• The \emph{Undecided-State Dynamics} is a well-known protocol for distributed consensus. We analyze it in the parallel \pull\ communication model on the complete graph for the \emph{binary} case (every node can either support one of \emph{two} possible colors, or be in the undecided state). An interesting open question is whether this dynamics \emph{always} (i.e., starting from an arbitrary initial configuration) reaches consensus \emph{quickly} (i.e., within a polylogarithmic number of rounds) in a complete graph with $n$ nodes. Previous work in this setting only considers initial color configurations with no undecided nodes and a large \emph{bias} (i.e., $\Theta(n)$) towards the majority color. In this paper we present an \textit{unconditional} analysis of the Undecided-State Dynamics that answers to the above question in the affirmative. We prove that, starting from \textit{any} initial configuration, the process reaches a monochromatic configuration within $O(\log n)$ rounds, with high probability. This bound turns out to be tight. Our analysis also shows that, if the initial configuration has bias $\Omega(\sqrt{n\log n})$, then the dynamics converges toward the initial majority color, with high probability.
  • A tree $\sigma$-spanner of a positively real-weighted $n$-vertex and $m$-edge undirected graph $G$ is a spanning tree $T$ of $G$ which approximately preserves (i.e., up to a multiplicative stretch factor $\sigma$) distances in $G$. Tree spanners with provably good stretch factors find applications in communication networks, distributed systems, and network design. However, finding an optimal or even a good tree spanner is a very hard computational task. Thus, if one has to face a transient edge failure in $T$, the overall effort that has to be afforded to rebuild a new tree spanner (i.e., computational costs, set-up of new links, updating of the routing tables, etc.) can be rather prohibitive. To circumvent this drawback, an effective alternative is that of associating with each tree edge a best possible (in terms of resulting stretch) swap edge -- a well-established approach in the literature for several other tree topologies. Correspondingly, the problem of computing all the best swap edges of a tree spanner is a challenging algorithmic problem, since solving it efficiently means to exploit the structure of shortest paths not only in $G$, but also in all the scenarios in which an edge of $T$ has failed. For this problem we provide a very efficient solution, running in $O(n^2 \log^4 n)$ time, which drastically improves (almost by a quadratic factor in $n$ in dense graphs!) on the previous known best result.
  • Computing \emph{all best swap edges} (ABSE) of a spanning tree $T$ of a given $n$-vertex and $m$-edge undirected and weighted graph $G$ means to select, for each edge $e$ of $T$, a corresponding non-tree edge $f$, in such a way that the tree obtained by replacing $e$ with $f$ enjoys some optimality criterion (which is naturally defined according to some objective function originally addressed by $T$). Solving efficiently an ABSE problem is by now a classic algorithmic issue, since it conveys a very successful way of coping with a (transient) \emph{edge failure} in tree-based communication networks: just replace the failing edge with its respective swap edge, so as that the connectivity is promptly reestablished by minimizing the rerouting and set-up costs. In this paper, we solve the ABSE problem for the case in which $T$ is a \emph{single-source shortest-path tree} of $G$, and our two selected swap criteria aim to minimize either the \emph{maximum} or the \emph{average stretch} in the swap tree of all the paths emanating from the source. Having these criteria in mind, the obtained structures can then be reviewed as \emph{edge-fault-tolerant single-source spanners}. For them, we propose two efficient algorithms running in $O(m n +n^2 \log n)$ and $O(m n \log \alpha(m,n))$ time, respectively, and we show that the guaranteed (either maximum or average, respectively) stretch factor is equal to 3, and this is tight. Moreover, for the maximum stretch, we also propose an almost linear $O(m \log \alpha(m,n))$ time algorithm computing a set of \emph{good} swap edges, each of which will guarantee a relative approximation factor on the maximum stretch of $3/2$ (tight) as opposed to that provided by the corresponding BSE. Surprisingly, no previous results were known for these two very natural swap problems.
  • The \emph{rational fair consensus problem} can be informally defined as follows. Consider a network of $n$ (selfish) \emph{rational agents}, each of them initially supporting a \emph{color} chosen from a finite set $ \Sigma$. The goal is to design a protocol that leads the network to a stable monochromatic configuration (i.e. a consensus) such that the probability that the winning color is $c$ is equal to the fraction of the agents that initially support $c$, for any $c \in \Sigma$. Furthermore, this fairness property must be guaranteed (with high probability) even in presence of any fixed \emph{coalition} of rational agents that may deviate from the protocol in order to increase the winning probability of their supported colors. A protocol having this property, in presence of coalitions of size at most $t$, is said to be a \emph{whp\,-$t$-strong equilibrium}. We investigate, for the first time, the rational fair consensus problem in the GOSSIP communication model where, at every round, every agent can actively contact at most one neighbor via a \emph{push$/$pull} operation. We provide a randomized GOSSIP protocol that, starting from any initial color configuration of the complete graph, achieves rational fair consensus within $O(\log n)$ rounds using messages of $O(\log^2n)$ size, w.h.p. More in details, we prove that our protocol is a whp\,-$t$-strong equilibrium for any $t = o(n/\log n)$ and, moreover, it tolerates worst-case permanent faults provided that the number of non-faulty agents is $\Omega(n)$. As far as we know, our protocol is the first solution which avoids any all-to-all communication, thus resulting in $o(n^2)$ message complexity.
  • The resiliency of a network is its ability to remain \emph{effectively} functioning also when any of its nodes or links fails. However, to reduce operational and set-up costs, a network should be small in size, and this conflicts with the requirement of being resilient. In this paper we address this trade-off for the prominent case of the {\em broadcasting} routing scheme, and we build efficient (i.e., sparse and fast) \emph{fault-tolerant approximate shortest-path trees}, for both the edge and vertex \emph{single-failure} case. In particular, for an $n$-vertex non-negatively weighted graph, and for any constant $\varepsilon >0$, we design two structures of size $O(\frac{n \log n}{\varepsilon^2})$ which guarantee $(1+\varepsilon)$-stretched paths from the selected source also in the presence of an edge/vertex failure. This favorably compares with the currently best known solutions, which are for the edge-failure case of size $O(n)$ and stretch factor 3, and for the vertex-failure case of size $O(n \log n)$ and stretch factor 3. Moreover, we also focus on the unweighted case, and we prove that an ordinary $(\alpha,\beta)$-spanner can be slightly augmented in order to build efficient fault-tolerant approximate \emph{breadth-first-search trees}.
  • Let $s$ denote a distinguished source vertex of a non-negatively real weighted and undirected graph $G$ with $n$ vertices and $m$ edges. In this paper we present two efficient \emph{single-source approximate-distance sensitivity oracles}, namely \emph{compact} data structures which are able to \emph{quickly} report an approximate (by a multiplicative stretch factor) distance from $s$ to any node of $G$ following the failure of any edge in $G$. More precisely, we first present a sensitivity oracle of size $O(n)$ which is able to report 2-approximate distances from the source in $O(1)$ time. Then, we further develop our construction by building, for any $0<\epsilon<1$, another sensitivity oracle having size $O\left(n\cdot \frac{1}{\epsilon} \log \frac{1}{\epsilon}\right)$, and which is able to report a $(1+\epsilon)$-approximate distance from $s$ to any vertex of $G$ in $O\left(\log n\cdot \frac{1}{\epsilon} \log \frac{1}{\epsilon}\right)$ time. Thus, this latter oracle is essentially optimal as far as size and stretch are concerned, and it only asks for a logarithmic query time. Finally, our results are complemented with a space lower bound for the related class of single-source \emph{additively-stretched} sensitivity oracles, which is helpful to realize the hardness of designing compact oracles of this type.
  • Network creation games have been extensively studied, both from economists and computer scientists, due to their versatility in modeling individual-based community formation processes, which in turn are the theoretical counterpart of several economics, social, and computational applications on the Internet. In their several variants, these games model the tension of a player between her two antagonistic goals: to be as close as possible to the other players, and to activate a cheapest possible set of links. However, the generally adopted assumption is that players have a \emph{common and complete} information about the ongoing network, which is quite unrealistic in practice. In this paper, we consider a more compelling scenario in which players have only limited information about the network they are embedded in. More precisely, we explore the game-theoretic and computational implications of assuming that players have a complete knowledge of the network structure only up to a given radius $k$, which is one of the most qualified \emph{local-knowledge models} used in distributed computing. To this respect, we define a suitable equilibrium concept, and we provide a comprehensive set of upper and lower bounds to the price of anarchy for the entire range of values of $k$, and for the two classic variants of the game, namely those in which a player's cost --- besides the activation cost of the owned links --- depends on the maximum/sum of all the distances to the other nodes in the network, respectively. These bounds are finally assessed through an extensive set of experiments.
  • Despite its long history, the classical game of peg solitaire continues to attract the attention of the scientific community. In this paper, we consider two problems with an algorithmic flavour which are related with this game, namely Solitaire-Reachability and Solitaire-Army. In the first one, we show that deciding whether there is a sequence of jumps which allows a given initial configuration of pegs to reach a target position is NP-complete. Regarding Solitaire-Army, the aim is to successfully deploy an army of pegs in a given region of the board in order to reach a target position. By solving an auxiliary problem with relaxed constraints, we are able to answer some open questions raised by Cs\'ak\'any and Juh\'asz (Mathematics Magazine, 2000). To appreciate the combinatorial beauty of our solutions, we recommend to visit the gallery of animations provided at http://solitairearmy.isnphard.com.
  • Let $G$ be an $n$-node and $m$-edge positively real-weighted undirected graph. For any given integer $f \ge 1$, we study the problem of designing a sparse \emph{f-edge-fault-tolerant} ($f$-EFT) $\sigma${\em -approximate single-source shortest-path tree} ($\sigma$-ASPT), namely a subgraph of $G$ having as few edges as possible and which, following the failure of a set $F$ of at most $f$ edges in $G$, contains paths from a fixed source that are stretched at most by a factor of $\sigma$. To this respect, we provide an algorithm that efficiently computes an $f$-EFT $(2|F|+1)$-ASPT of size $O(f n)$. Our structure improves on a previous related construction designed for \emph{unweighted} graphs, having the same size but guaranteeing a larger stretch factor of $3(f+1)$, plus an additive term of $(f+1) \log n$. Then, we show how to convert our structure into an efficient $f$-EFT \emph{single-source distance oracle} (SSDO), that can be built in $\widetilde{O}(f m)$ time, has size $O(fn \log^2 n)$, and is able to report, after the failure of the edge set $F$, in $O(|F|^2 \log^2 n)$ time a $(2|F|+1)$-approximate distance from the source to any node, and a corresponding approximate path in the same amount of time plus the path's size. Such an oracle is obtained by handling another fundamental problem, namely that of updating a \emph{minimum spanning forest} (MSF) of $G$ after that a \emph{batch} of $k$ simultaneous edge modifications (i.e., edge insertions, deletions and weight changes) is performed. For this problem, we build in $O(m \log^3 n)$ time a \emph{sensitivity} oracle of size $O(m \log^2 n)$, that reports in $O(k^2 \log^2 n)$ time the (at most $2k$) edges either exiting from or entering into the MSF. [...]
  • Let $G$ be an unweighted $n$-node undirected graph. A \emph{$\beta$-additive spanner} of $G$ is a spanning subgraph $H$ of $G$ such that distances in $H$ are stretched at most by an additive term $\beta$ w.r.t. the corresponding distances in $G$. A natural research goal related with spanners is that of designing \emph{sparse} spanners with \emph{low} stretch. In this paper, we focus on \emph{fault-tolerant} additive spanners, namely additive spanners which are able to preserve their additive stretch even when one edge fails. We are able to improve all known such spanners, in terms of either sparsity or stretch. In particular, we consider the sparsest known spanners with stretch $6$, $28$, and $38$, and reduce the stretch to $4$, $10$, and $14$, respectively (while keeping the same sparsity). Our results are based on two different constructions. On one hand, we show how to augment (by adding a \emph{small} number of edges) a fault-tolerant additive \emph{sourcewise spanner} (that approximately preserves distances only from a given set of source nodes) into one such spanner that preserves all pairwise distances. On the other hand, we show how to augment some known fault-tolerant additive spanners, based on clustering techniques. This way we decrease the additive stretch without any asymptotic increase in their size. We also obtain improved fault-tolerant additive spanners for the case of one vertex failure, and for the case of $f$ edge failures.
  • Let be given a graph $G=(V,E)$ whose edge set is partitioned into a set $R$ of \emph{red} edges and a set $B$ of \emph{blue} edges, and assume that red edges are weighted and form a spanning tree of $G$. Then, the \emph{Stackelberg Minimum Spanning Tree} (\stack) problem is that of pricing (i.e., weighting) the blue edges in such a way that the total weight of the blue edges selected in a minimum spanning tree of the resulting graph is maximized. \stack \ is known to be \apx-hard already when the number of distinct red weights is 2. In this paper we analyze some meaningful specializations and generalizations of \stack, which shed some more light on the computational complexity of the problem. More precisely, we first show that if $G$ is restricted to be \emph{complete}, then the following holds: (i) if there are only 2 distinct red weights, then the problem can be solved optimally (this contrasts with the corresponding \apx-hardness of the general problem); (ii) otherwise, the problem can be approximated within $7/4 + \epsilon$, for any $\epsilon > 0$. Afterwards, we define a natural extension of \stack, namely that in which blue edges have a non-negative \emph{activation cost} associated, and it is given a global \emph{activation budget} that must not be exceeded when pricing blue edges. Here, after showing that the very same approximation ratio as that of the original problem can be achieved, we prove that if the spanning tree of red edges can be rooted so as that any root-leaf path contains at most $h$ edges, then the problem admits a $(2h+\epsilon)$-approximation algorithm, for any $\epsilon > 0$.
  • In this paper we study a generalization of the classic \emph{network creation game} in the scenario in which the $n$ players sit on a given arbitrary \emph{host graph}, which constrains the set of edges a player can activate at a cost of $\alpha \geq 0$ each. This finds its motivations in the physical limitations one can have in constructing links in practice, and it has been studied in the past only when the routing cost component of a player is given by the sum of distances to all the other nodes. Here, we focus on another popular routing cost, namely that which takes into account for each player its \emph{maximum} distance to any other player. For this version of the game, we first analyze some of its computational and dynamic aspects, and then we address the problem of understanding the structure of associated pure Nash equilibria. In this respect, we show that the corresponding price of anarchy (PoA) is fairly bad, even for several basic classes of host graphs. More precisely, we first exhibit a lower bound of $\Omega (\sqrt{ n / (1+\alpha)})$ for any $\alpha = o(n)$. Notice that this implies a counter-intuitive lower bound of $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ for very small values of $\alpha$ (i.e., edges can be activated almost for free). Then, we show that when the host graph is restricted to be either $k$-regular (for any constant $k \geq 3$), or a 2-dimensional grid, the PoA is still $\Omega(1+\min\{\alpha, \frac{n}{\alpha}\})$, which is proven to be tight for $\alpha=\Omega(\sqrt{n})$. On the positive side, if $\alpha \geq n$, we show the PoA is $O(1)$. Finally, in the case in which the host graph is very sparse (i.e., $|E(H)|=n-1+k$, with $k=O(1)$), we prove that the PoA is $O(1)$, for any $\alpha$.
  • The twentieth century has seen the rise of a new type of video games targeted at a mass audience of "casual" gamers. Many of these games require the player to swap items in order to form matches of three and are collectively known as \emph{tile-matching match-three games}. Among these, the most influential one is arguably \emph{Bejeweled} in which the matched items (gems) pop and the above gems fall in their place. Bejeweled has been ported to many different platforms and influenced an incredible number of similar games. Very recently one of them, named \emph{Candy Crush Saga} enjoyed a huge popularity and quickly went viral on social networks. We generalize this kind of games by only parameterizing the size of the board, while all the other elements (such as the rules or the number of gems) remain unchanged. Then, we prove that answering many natural questions regarding such games is actually \NP-Hard. These questions include determining if the player can reach a certain score, play for a certain number of turns, and others. We also \href{http://candycrush.isnphard.com}{provide} a playable web-based implementation of our reduction.
  • A network creation game simulates a decentralized and non-cooperative building of a communication network. Informally, there are $n$ players sitting on the network nodes, which attempt to establish a reciprocal communication by activating, incurring a certain cost, any of their incident links. The goal of each player is to have all the other nodes as close as possible in the resulting network, while buying as few links as possible. According to this intuition, any model of the game must then appropriately address a balance between these two conflicting objectives. Motivated by the fact that a player might have a strong requirement about its centrality in the network, in this paper we introduce a new setting in which if a player maintains its (either maximum or average) distance to the other nodes within a given associated bound, then its cost is simply equal to the number of activated edges, otherwise its cost is unbounded. We study the problem of understanding the structure of associated pure Nash equilibria of the resulting games, that we call MaxBD and SumBD, respectively. For both games, we show that computing the best response of a player is an NP-hard problem. Next, we show that when distance bounds associated with players are non-uniform, then equilibria can be arbitrarily bad. On the other hand, for MaxBD, we show that when nodes have a uniform bound $R$ on the maximum distance, then the Price of Anarchy (PoA) is lower and upper bounded by 2 and $O(n^{\frac{1}{\lfloor\log_3 R\rfloor+1}})$ for $R \geq 3$, while for the interesting case R=2, we are able to prove that the PoA is $\Omega(\sqrt{n})$ and $O(\sqrt{n \log n})$. For the uniform SumBD we obtain similar (asymptotically) results, and moreover we show that the PoA becomes constant as soon as the bound on the average distance is $n^{\omega(\frac{1}{\sqrt{\log n}})}$.