• We combine an analytically solvable mean-field elasto-plastic model with molecular dynamics simulations of a generic glass-former to demonstrate that, depending on their preparation protocol, amorphous materials can yield in two qualitatively distinct ways. We show that well-annealed systems yield in a discontinuous brittle way, as metallic and molecular glasses do. Yielding corresponds in this case to a first-order nonequilibrium phase transition. As the degree of annealing decreases, the first-order character becomes weaker and the transition terminates in a second-order critical point in the universality class of an Ising model in a random field. For even more poorly annealed systems, yielding becomes a smooth crossover, representative of the ductile rheological behavior generically observed in foams, emulsions, and colloidal glasses. Our results show that the variety of yielding behavior found in amorphous materials does not result from the diversity of particle interactions or microscopic dynamics {\it per se}, but is instead unified by carefully considering the role of the initial stability of the system.
  • We numerically study the evolution of the vibrational density of states $D(\omega)$ of zero-temperature glasses when their kinetic stability is varied over an extremely broad range, ranging from poorly annealed glasses obtained by instantaneous quenches from above the onset temperature, to ultrastable glasses obtained by quenching systems thermalised below the experimental glass temperature. The low-frequency part of the density of states splits between extended and quasi-localized modes. Extended modes exhibit a boson peak crossing over to Debye behaviour ($D(\omega) \sim \omega^2$) at low-frequency, with a strong correlation between the two regimes. Quasi-localized modes instead obey $D(\omega) \sim \omega^4$, irrespective of the glass stability. However, the prefactor of this quartic law becomes smaller in more stable glasses, and the corresponding modes become more localized and sparser. Our work is the first numerical observation of quasi-localized modes in a regime relevant to experiments, and it establishes a direct connection between glass stability and soft vibrational motion in amorphous solids.
  • Discontinous shear-thickening in dense suspensions naturally emerges from the activation of frictional forces by shear flow in non-Brownian systems close to jamming. Yet, this physical picture is incomplete as most experiments study soft colloidal particles subject to thermal fluctuations. To characterise discontinuous shear-thickening in colloidal suspensions we use computer simulations to provide a complete description of the competition between athermal jamming, frictional forces, thermal motion, particle softness, and shear flow. We intentionally neglect hydrodynamics, electrostatics, lubrication, and inertia, but can nevertheless achieve quantitative agreement with experimental findings. In particular, shear-thickening corresponds to a crossover between frictionless and frictional jamming regimes which is controlled by thermal fluctuations and particle softness and occurs at a softness dependent P\'eclet number. We also explore the consequences of our findings for constant pressure experiments, and critically discuss the reported emergence of `S-shaped' flow curves. Our work provides the minimal ingredients to quantitatively interpret a large body of experimental work on discontinuous shear-thickening in colloidal suspensions.
  • Computer simulations give precious insight into the microscopic behavior of supercooled liquids and glasses, but their typical time scales are orders of magnitude shorter than the experimentally relevant ones. We recently closed this gap for a class of models of size polydisperse fluids, which we successfully equilibrate beyond laboratory time scales by means of the swap Monte Carlo algorithm. In this contribution, we study the interplay between compositional and geometric local orders in a model of polydisperse hard spheres equilibrated with this algorithm. Local compositional order has a weak state dependence, while local geometric order associated to icosahedral arrangements grows more markedly but only at very high density. We quantify the correlation lengths and the degree of sphericity associated to icosahedral structures and compare these results to those for the Wahnstr\"om Lennard-Jones mixture. Finally, we analyze the structure of very dense samples that partially crystallized following a pattern incompatible with conventional fractionation scenarios. The crystal structure has the symmetry of aluminum diboride and involves a subset of small and large particles with size ratio approximately equal to 0.5.
  • We explore the glassy dynamics of soft colloids using microgels and charged particles interacting by steric and screened Coulomb interactions, respectively. In the supercooled regime, the structural relaxation time $\tau_\alpha$ of both systems grows steeply with volume fraction, reminiscent of the behavior of colloidal hard spheres. Computer simulations confirm that the growth of $\tau_\alpha$ on approaching the glass transition is independent of particle softness. By contrast, softness becomes relevant at very large packing fractions when the system falls out of equilibrium. In this non-equilibrium regime, $\tau_\alpha$ depends surprisingly weakly on packing fraction and time correlation functions exhibit a compressed exponential decay consistent with stress-driven relaxation. The transition to this novel regime coincides with the onset of an anomalous decrease of local order with increasing density typical of ultrasoft systems. We propose that these peculiar dynamics results from the combination of the non-equilibrium aging dynamics expected in the glassy state and the tendency of colloids interacting through soft potentials to refluidize at high packing fractions.
  • We use a swap Monte Carlo algorithm to numerically prepare bulk glasses with kinetic stability comparable to that of glass films produced experimentally by physical vapor deposition. By melting these systems into the liquid state, we show that some of our glasses retain their amorphous structures longer than 10^5 times the equilibrium structural relaxation time. This exceptional kinetic stability cannot be achieved experimentally for bulk materials. We perform simulations at both constant volume and constant pressure to demonstrate that the density mismatch between the ultrastable glass and the equilibrium liquid accounts for a major part of the observed kinetic stability.
  • We numerically study the jamming transition of frictionless polydisperse spheres in three dimensions. We use an efficient thermalisation algorithm for the equilibrium hard sphere fluid and generate amorphous jammed packings over a range of critical jamming densities that is about three times broader than in previous studies. This allows us to reexamine a wide range of structural properties characterizing the jamming transition. Both isostaticity and the critical behavior of the pair correlation function hold over the entire range of jamming densities. At intermediate length scales, we find a weak, smooth increase of bond orientational order. By contrast, distorted icosahedral structures grow rapidly with increasing the volume fraction in both fluid and jammed states. Surprisingly, at large scale we observe that denser jammed states show stronger deviations from hyperuniformity, suggesting that the enhanced amorphous ordering inherited from the equilibrium fluid competes with, rather than enhances, hyperuniformity. Finally, finite size fluctuations of the critical jamming density are considerably suppressed in the denser jammed states, indicating an important change in the topography of the potential energy landscape. By considerably stretching the amplitude of the critical "J-line", our work disentangles physical properties at the contact scale that are associated with jamming criticality, from those occurring at larger length scales, which have a different nature.
  • Dense assemblies of self-propelled particles undergo a nonequilibrium form of glassy dynamics. Physical intuition suggests that increasing departure from equilibrium due to active forces fluidifies a glassy system. We falsify this belief by devising a model of self-propelled particles where increasing departure from equilibrium can both enhance or depress glassy dynamics, depending on the chosen state point. We analyze a number of static and dynamic observables and suggest that the location of the nonequilibrium glass transition is primarily controlled by the evolution of two-point static density correlations due to active forces. The dependence of the density correlations on the active forces varies non-trivially with the details of the system, and is difficult to predict theoretically. Our results emphasize the need to develop an accurate liquid state theory for nonequilibrium systems.
  • Marginally stable solids have peculiar physical properties that were discovered and analyzed in the context of the jamming transition. We theoretically investigate the existence of marginal stability in a prototypical model for structural glass-formers, combining analytical calculations in infinite dimensions to computer simulations in three dimensions. While mean-field theory predicts the existence of a Gardner phase transition towards a marginally stable glass phase at low temperatures, simulations show no hint of diverging timescales or lengthscales, but reveal instead the presence of sparse localized defects. Our results suggest that the Gardner transition is deeply affected by finite dimensional fluctuations, and raise issues about the relevance of marginal stability in structural glasses far away from jamming.
  • We present a comprehensive review of the physical behavior of yield stress materials in soft condensed matter, which encompass a broad range of materials from colloidal assemblies and gels to emulsions and non-Brownian suspensions. All these disordered materials display a nonlinear flow behavior in response to external mechanical forces, due to the existence of a finite force threshold for flow to occur: the yield stress. We discuss both the physical origin and rheological consequences associated with this nonlinear behavior, and give an overview of experimental techniques available to measure the yield stress. We discuss recent progress concerning a microscopic theoretical description of the flow dynamics of yield stress materials, emphasizing in particular the role played by relaxation time scales, the interplay between shear flow and aging behavior, the existence of inhomogeneous shear flows and shear bands, wall slip, and non-local effects in confined geometries.
  • Glass films created by vapor-depositing molecules onto a substrate can exhibit properties similar to those of ordinary glasses aged for thousands of years. It is believed that enhanced surface mobility is the mechanism that allows vapor deposition to create such exceptional glasses, but it is unclear how this effect is related to the final state of the film. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to model vapor deposition and an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm to determine the deposition rate needed to create equilibrium glassy films. We obtain a scaling relation that quantitatively captures the efficiency gain of vapor deposition over bulk annealing, and demonstrates that surface relaxation plays the same role in the formation of vapor-deposited glasses as bulk relaxation in ordinary glass formation.
  • We numerically analyse the density field of three-dimensional randomly jammed packings of monodisperse soft frictionles spherical particles, paying special attention to fluctuations occurring at large lengthscales. We study in detail the two-point static structure factor at low wavevectors in Fourier space. We also analyse the nature of the density field in real space by studying the large-distance behavior of the two-point pair correlation function, of density fluctuations in subsystems of increasing sizes, and of the direct correlation function. We show that such real space analysis can be greatly improved by introducing a coarse-grained density field to disentangle genuine large-scale correlations from purely local effects. Our results confirm that both Fourier and real space signatures of vanishing density fluctuations at large scale are absent, indicating that randomly jammed packings are not hyperuniform. In addition, we establish that the pair correlation function displays a surprisingly complex structure at large distances, which is however not compatible with the long-range negative correlation of hyperuniform systems but fully compatible with an analytic form for the structure factor. This implies that the direct correlation function is short-ranged, as we also demonstrate directly. Our results reveal that density fluctuations in jammed packings do not follow the behavior expected for random hyperuniform materials, but display instead a more complex behavior.
  • Successful computer studies of glass-forming materials need to overcome both the natural tendency to structural ordering and the dramatic increase of relaxation times at low temperatures. We present a comprehensive analysis of eleven glass-forming models to demonstrate that both challenges can be efficiently tackled using carefully designed models of size polydisperse supercooled liquids together with an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm where translational particle displacements are complemented by swaps of particle pairs. We study a broad range of size polydispersities, using both discrete and continuous mixtures, and we systematically investigate the role of particle softness, attractivity and non-additivity of the interactions. Each system is characterized by its robustness against structural ordering and by the efficiency of the swap Monte Carlo algorithm. We show that the combined optimisation of the potential's softness, polydispersity and non-additivity leads to novel computer models with excellent glass-forming ability. For such models, we achieve over ten orders of magnitude gain in the equilibration timescale using the swap Monte Carlo algorithm, thus paving the way to computational studies of static and thermodynamic properties under experimental conditions. In addition, we provide microscopic insights into the performance of the swap algorithm which should help optimizing models and algorithms even further.
  • Liquids relax extremely slowly on approaching the glass state. One explanation is that an entropy crisis, due to the rarefaction of available states, makes it increasingly arduous to reach equilibrium in that regime. Validating this scenario is challenging, because experiments offer limited resolution, while numerical studies lag more than eight orders of magnitude behind experimentally-relevant timescales. In this work we not only close the colossal gap between experiments and simulations but manage to create in-silico configurations that have no experimental analog yet. Deploying a range of computational tools, we obtain four estimates of their configurational entropy. These measurements consistently confirm that the steep entropy decrease observed in experiments is found also in simulations even beyond the experimental glass transition. Our numerical results thus open a new observational window into the physics of glasses and reinforce the relevance of an entropy crisis for understanding their formation.
  • Classical particle systems characterized by continuous size polydispersity, such as colloidal materials, are not straightforwardly described using statistical mechanics, since fundamental issues may arise from particle distinguishability. Because the mixing entropy in such systems is divergent in the thermodynamic limit we show that the configurational entropy estimated from standard computational approaches to characterize glassy states also diverges. This reasoning would suggest that polydisperse materials cannot undergo a glass transition, in contradiction to experiments. We explain that this argument stems from the confusion between configurations in phase space and states defined by free energy minima, and propose a simple method to compute a finite and physically meaningful configurational entropy in continuously polydisperse systems. Physically, the proposed approach relies on an effective description of the system as an $M^*$-component system with a finite $M^*$, for which finite mixing and configurational entropies are obtained. We show how to directly determine $M^*$ from computer simulations in a range of glass-forming models with different size polydispersities, characterized by hard and soft interparticle interactions, and by additive and non-additive interactions. Our approach provides consistent results in all cases and demonstrates that the configurational entropy of polydisperse system exists, is finite, and can be quantitatively estimated.
  • The growing sluggishness of glass-forming liquids is thought to be accompanied by growing structural order. The nature of such order, however, remains hotly debated. A decade ago, point-to-set (PTS) correlation lengths were proposed as measures of amorphous order in glass formers, but recent results raise doubts as to their generality. Here, we extend the definition of PTS correlations to agnostically capture any type of growing order in liquids, be it local or amorphous. This advance enables the formulation of a clear distinction between slowing down due to conventional critical ordering and that due to glassiness, and provides a unified framework to assess the relative importance of specific local order and generic amorphous order in glass formation.
  • We use computer simulations to analyse the yielding transition during large-amplitude oscillatory shear of a simple model for soft jammed solids. Simultaneous analysis of global mechanical response and particle-scale motion demonstrates that macroscopic yielding, revealed by a smooth crossover in mechanical properties, is accompanied by a sudden change in the particle dynamics, which evolves from non-diffusive motion to irreversible diffusion as the amplitude of the shear is increased. We provide numerical evidence that this sharp change corresponds to a non-equilibrium first-order dynamic phase transition, thus establishing the existence of a well-defined microscopic dynamic signature of the yielding transition in amorphous materials in oscillatory shear.
  • Tracking experiments in dense biological tissues reveal a diversity of sources f or local energy injection at the cell scale. The effect of cell motility has been largely studied, but much less is known abo ut the effect of the observed volume fluctuations of individual cells. We devise a simple microscopic model of `actively-deforming' particles where local fluctuations of the particle size constitute a unique source of motion. We demonstrate that collective motion can emerge under the sole influence of such active volume fluctuations. We interpret the onset of diffusive motion as a nonequilibrium first-order phase transition, which arises at a well-defined amplitude of self-deformation. This behaviour contrasts with the glassy dynamics produced by self-propulsion, but resembles the mechanical response of soft solids under mechanical deformation. It thus constitutes the first example of active yielding transition.
  • We study the glassy dynamics taking place in dense assemblies of athermal active particles that are driven solely by a nonequilibrium self-propulsion mechanism. Active forces are modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck stochastic process, characterized by a persistence time and an effective temperature, and particles interact via a Lennard-Jones potential that yields well-studied glassy behavior in the Brownian limit, obtained as the persistence time vanishes. By increasing the persistence time, the system departs more strongly from thermal equilibrium and we provide a comprehensive numerical analysis of the structure and dynamics of the resulting active fluid. Finite persistence times profoundly affect the static structure of the fluid and give rise to nonequilibrium velocity correlations that are absent in thermal systems. Despite these nonequilibrium features, for any value of the persistence time we observe a nonequilibrium glass transition as the effective temperature is decreased. Surprisingly, increasing departure from thermal equilibrium is found to promote (rather than suppress) the glassy dynamics. Overall, our results suggest that with increasing persistence time, microscopic properties of the active fluid change quantitatively, but the broad features of the nonequilibrium glassy dynamics observed with decreasing the effective temperature remain qualitatively similar to those of thermal glass-formers.
  • We use large-scale computer simulations to explore the non-equilibrium aging dynamics in a microscopic model for colloidal gels. We find that gelation resulting from a kinetically-arrested phase separation is accompanied by `anomalous' particle dynamics revealed by superdiffusive particle motion and compressed exponential relaxation of time correlation functions. Spatio-temporal analysis of the dynamics reveals intermittent heterogeneities producing spatial correlations over extremely large length scales. Our study is the first microscopically-resolved model reproducing all features of the spontaneous aging dynamics observed experimentally in soft materials.
  • We implement and optimize a particle-swap Monte-Carlo algorithm that allows us to thermalize a polydisperse system of hard spheres up to unprecedentedly-large volume fractions, where \revise{previous} algorithms and experiments fail to equilibrate. We show that no glass singularity intervenes before the jamming density, which we independently determine through two distinct non-equilibrium protocols. We demonstrate that equilibrium fluid and non-equilibrium jammed states can have the same density, showing that the jamming transition cannot be the end-point of the fluid branch.
  • Low-temperature properties of crystalline solids can be understood using harmonic perturbations around a perfect lattice, as in Debye's theory. Low-temperature properties of amorphous solids, however, strongly depart from such descriptions, displaying enhanced transport, activated slow dynamics across energy barriers, excess vibrational modes with respect to Debye's theory (i.e., a Boson Peak), and complex irreversible responses to small mechanical deformations. These experimental observations indirectly suggest that the dynamics of amorphous solids becomes anomalous at low temperatures. Here, we present direct numerical evidence that vibrations change nature at a well-defined location deep inside the glass phase of a simple glass former. We provide a real-space description of this transition and of the rapidly growing time and length scales that accompany it. Our results provide the seed for a universal understanding of low-temperature glass anomalies within the theoretical framework of the recently discovered Gardner phase transition.
  • We discuss the microscopic mechanisms by which low-temperature amorphous states, such as ultrastable glasses, transform into equilibrium fluids, after a sudden temperature increase. Experiments suggest that this process is similar to the melting of crystals, thus differing from the behaviour found in ordinary glasses. We rationalize these observations using the physical idea that the transformation process takes place very close to a `hidden' equilibrium first-order phase transition, which is observed in systems of coupled replicas. We illustrate our views using simulation results for a simple two-dimensional plaquette spin model, which is known to exhibit a range of glassy behaviour. Our results suggest that nucleation-and-growth dynamics, as found near ordinary first-order transitions, is also the correct theoretical framework to analyse the melting of ultrastable glasses. Our approach provides a unified understanding of multiple experimental observations, such as propagating melting fronts, large kinetic stability ratios, and `giant' dynamic lengthscales.
  • One possible framework to interpret the irreversibility transition observed in periodically driven colloidal suspensions is that of a non-equilibrium phase transition towards an absorbing reversible state at low amplitude of the driving force. We consider a simple numerical model for driven suspensions which allows us to characterize in great detail a large body of physical observables that can be experimentally determined to assess the existence and universality class of such a non-equilibrium phase transition. Characterizing the behaviour of static and dynamic correlation functions both in real and Fourier space we determine in particular several critical exponents for our model, which take values that are in good agreement with the universality class of direct ed percolation. We also provide a detailed analysis of single-particle and collective dynamics of the system near the phase transition, which appear intermittent and spatially correlated over diverging timescales and lengthscales, and provide clear signatures of the underlying criticality.
  • Cavity point-to-set correlations are real-space tools to detect the roughening of the free-energy landscape that accompanies the dynamical slowdown of glass-forming liquids. Measuring these correlations in model glass formers remains, however, a major computational challenge. Here, we develop a general parallel-tempering method that provides orders-of-magnitude improvement for sampling and equilibrating configurations within cavities. We apply this improved scheme to the canonical Kob-Andersen binary Lennard-Jones model for temperatures down to the mode-coupling theory crossover. Most significant improvements are noted for small cavities, which have thus far been the most difficult to study. This methodological advance also enables us to study a broader range of physical observables associated with thermodynamic fluctuations. We measure the probability distribution of overlap fluctuations in cavities, which displays a non-trivial temperature evolution. The corresponding overlap susceptibility is found to provide a robust quantitative estimate of the point-to-set length scale requiring no fitting. By resolving spatial fluctuations of the overlap in the cavity, we also obtain quantitative information about the geometry of overlap fluctuations. We can thus examine in detail how the penetration length as well as its fluctuations evolve with temperature and cavity size.