• Carrier recombination dynamics in strip silicon nano-waveguides is analyzed through time-resolved pump-and-probe experiments, revealing a complex recombination dynamics at densities ranging from ${10^{14}}$ to ${10^{17}}\,$cm$^{{-3}}$. Our results show that the carrier lifetime varies as recombination evolves, with faster decay rates at the initial stages (with lifetime of ${\sim 800}\,$ps), and much slower lifetimes at later stages (up to ${\sim 300}\,$ns). We also observe experimentally the effect of trapping, manifesting as a decay curve highly dependent on the initial carrier density. We further demonstrate that operating at high carrier density can lead to faster recombination rates. Finally, we present a theoretical discussion based on trap-assisted recombination statistics applied to nano-waveguides. Our results can impact the dynamics of several nonlinear nanophotonic devices in which free-carriers play a critical role, and open further opportunities to enhance the performance of all-optical silicon-based devices based on carrier recombination engineering.
  • Significant effort in optical-fiber research has been put in recent years into realizing mode-division multiplexing (MDM) in conjunction with wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) to enable further scaling of the communication bandwidth per fiber. In contrast almost all integrated photonics operate exclusively in the single-mode regime. MDM is rarely considered for integrated photonics due to the difficulty in coupling selectively to high-order modes which usually results in high inter-modal crosstalk. Here we show the first demonstration of simultaneous on-chip mode and wavelength division multiplexing with low modal crosstalk and loss. Our approach can potentially increase the aggregate data rate by many times for on-chip ultra-high bandwidth communications.
  • We present a new technique for the design of transformation-optics devices based on large-scale optimization to achieve the optimal effective isotropic dielectric materials within prescribed index bounds, which is computationally cheap because transformation optics circumvents the need to solve Maxwell's equations at each step. We apply this technique to the design of multimode waveguide bends (realized experimentally in a previous paper) and mode squeezers, in which all modes are transported equally without scattering. In addition to the optimization, a key point is the identification of the correct boundary conditions to ensure reflectionless coupling to untransformed regions while allowing maximum flexibility in the optimization. Many previous authors in transformation optics used a certain kind of quasiconformal map which overconstrained the problem by requiring that the entire boundary shape be specified a priori while at the same time underconstraining the problem by employing "slipping" boundary conditions that permit unwanted interface reflections.
  • The promise of perfect imaging in the optical domain, where light can be imaged without aberrations and with ultra-high resolution, could revolutionize technology and nanofabrication [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Recently it has been shown theoretically that perfect imaging can be achieved in a dielectric medium with spatially varying refractive index [7, 8]. The lens geometry is defined using transformation optics [9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15] for projecting a spherical space onto a real plane space, forming Maxwells fish eye [16, 17, 18, 19]. Most transformation optics demonstrations have been achieved for Euclidean spaces and in the microwave regime, due to ease of fabrication. Here we demonstrate a transformation to a non-Euclidean space [20] in the optical regime using silicon nanophotonic structures.
  • The ability to render objects invisible using a cloak - not detectable by an external observer - for concealing objects has been a tantalizing goal1-6. Here, we demonstrate a cloak operating in the near infrared at a wavelength of 1550 nm. The cloak conceals a deformation on a flat reflecting surface, under which an object can be hidden. The device has an area of 225 um2 and hides a region of 1.6 um2. It is composed of nanometre size silicon structures with spatially varying densities across the cloak. The density variation is defined using transformation optics to define the effective index distribution of the cloak.