• In this work we discuss observational aspects of three time-dependent parameterisations of the dark energy equation of state $w(z)$. In order to determine the dynamics associated with these models, we calculate their background evolution and perturbations in a scalar field representation. After performing a complete treatment of linear perturbations, we also show that the non-linear contribution of the selected $w(z)$ parameterisations to the matter power spectra is almost the same for all scales, with no significant difference from the predictions of the standard $\Lambda$CDM model.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We study the effects of sample variance in N--body simulations, as a function of the size of the simulation box, namely in connection with predictions on tomographic shear spectra. We make use of a set of 8 $\Lambda$CDM simulations in boxes of 128, 256, 512 $h^{-1}$Mpc aside, for a total of 24, differing just by the initial seeds. Among the simulations with 128 and 512 $h^{-1}$Mpc aside, we suitably select those closest and farthest from {\it average}. Numerical and linear spectra $P(k,z)$ are suitably connected at low $k$ so to evaluate the effects of sample variance on shear spectra $C_{ij}(\ell)$ for 5 or 10 tomographic bands. We find that shear spectra obtained by using 128 $h^{-1}$Mpc simulations can vary up to $\sim 25\, \%$, just because of the seed. Sample variance lowers to $\sim 3.3\, \%$, when using 512 $h^{-1}$Mpc. These very percentages could however slightly vary, if other sets of the same number of realizations were considered. Accordingly, in order to match the $\sim 1\, \%$ precision expected for data, if still using 8 boxes, we require a size $\sim 1300$ --$ 1700 \, h^{-1}$ Mpc for them.
  • We present the first numerical simulations in coupled dark energy cosmologies with high enough resolution to investigate the effects of the coupling on galactic and sub-galactic scales. We choose two constant couplings and a time-varying coupling function and we run simulations of three Milky-Way-size halos ($\sim$10$^{12}$M$_{\odot}$), a lower mass halo (6$\times$10$^{11}$M$_{\odot}$) and a dwarf galaxy halo (5$\times$10$^{9}$M$_{\odot}$). We resolve each halo with several millions dark matter particles. On all scales the coupling causes lower halo concentrations and a reduced number of substructures with respect to LCDM. We show that the reduced concentrations are not due to different formation times, but they are related to the extra terms that appear in the equations describing the gravitational dynamics. On the scale of the Milky Way satellites, we show that the lower concentrations can help in reconciling observed and simulated rotation curves, but the coupling values necessary to have a significant difference from LCDM are outside the current observational constraints. On the other hand, if other modifications to the standard model allowing a higher coupling (e.g. massive neutrinos) are considered, coupled dark energy can become an interesting scenario to alleviate the small-scale issues of the LCDM model.
  • The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provides a remarkable window onto the early universe, revealing its composition and structure. In these lectures we review and discuss the physics underlying the main features of the CMB.
  • The possibility of dark matter being a dissipative component represents an option for the standard view where cold dark matter (CDM) particles behave on large scales as an ideal fluid. By including a physical mechanism to the dark matter description like viscosity we construct a more realistic model for the universe. Also, the known small scale pathologies of the standard CDM model either disappear or become less severe. We study clustering properties of a $\Lambda$CDM-like model in which dark matter is described as a bulk viscous fluid. The linear power spectrum, the nonlinear spherical "top hat" collapse and the mass functions are presented. We use the analysis with such structure formation tools in order to place an upper bound on the magnitude of the dark matter's viscosity.
  • Rastall's theory is a modification of Einstein's theory of gravity where the covariant divergence of the stress-energy tensor is no more vanishing, but proportional to the gradient of the Ricci scalar. The motivation of this theory is to investigate a possible non-minimal coupling of the matter fields to geometry which, being proportional to the curvature scalar, may represent an effective description of quantum gravity effects. Non-conservation of the stress-energy tensor, via Bianchi identities, implies new field equations which have been recently used in a cosmological context, leading to some interesting results. In this paper we adopt Rastall's theory to reproduce some features of the effective Friedmann's equation emerging from loop quantum cosmology. We determine a class of bouncing cosmological solutions and comment about the possibility of employing these models as effective descriptions of the full quantum theory.
  • We present the Dark MaGICC project, which aims to investigate the effect of Dark Energy (DE) modeling on galaxy formation via hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. Dark MaGICC includes four dynamical Dark Energy scenarios with time varying equations of state, one with a self-interacting Ratra-Peebles model. In each scenario we simulate three galaxies with high resolution using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). The baryonic physics model is the same used in the Making Galaxies in a Cosmological Context (MaGICC) project, and we varied only the background cosmology. We find that the Dark Energy parameterization has a surprisingly important impact on galaxy evolution and on structural properties of galaxies at z=0, in striking contrast with predictions from pure Nbody simulations. The different background evolutions can (depending on the behavior of the DE equation of state) either enhance or quench star formation with respect to a LCDM model, at a level similar to the variation of the stellar feedback parameterization, with strong effects on the final galaxy rotation curves. While overall stellar feedback is still the driving force in shaping galaxies, we show that the effect of the Dark Energy parameterization plays a larger role than previously thought, especially at lower redshifts. For this reason, the influence of Dark Energy parametrization on galaxy formation must be taken into account, especially in the era of precision cosmology.
  • Forthcoming experiments will enable us to determine tomographic shear spectra at a high precision level. Most predictions about them have until now been biased on algorithms yielding the expected linear and non-linear spectrum of density fluctuations. Even when simulations have been used, so-called Halofit (Smith et al 2003) predictions on fairly large scales have been needed. We wish to go beyond this limitation. We perform N-body and hydrodynamical simulations within a sufficiently large cosmological volume to allow a direct connection between simulations and linear spectra. While covering large length-scales, the simulation resolution is good enough to allow us to explore the high-l harmonics of the cosmic shear (up to l ~ 50000), well into the domain where baryon physics becomes important. We then compare shear spectra in the absence and in presence of various kinds of baryon physics, such as radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback in the form of galactic winds. We distinguish several typical properties of matter fluctuation spectra in the different simulations and test their impact on shear spectra. We compare our outputs with those obtainable using approximate expressions for non--linear spectra, and identify substantial discrepancies even between our results and those of purely N-body results. Our simulations and the treatment of their outputs however enable us, for the first time, to obtain shear results taht are fully independent of any approximate expression, also in the high-l range, where we need to incorporate a non-linear power spectrum of density perturbations, and the effects of baryon physics. This will allow us to fully exploit the cosmological information contained in future high--sensitivity cosmic shear surveys, exploring the physics of cosmic shears via weak lensing measurements.
  • Forthcoming experiments will enable us to determine high precision tomographic shear spectra. Matter density fluctuation spectra, at various $z$, should then be worked out of them, in order to constrain the model and determine the DE state equation. Available analytical expressions, however, do the opposite, enabling us to derive shear spectra from fluctuation spectra. Here we find the inverse expression, yielding density fluctuation spectra from observational tomographic shear spectra. The procedure involves SVD techniques for matrix inversion. We show in detail how the approach works and provide a few examples.
  • We investigate the impact of non-linear corrections on dark energy parameter estimation from weak lensing probes. We find that using halofit expressions, suited to LCDM models, implies substantial discrepancies with respect to results directly obtained from N-body simulations, when w(z)\neq-1. Discrepancies appear strong when using models with w'(z=0)>0, as fiducial models; they are however significant even in the neighborhood of LCDM, where neglecting the degrees of freedom associated with the DE state equation can lead to a misestimate of the matter density parameter \Omega_m.
  • The next generation mass probes will obtain information on non--linear power spectra P(k,z) and their evolution, allowing us to investigate the nature of Dark Energy. To exploit such data we need high precision simulations, extending at least up to scales of k 10 h/Mpc, where the effects of baryons can no longer be neglected. In this paper, we present a series of large scale hydrodynamical simulations for LCDM and dynamical Dark Energy (dDE) models, in which the equation of state parameter is z-dependent. The simulations include gas cooling, star formation and Supernovae feedback. They closely approximate the observed star formation rate and the observationally derived star/Dark Matter mass ratio in collapsed systems. Baryon dynamics cause spectral shifts exceeding 1% at k > 2-3 h/Mpc compared to pure n-body simulations in the LCDM simulations. This agrees with previous studies, although we find a smaller effect (~50%) on the power spectrum amplitude at higher k's. dDE exhibits similar behavior, even though the dDE simulations produce ~20% less stars than the analogous LCDM cosmologies. Finally, we show that the technique introduced in Casarini et al. to obtain spectra for any $w(z)$ cosmology from constant-w models at any redshift still holds when gas physics is taken into account. While this relieves the need to explore the entire functional space of dark energy state equations, we illustrate a severe risk that future data analysis could lead to misinterpretation of the DE state equation.
  • Spanning the whole functional space of cosmologies with any admissible DE state equations w(a) seems a need, in view of forthcoming observations, namely those aiming to provide a tomography of cosmic shear. In this paper I show that this duty can be eased and that a suitable use of results for constant-w cosmologies can be sufficient. More in detail, I ``assign'' here six cosmologies, aiming to span the space of state equations w(a) = w_o + w_a(1-a), for w_o and w_a values consistent with WMAP5 and WMAP7 releases and run N-body simulations to work out their non-linear fluctuation spectra at various redshifts z. Such spectra are then compared with those of suitable auxiliary models, characterized by constant w. For each z a different auxiliary model is needed. Spectral discrepancies between the assigned and the auxiliary models, up to k ~ 2-3 h Mpc^{-1}, are shown to keep within 1%. Quite in general, discrepancies are smaller at greater z and exhibit a specific trend across the w_o and w_a plane. Besides of aiming at simplifying the evaluation of spectra for a wide range of models, this paper also outlines a specific danger for future studies of the DE state equation, as models fairly distant on the w_0 - w_a plane can be easily confused.
  • WMAP5 and related data have greatly restricted the range of acceptable cosmologies, by providing precise likelihood ellypses on the the w_0-w_a plane. We discuss first how such ellypses can be numerically rebuilt, and present then a map of constant-w models whose spectra, at various redshift, are expected to coincide with acceptable models within ~1%.
  • Accurate predictions on non--linear power spectra, at various redshift z, will be a basic tool to interpret cosmological data from next generation mass probes, so obtaining key information on Dark Energy nature. This calls for high precision simulations, covering the whole functional space of w(z) state equations and taking also into account the admitted ranges of other cosmological parameters; surely a difficult task. A procedure was however suggested, able to match the spectra at z=0, up to k~3, hMpc^{-1}, in cosmologies with an (almost) arbitrary w(z), by making recourse to the results of N-body simulations with w = const. In this paper we extend such procedure to high redshift and test our approach through a series of N-body gravitational simulations of various models, including a model closely fitting WMAP5 and complementary data. Our approach detects w= const. models, whose spectra meet the requirement within 1% at z=0 and perform even better at higher redshift, where they are close to a permil precision. Available Halofit expressions, extended to (constant) w \neq -1 are unfortunately unsuitable to fit the spectra of the physical models considered here. Their extension to cover the desired range should be however feasible, and this will enable us to match spectra from any DE state equation.
  • We compare a large set of cosmologies with WMAP data, performing a fit based on a MCMC algorithm. Besides of LCDM models, we take dynamical DE models, where DE and DM are uncoupled or coupled, both in the case of constant coupling and in the case when coupling varies with suitable laws. DE however arises from a scalar field self-interacting through a SUGRA potential. We find that the best fitting model is SUGRA dynamical DE, almost indipendently from the exponent alpha in the self-interaction potential. The main target of this work are however coupled DE models, for which we find limits on the DE-DM coupling strength. In the case of variable coupling, we also find that greater values of the Hubble constant are preferred.