luminosity decline at nebular times is also more pronounced, reflecting the enhanced escape of gamma rays resulting from the lower density of the progenitor WD. The deficit of stable nickel in the innermost ejecta leads to a notable absence of forbidden lines of [Ni II] in the nebular spectra. In contrast, the $M_{\rm Ch}$ model displays a strong line due to [Ni II] 1.939 $\mu\rm{m}$, which could in principle serve to distinguish between different progenitor scenarios. Our sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model offers an unprecedented agreement with optical and near-infrared observations of the 91bg-like SN 1999by, making a strong case for a WD progenitor significantly below the Chandrasekhar-mass limit for this event and other low-luminosity SNe Ia.
  • We present one-dimensional non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer simulations (using CMFGEN) of two sub-Chandrasekhar (sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$), one $M_{\rm Ch}$ and one super-$M_{\rm Ch}$ Type Ia SN ejecta models. Three originate from $M_{\rm Ch}$ delayed detonation models, and the fourth is a sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ detonation model. Ejecta masses are 1.02, 1.04, 1.40, and 1.70 M$_\odot$, and all models have 0.62 M$_\odot$ of $^{56}{\rm Ni}$. Sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ model light curves evolve faster, reaching bolometric maximum 2--3 days earlier and having 3--4 days shorter bolometric half light widths. The models vary by $\sim$12 per cent at maximum bolometric luminosity and by 0.17 mag in $B_{\rm max}$. While $\Delta M_{15}(B)$ increases with ejecta mass it only varies by $\sim$5 per cent around 1 mag. Sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ models are 0.25 mag bluer in $B-R$ at $B_{\rm max}$. Optical spectra share many similarities, but lower mass models exhibit less UV line blanketing during the photospheric phase. At nebular times, significant NIR spectroscopic differences are seen. In particular, emission lines of the Ca II NIR triplet; [S III] $\lambda\lambda$9068,9530; [Ca II] $\lambda\lambda$7291,7324; [Ar III] $\lambda\lambda$7135,7751; and [Ni II] 1.939 $\mu$m are stronger in higher mass models. The [Ni II] 1.939 $\mu$m line is absent in the sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ detonation model, and provides a valuable potential tool to distinguish sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ explosions from $M_{\rm Ch}$ explosions. In general, the nebular phase models are too highly ionized. We attribute this to the neglect of clumping and/or the distribution of intermediate mass and iron group elements. The two sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ models, while exploded by different mechanisms, can be distinguished in the $J$ and $H$ bands at late times (e.g., $+200$ days).
  • The progenitors of low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) are believed to be red supergiant (RSG) stars, but there is much disparity in the literature concerning their mass at core collapse and therefore on the main sequence. Here, we model the SN radiation arising from the low-energy explosion of RSG stars of 12, 25, and 27 M$_{\odot}$ on the main sequence and formed through single star evolution. Despite the narrow range in ejecta kinetic energy (2.5$-$4.2$\times$10$^{50}$ erg) in our model set, the SN observables from our three models are significantly distinct, reflecting the differences in progenitor structure (e.g., surface radius, H-rich envelope mass, He-core mass). Our higher mass RSG stars give rise to Type II SNe that tend to have bluer colors at early times, a shorter photospheric phase, and a faster declining $V$-band light curve (LC) more typical of Type II-linear SNe, in conflict with the LC plateau observed for low-luminosity SNe II. The complete fallback of the CO core in the low-energy explosions of our high mass RSG stars prevents the ejection of any ${}^{56}$Ni (nor any core O or Si), in contrast to low-luminosity SNe II-P, which eject at least 0.001 M$_{\odot}$ of ${}^{56}$Ni. In contrast to observations, type II SN models from higher mass RSGs tend to show an H$\alpha$ absorption that remains broad at late times (due to a larger velocity at the base of the H-rich envelope). In agreement with the analyses of pre-explosion photometry, we conclude that low-luminosity SNe II-P likely arise from low-mass rather than high-mass RSG stars.
  • We present an analysis of observed trends and correlations between a large range of spectral and photometric parameters of more than 100 type II supernovae (SNe~II), during the photospheric phase. We define a common epoch for all SNe of 50 days post-explosion where the majority of the sample is likely to be under similar physical conditions. Several correlation matrices are produced to search for interesting trends between more than 30 distinct light-curve and spectral properties that characterize the diversity of SNe~II. Overall, SNe with higher expansion velocities are brighter, have more rapidly declining light-curves, shorter plateau durations, and higher $^{56}$Ni masses. Using a larger sample than previous studies, we argue that `$Pd$' - the plateau duration from the transition of the initial to `plateau' decline rates to the end of the `plateau' - is a better indicator of the hydrogen envelope mass than the traditionally used optically thick phase duration ($OPTd$: explosion epoch to end of plateau). This argument is supported by the fact that $Pd$ also correlates with s$_3$, the light-curve decline rate at late times: lower $Pd$ values correlate with larger s$_3$ decline rates. Large s$_3$ decline rates are likely related to lower envelope masses that enables gamma-ray escape. We also find a significant anticorrelation between $Pd$ and s$_2$ (the plateau decline rate), confirming the long standing hypothesis that faster declining SNe~II (SNe~IIL) are the result of explosions with lower hydrogen envelope masses and therefore have shorter $Pd$ values.
  • We present 888 visual-wavelength spectra of 122 nearby type II supernovae (SNe II) obtained between 1986 and 2009, and ranging between 3 and 363 days post explosion. In this first paper, we outline our observations and data reduction techniques, together with a characterization based on the spectral diversity of SNe~II. A statistical analysis of the spectral matching technique is discussed as an alternative to non-detection constraints for estimating SN explosion epochs. The time evolution of spectral lines is presented and analysed in terms of how this differs for SNe of different photometric, spectral, and environmental properties: velocities, pseudo-equivalent widths, decline rates, magnitudes, time durations, and environment metallicity. Our sample displays a large range in ejecta expansion velocities, from $\sim9600$ to $\sim1500$ km s$^{-1}$ at 50 days post explosion with a median H$_{\alpha}$ value of 7300 km s$^{-1}$. This is most likely explained through differing explosion energies. Significant diversity is also observed in the absolute strength of spectral lines, characterised through their pseudo-equivalent widths. This implies significant diversity in both temperature evolution (linked to progenitor radius) and progenitor metallicity between different SNe~II. Around 60\% of our sample show an extra absorption component on the blue side of the H$_{\alpha}$ P-Cygni profile ("Cachito" feature) between 7 and 120 days since explosion. Studying the nature of Cachito, we conclude that these features at early times (before $\sim35$ days) are associated with \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda6355$, while past the middle of the plateau phase they are related to high velocity (HV) features of hydrogen lines.
  • The faster light-curve evolution of low-luminosity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) suggests that they could result from the explosion of white dwarf (WD) progenitors below the Chandrasekhar mass ($M_{\rm Ch}$). Here we present 1D non-LTE time-dependent radiative transfer simulations of pure central detonations of carbon-oxygen WDs with a mass ($M_\rm{tot}$) between 0.88 M$_{\odot}$ and 1.15 M$_{\odot}$, and a $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ yield between 0.08 M$_{\odot}$ and 0.84 M$_{\odot}$. Their lower ejecta density compared to $M_{\rm Ch}$ models results in a more rapid increase of the luminosity at early times and an enhanced $\gamma$-ray escape fraction past maximum light. Consequently, their bolometric light curves display shorter rise times and larger post-maximum decline rates. Moreover, the higher $M(^{56}\rm{Ni})/M_\rm{tot}$ ratio at a given $^{56}\rm{Ni}$ mass enhances the temperature and ionization level in the spectrum-formation region for the less luminous models, giving rise to bluer colours at maximum light and a faster post-maximum evolution of the $B-V$ colour. For sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ models fainter than $M_B\approx -18.5$ mag at peak, the greater bolometric decline and faster colour evolution lead to a larger $B$-band post-maximum decline rate, $\Delta M_{15}(B)$. In particular, all of our previously-published $M_{\rm Ch}$ models (standard and pulsational delayed detonations) are confined to $\Delta M_{15}(B) < 1.4$ mag, while the sub-$M_{\rm Ch}$ models with $M_\rm{tot}\lesssim 1$ M$_{\odot}$ extend beyond this limit to $\Delta M_{15}(B)\approx 1.65$ mag for a peak $M_B\approx -17$ mag, in better agreement with the observed width-luminosity relation (WLR). Regardless of the precise ignition mechanism, these simulations suggest that fast-declining SNe Ia at the faint end of the WLR could result from the explosion of WDs whose mass is significantly below the Chandrasekhar limit.
  • Early-time observations of the Type II supernovae (SNe) 2013cu and 2013fs have revealed an interaction of ejecta with material near the star surface. Unlike the Type IIn SN2010jl, which interacts with a dense wind for ~1yr, the interaction ebbs after 2-3d, suggesting a dense and compact circumstellar envelope. Here, we use multi-group radiation-hydrodynamics and non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium radiative transfer to explore the properties of red supergiant (RSG) star explosions embedded in a variety of dense envelopes. We consider the cases of an extended static atmosphere or a steady-state wind, adopting a range of mass loss rates. The shock-breakout signal, the SN radiation up to 10d, and the ejecta dynamics are strongly influenced by the properties of this nearby environment. This compromises the use of early-time observations to constrain Rstar. The presence of narrow lines for 2-3d in 2013fs and 2013cu require a cocoon of material of ~0.01Msun out to 5-10Rstar. Spectral lines evolve from electron-scattering to Doppler broadened, with a growing blueshift of their emission peaks. Recent studies propose a super-wind phase with a mass loss rate from 0.001 up to 1Msun/yr in the last months/years of the RSG life, although there is no observational constraint that this external material is a steady-state outflow. Alternatively, observations may be explained by the explosion of a RSG star inside its complex atmosphere. Indeed, spatially resolved observations reveal that RSG stars have extended atmospheres, with the presence of downflows and upflows out to several Rstar, even in a standard RSG like Betelgeuse. Mass loading in the region intermediate between star and wind can accommodate the 0.01Msun needed to explain the observations of 2013fs. A puzzling super-wind phase prior to core-collapse may be therefore superfluous [Abridged].
  • Using 1-D non-Local-Thermodynamic-Equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations, we study the ejecta properties required to match the early and late-time photometric and spectroscopic properties of supernovae (SNe) associated with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs). To match the short rise time, narrow light curve peak, and extremely broad spectral lines of SN1998bw requires a model with <3Msun ejecta but a high explosion energy of a few 1e52erg and 0.5Msun of Ni56. However the relatively high luminosity, the presence of narrow spectral lines of intermediate mass elements, and the low ionization at the nebular stage are matched with a more standard C-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star explosion, with an ejecta of >10Msun, an explosion energy >1e51erg, and only 0.1Msun of Ni56. As the two models are mutually exclusive, the breaking of spherical symmetry is essential to match the early/late photometric/spectroscopic properties of SN1998bw. This conclusion confirms the notion that the ejecta of SN1998bw is aspherical on large scales. More generally, with asphericity, the energetics and Ni56 mass of LGRB/SNe are reduced and their ejecta mass is increased, favoring a massive fast-rotating Wolf-Rayet star progenitor. Contrary to persisting claims in favor of the proto-magnetar model for LGRB/SNe, such progenitor/ejecta properties are compatible with collapsar formation. Ejecta properties of LGRB/SNe inferred from 1D radiative-transfer modeling are fundamentally flawed.
  • We substantially update the capabilities of the open-source software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). MESA can now simultaneously evolve an interacting pair of differentially rotating stars undergoing transfer and loss of mass and angular momentum, greatly enhancing the prior ability to model binary evolution. New MESA capabilities in fully coupled calculation of nuclear networks with hundreds of isotopes now allow MESA to accurately simulate advanced burning stages needed to construct supernova progenitor models. Implicit hydrodynamics with shocks can now be treated with MESA, enabling modeling of the entire massive star lifecycle, from pre-main sequence evolution to the onset of core collapse and nucleosynthesis from the resulting explosion. Coupling of the GYRE non-adiabatic pulsation instrument with MESA allows for new explorations of the instability strips for massive stars while also accelerating the astrophysical use of asteroseismology data. We improve treatment of mass accretion, giving more accurate and robust near-surface profiles. A new MESA capability to calculate weak reaction rates "on-the-fly" from input nuclear data allows better simulation of accretion induced collapse of massive white dwarfs and the fate of some massive stars. We discuss the ongoing challenge of chemical diffusion in the strongly coupled plasma regime, and exhibit improvements in MESA that now allow for the simulation of radiative levitation of heavy elements in hot stars. We close by noting that the MESA software infrastructure provides bit-for-bit consistency for all results across all the supported platforms, a profound enabling capability for accelerating MESA's development.
  • Supernova (SN) 2008bk is a well observed low-luminosity Type II event visually associated with a low-mass red-supergiant progenitor. To model SN 2008bk, we evolve a 12Msun star from the main sequence until core collapse, when it has a total mass of 9.88Msun, a He-core mass of 3.22Msun, and a radius of 502Rsun. We then artificially trigger an explosion that produces 8.29Msun of ejecta with a total energy of 2.5x10^50erg and ~0.009Msun of 56Ni. We model the subsequent evolution of the ejecta with non-Local-Thermodynamic-Equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer. Although somewhat too luminous and energetic, this model reproduces satisfactorily the multi-band light curves and multi-epoch spectra of SN 2008bk, confirming the suitability of a low-mass massive star progenitor. As in other low-luminosity SNe II, the structured Halpha profile at the end of the plateau phase is probably caused by BaII 6496.9A rather than asphericity. We discuss the sensitivity of our results to changes in progenitor radius and mass, as well as chemical mixing. A 15% increase in progenitor radius causes a 15% increase in luminosity and a 0.2mag V-band brightening of the plateau but leaves its length unaffected. An increase in ejecta mass by 10% lengthens the plateau by ~10d. Chemical mixing introduces slight changes to the bolometric light curve, limited to the end of the plateau, but has a large impact on colours and spectra at nebular times.
  • We explore the variation in single star 15-30 $\rm{M}_{\odot}$, non-rotating, solar metallicity, pre-supernova MESA models due to changes in the number of isotopes in a fully-coupled nuclear reaction network and adjustments in the mass resolution. Within this two-dimensional plane we quantitatively detail the range of core masses at various stages of evolution, mass locations of the main nuclear burning shells, electron fraction profiles, mass fraction profiles, burning lifetimes, stellar lifetimes, and compactness parameter at core-collapse for models with and without mass loss. Up to carbon burning we generally find mass resolution has a larger impact on the variations than the number of isotopes, while the number of isotopes plays a more significant role in determining the span of the variations for neon, oxygen and silicon burning. Choice of mass resolution dominates the variations in the structure of the intermediate convection zone and secondary convection zone during core and shell hydrogen burning respectively, where we find a minimum mass resolution of $\approx$ 0.01 $\rm{M}_{\odot}$ is necessary to achieve convergence in the helium core mass at the $\approx$5% level. On the other hand, at the onset of core-collapse we find $\approx$30% variations in the central electron fraction and mass locations of the main nuclear burning shells, a minimum of $\approx$127 isotopes is needed to attain convergence of these values at the $\approx$10% level.
  • We present 1-D non-Local-Thermodynamic-Equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for a large grid of supernovae (SNe) IIb/Ib/Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Our sample covers ejecta masses $M_{\rm e}$ of 1.7$-$5.2M$_\odot$, kinetic energies $E_{\rm kin}$ of 0.6$-$5.0$\times$10$^{51}$erg, and $^{56}$Ni masses of 0.05$-$0.30M$_\odot$. We find a strong correlation between the $^{56}$Ni mass and the photometric properties at maximum, and between the rise time to bolometric maximum and the post-maximum decline rate. We confirm the small scatter in ($V-R$) at 10d past $R$-band maximum. The quantity $V_{\rm m} \equiv \sqrt{2E_{\rm kin}/M_{\rm e}}$ is comparable to the Doppler velocity measured from HeI 5875\AA\ at maximum in SNe IIb/Ib, although some scatter arises from the uncertain level of chemical mixing. The OI7772\AA\ line may be used for SNe Ic, but the correspondence deteriorates with higher ejecta mass/energy. We identify a temporal reversal of the Doppler velocity at maximum absorption in the $\sim$1.05$\mu$m feature in all models. The reversal is due to HeI alone and could serve as a test for the presence of helium in SNe Ic. Because of variations in composition and ionisation, the ejecta opacity shows substantial variations with both velocity and time. This is in part the origin of the offset between our model light curves and the predictions from the Arnett model.
  • Some interacting supernovae (SNe) of type IIn show a sizeable continuum polarisation suggestive of a large scale asymmetry in the circumstellar medium (CSM) and/or the SN ejecta. Here, we extend the recent work of Dessart et al. on super-luminous SNe IIn and perform axially-symmetric (i.e., 2D) multi-group radiation hydrodynamics simulations to explore the impact of an imposed large scale density asymmetry. When the CSM is asymmetric, the latitudinal variation of the radial optical depth $\tau$ introduces a strong flux redistribution from the higher-density CSM regions, where the shock luminosity is larger, towards the lower-density CSM regions where photons escape more freely --- this redistribution ceases when $\tau<$1. Along directions where the CSM density is larger, the shock deceleration is stronger and its progression slower, producing a non-spherical cold-dense shell (CDS). For an oblate CSM density distribution, the photosphere (CDS) has an oblate (prolate) morphology when $\tau>$1. When the CSM is symmetric and the ejecta asymmetric, the flux redistribution within the CSM now tends to damp the latitudinal variation of the luminosity at the shock. It then requires a larger ejecta asymmetry to produce a sizeable latitudinal variation in the emergent flux. When the interaction is between a SN ejecta and a relic disk, the luminosity boost at early times scales with the disk opening angle -- forming a super-luminous SN IIn this way requires an unrealistically thick disk. In contrast, interaction with a disk of modest thickness/mass can yield a power that rivals radioactive decay of a standard SN II at nebular times.
  • Using radiation-hydrodynamics and radiative-transfer simulations, we explore the origin of the spectral diversity of interacting supernovae (SNe) of type IIn. We revisit SN1994W and investigate the dynamical configurations that can give rise to spectra with narrow lines at all times. We find that a standard ~10Msun 10^51erg SN ejecta ramming into a 0.4Msun dense CSM is inadequate for SN1994W, as it leads to the appearance of broad lines at late times. This structure, however, generates spectra that exhibit the key morphological changes seen in SN1998S. For SN1994W, we consider a completely different configuration, which involves the interaction at a large radius of a low mass inner shell with a high mass outer shell. Such a structure may arise in an 8-12Msun star from a nuclear flash (e.g., of Ne) followed within a few years by core collapse. Our simulations show that the large mass of the outer shell leads to the complete braking of the inner shell material, the formation of a slow dense shell, and the powering of a luminous SN IIn, even for a low inner shell energy. Early on, our model line profiles are typical of SNe IIn, exhibiting narrow cores and broad electron-scattering wings. As observed in SN1994W, they also remain narrow at late times. Our SN1994W model invokes two low energy ejections, both atypical of observed massive stars, and illustrates the diversity of configurations leading to SNe IIn. These results also highlight the importance of spectra to constrain the dynamical properties and understand the origin of SNe IIn.
  • Dessart et al., demonstrated that type II supernova (SN II) model spectra present increasing metal line strength with increasing progenitor metallicity. To confront these models with observations, we obtained a large sample of SN II host HII region emission line spectroscopy. We show that inferred SN II host HII region metallicities have a statistically significant correlation with the strength of SN II metal lines, specifically FeII 5018A.
  • We present 1-D non-Local-Thermodynamic-Equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for supernovae (SNe) of type IIb, Ib, and Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Here, we select three ejecta with a total kinetic energy of ~1.2e51erg, but characterised by different ejecta masses (2-5Msun), composition, and chemical mixing. The type IIb/Ib models correspond to the progenitors that have retained their He-rich shell at the time of explosion. The type Ic model arises from a progenitor that has lost its helium shell, but retains 0.32Msun of helium in a CO-rich core of 5.11Msun. We discuss their photometric and spectroscopic properties during the first 2-3 months after explosion, and connect these to their progenitor and ejecta properties including chemical stratification. For these three models, Arnett's rule overestimates the 56Ni mass by ~50% while the procedure of Katz et al., based on an energy argument, yields a more reliable estimate. The presence of strong CI lines around 9000A prior to maximum is an indicator that the pre-SN star was under-abundant in helium. As noted by others, the 1.08micron feature is a complex blend of CI, MgII, and HeI lines, which makes the identification of He uncertain in SNe Ibc unless other HeI lines can be identified. Our models show little scatter in (V-R) colour 10d after R-band maximum. We also address a number of radiative transfer properties of SNe Ibc, including the notion of a photosphere, the inference of a representative ejecta expansion rate, spectrum formation, blackbody fits and "correction factors".
  • We present numerical simulations that include 1-D Eulerian multi-group radiation-hydrodynamics, 1-D non-LTE radiative transfer, and 2-D polarised radiative transfer for super-luminous interacting supernovae (SNe). Our reference model is a ~10Msun inner shell with 10^51erg ramming into a ~3Msun cold outer shell (the circumstellar-medium, or CSM) that extends from 10^15cm to 2x10^16cm and moves at 100km/s. We discuss the light curve evolution, which cannot be captured adequately with a grey approach. In these interactions, the shock-crossing time through the optically-thick CSM is much longer than the photon diffusion time. Radiation is thus continuously leaking from the shock through the CSM, in disagreement with the shell-shocked model that is often invoked. Our spectra redden with time, with a peak distribution in the near-UV during the first month gradually shifting to the optical range over the following year. Initially Balmer lines exhibit a narrow line core and the broad line wings that are characteristic of electron scattering in the SNe IIn atmospheres (CSM). At later times they also exhibit a broad blue shifted component which arises from the cold dense shell. Our model results are broadly consistent with the bolometric light curve and spectral evolution observed for SN2010jl. Invoking a prolate pole-to-equator density ratio in the CSM, we can also reproduce the ~2% continuum polarisation, and line depolarisation, observed in SN2010jl. By varying the inner shell kinetic energy and the mass and extent of the outer shell, a large range of peak luminosities and durations, broadly compatible with super-luminous SNe IIn like 2010jl or 2006gy, can be produced.
  • We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations of a Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation model which synthesizes 0.51 Msun of 56Ni, and confront our results to the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2002bo over the first 100 days of its evolution. Assuming only homologous expansion, this same model reproduces the bolometric and multi-band light curves, the secondary near-infrared (NIR) maxima, and the optical and NIR spectra. The chemical stratification of our model qualitatively agrees with previous inferences by Stehle et al., but reveals significant quantitative differences for both iron-group and intermediate-mass elements. We show that +/-0.1 Msun (i.e., +/-20 per cent) variations in 56Ni mass have a modest impact on the bolometric and colour evolution of our model. One notable exception is the U-band, where a larger abundance of iron-group elements results in less opaque ejecta through ionization effects, our model with more 56Ni displaying a higher near-UV flux level. In the NIR range, such variations in 56Ni mass affect the timing of the secondary maxima but not their magnitude, in agreement with observational results. Moreover, the variation in the I, J, and K_s magnitudes is less than 0.1 mag within ~10 days from bolometric maximum, confirming the potential of NIR photometry of SNe Ia for cosmology. Overall, the delayed-detonation mechanism in single Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf progenitors seems well suited for SN 2002bo and similar SNe Ia displaying a broad Si II 6355 A line. Whatever multidimensional processes are at play during the explosion leading to these events, they must conspire to produce an ejecta comparable to our spherically-symmetric model.
  • We present non-LTE time-dependent radiative transfer simulations for ejecta produced by the detonation of an helium shell at the surface of a low-mass carbon/oxygen white dwarf (WD). This mechanism is one possible origin for supernovae (SNe) with faint and fast-decaying light curves, such as .Ia SNe and Ca-rich transients. Our initial ejecta conditions at 1d are given by the 0.18B explosion model COp45HEp2 of Waldman et al.. The 0.2Msun ejecta initially contains 0.11Msun of He, 0.03Msun of Ca, and 0.03Msun of Ti. We obtain a ~5d rise to a bolometric maximum of 3.59x10^41 erg/s, primarily powered by 48V decay. Multi-band light curves show distinct morphologies, with a rise to maximum magnitude (-14.3 to -16.7mag) that varies between 3 to 9d from the U to the K bands. Near-IR light curves show no secondary maximum. Because of the presence of both HeI and SiII lines at early times we obtain a hybrid Type Ia/Ib classification. During the photospheric phase line blanketing is caused primarily by TiII. At nebular times, the spectra show strong CaII lines in the optical (but no [OI] 6300--6364A emission), and TiII in the near-IR. Overall, these results match qualitatively the very disparate properties of .Ia SNe and Ca-rich transients. Although the strong TiII blanketing and red colors that we predict are rarely observed, they are seen, for example, in OGLE-2013- SN-079. Furthermore, we obtain a faster light-curve evolution than, for example, PTF10iuv, indicating an ejecta mass >0.2Msun. An alternate scenario may be the merger of two WDs, one or both composed of He.
  • We explore the physics of SN Ia light curves and spectra using the 1-D non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer code CMFGEN. Rather than adjusting ejecta properties to match observations, we select as input one "standard" 1-D Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation hydrodynamical model, and then explore the sensitivity of radiation and gas properties on radiative-transfer modeling assumptions. The correct computation of SN Ia radiation is not exclusively a solution to an "opacity problem", characterized by the treatment of a large number of lines. It is also key to treat important atomic processes consistently. Besides handling line blanketing in non-LTE, we show that including forbidden line transitions of metals is increasingly important for the temperature and ionization of the gas beyond maximum light. Non-thermal ionization and excitation are also critical since they affect the color evolution and the Delta-M15 of our model. While impacting little the bolometric luminosity, a more complete treatment of decay routes leads to enhanced line blanketing, e.g., associated with 48Ti in the U and B bands. Overall, we find that SN Ia radiation properties are influenced in a complicated way by the atomic data we employ, so that obtaining converged results is a challenge. We nonetheless obtain a good match to the golden standard type Ia SN 2005cf in the optical and near-IR, from 5 to 60d after explosion, suggesting that assuming spherical symmetry is not detrimental to SN Ia radiative-transfer modeling at these times. Multi-D effects no doubt matter, but they are perhaps less important than accurately treating non-LTE processes [abridged].
  • Observations of SN 2011fe at early times reveal an evolution analogous to a fireball model of constant color. In contrast, our unmixed delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs (DDC series) exhibit a faster brightening concomitant with a shift in color to the blue. In this paper, we study the origin of these discrepancies. We find that strong chemical mixing largely resolves the photometric mismatch at early times, but it leads to an enhanced line broadening that contrasts, for example, with the markedly narrow SiII6355A line of SN 2011fe. We also explore an alternative configuration with pulsational-delayed detonations (PDDEL model series). Because of the pulsation, PDDEL models retain more unburnt carbon, have little mass at high velocity, and have a much hotter outer ejecta after the explosion. The pulsation does not influence the inner ejecta, so PDDEL and DDC models exhibit similar radiative properties beyond maximum. However, at early times, PDDEL models show bluer optical colors and a higher luminosity, even for weak mixing. Their early-time radiation is derived primarily from the initial shock-deposited energy in the outer ejecta rather than radioactive decay heating. Furthermore, PDDEL models show short-lived CII lines, reminiscent of SN 2013dy. They typically exhibit lines that are weaker, narrower, and of near-constant width, reminiscent of SN 2011fe. In addition to multi-dimensional effects, varying configurations for such ``pulsations" offer a source of spectral diversity amongst SNe Ia. PDDEL and DDC models also provide one explanation for low- and high-velocity gradient SNe Ia.
  • The high metal content and fast expansion of supernova (SN) Ia ejecta lead to considerable line overlap in their optical spectra. Uncertainties in composition and ionization further complicate the process of line identification. In this paper, we focus on the 5900A emission feature seen in SN Ia spectra after bolometric maximum, a line which in the last two decades has been associated with [CoIII]5888A or NaID. Using non-LTE time-dependent radiative-transfer calculations based on Chandrasekhar-mass delayed-detonation models, we find that NaID line emission is extremely weak at all post-maximum epochs. Instead, we predict the presence of [CoIII]5888A after maximum in all our SN Ia models, which cover a range from 0.12 to 0.87Msun of 56Ni. We also find that the [CoIII]5888A forbidden line is present within days of bolometric maximum, and strengthens steadily for weeks thereafter. Both predictions are confirmed by observations. Rather than trivial taxonomy, these findings confirm that it is necessary to include forbidden-line transitions in radiative-transfer simulations of SNe Ia, both to obtain the correct ejecta cooling rate and to match observed optical spectra.