• Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2020 within the Cosmic Vision 2015 2025 program. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • Euclid is a European Space Agency medium class mission selected for launch in 2019 within the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 programme. The main goal of Euclid is to understand the origin of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Euclid will explore the expansion history of the Universe and the evolution of cosmic structures by measuring shapes and redshifts of galaxies as well as the distribution of clusters of galaxies over a large fraction of the sky. Although the main driver for Euclid is the nature of dark energy, Euclid science covers a vast range of topics, from cosmology to galaxy evolution to planetary research. In this review we focus on cosmology and fundamental physics, with a strong emphasis on science beyond the current standard models. We discuss five broad topics: dark energy and modified gravity, dark matter, initial conditions, basic assumptions and questions of methodology in the data analysis. This review has been planned and carried out within Euclid's Theory Working Group and is meant to provide a guide to the scientific themes that will underlie the activity of the group during the preparation of the Euclid mission.
  • We study a dark energy model with non-zero anisotropic stress, either linked to the dark energy density or to the dark matter density. We compute approximate solutions that allow to characterise the behaviour of the dark energy model and to assess the stability of the perturbations. We also determine the current limits on such an anisotropic stress from the cosmic microwave background data by the Planck satellite, and derive the corresponding constraints on the modified growth parameters like the growth index, the effective Newton's constant and the gravitational slip.
  • The origin of large-scale magnetic fields in cosmic structures and the intergalactic medium is still poorly understood. We explore the effects of non-minimal couplings of electromagnetism on the cosmological evolution of currents and magnetic fields. In this context, we revisit the mildly non-linear plasma dynamics around recombination that are known to generate weak magnetic fields. We use the covariant approach to obtain a fully general and non-linear evolution equation for the plasma currents and derive a generalised Ohm law valid on large scales as well as in the presence of non-minimal couplings to cosmological (pseudo-)scalar fields. Due to the sizeable conductivity of the plasma and the stringent observational bounds on such couplings, we conclude that modifications of the standard (adiabatic) evolution of magnetic fields are severely limited in these scenarios. Even at scales well beyond a Mpc, any departure from flux freezing behaviour is inhibited.
  • We propose a fully nonlinear framework to construct consistency relations for testing generic cosmological scenarios using the evolution of large scale structure. It is based on the covariant approach in combination with a frame that is purely given by the metric, the normal frame. As an example, we apply this framework to the LambdaCDM model, by extending the usual first order conditions on the metric potentials to second order, where the two potentials start to differ from each other. We argue that working in the normal frame is not only a practical choice but also helps with the physical interpretation of nonlinear dynamics. In this frame, effective pressures and anisotropic stresses appear at second order in perturbation theory, even for "pressureless" dust. We quantify their effect and compare them, for illustration, to the pressure of a generic clustering dark energy uid and the anisotropic stress in the DGP model. Besides, we also discuss the effect of a mismatch of the potentials on the determination of galaxy bias.
  • We re-examine the classic problem of the renormalization of zero-point quantum fluctuations in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background. We discuss a number of issues that arise when regularizing the theory with a momentum-space cutoff, and show explicitly how introducing non-covariant counter-terms allows to obtain covariant results for the renormalized vacuum energy-momentum tensor. We clarify some confusion in the literature concerning the equation of state of vacuum fluctuations. Further, we point out that the general structure of the effective action becomes richer if the theory contains a scalar field phi with mass m smaller than the Hubble parameter H(t). Such an ultra-light particle cannot be integrated out completely to get the effective action. Apart from the volume term and the Einstein-Hilbert term, that are reabsorbed into renormalizations of the cosmological constant and Newton's constant, the effective action in general also has a term proportional to F(phi)R, for some function F(phi). As a result, vacuum fluctuations of ultra-light scalar fields naturally lead to models where the dark energy density has the form rho_{DE}(t)=rho_X(t)+rho_Z(t), where rho_X is the component that accelerates the Hubble expansion at late times and rho_Z(t) is an extra contribution proportional to H^2(t). We perform a detailed comparison of such models with CMB, SNIa and BAO data.
  • The generation of helical magnetic fields during single field inflation due to an axial coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton is discussed. We find that such a coupling always leads to a blue spectrum of magnetic fields during slow roll inflation. Though the helical magnetic fields further evolve during the inverse cascade in the radiation era after inflation, we conclude that the magnetic fields generated by such an axial coupling can not lead to observed field strength on cosmologically relevant scales.
  • We propose a novel scenario to generate primordial magnetic fields during inflation induced by an oscillating coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. This resonant mechanism has two key advantages over previous proposals. First of all, it generates a narrow band of magnetic fields at any required wavelength, thereby allaying the usual problem of a strongly blue spectrum and its associated backreaction. Secondly, it avoids the need for a strong coupling as the coupling is oscillating rather than growing or decaying exponentially. Despite these major advantages, we find that the backreaction is still far too large during inflation if the generated magnetic fields are required to have a strength of order 10^{-15} Gauss today on observationally interesting scales. We provide a more general no-go argument, proving that this problem will apply to any model in which the magnetic fields are generated on subhorizon scales and freeze after horizon crossing.
  • We examine a cosmological model with a dark energy density of the form $\rho_{DE}(t)=\rho_X(t)+\rho_Z(t)$, where $\rho_X$ is the component that accelerates the Hubble expansion at late times and $\rho_Z(t)$ is an extra contribution proportional to $H^2(t)$. This form of $\rho_Z(t)$ follows from the recent proposal that the contribution of zero-point fluctuations of quantum fields to the total energy density should be computed by subtracting the Minkowski-space result from that computed in the FRW space-time. We discuss theoretical arguments that support this subtraction. By definition, this eliminates the quartic divergence in the vacuum energy density responsible for the cosmological constant problem. We show that the remaining quadratic divergence can be reabsorbed into a redefinition of Newton's constant only under the assumption that the energy-momentum tensor of vacuum fluctuations is conserved in isolation. However, in the presence of an ultra-light scalar field $X$ with $m_X<H_0$, as typical of some dark energy models, the gravity effective action depends both on the gravitational field and on the $X$ field. In this case general covariance only requires the conservation of the total energy-momentum tensor, including both the classical term $T^X_{\mu\nu}$ and the vacuum expectation value of T_{\mu\nu}. If there is an exchange of energy between these two terms, there are potentially observable consequences. We construct an explicit model with an interaction between $\rho_X$ and $\rho_Z$ and we show that the total dark energy density $\rho_{DE}(t)=\rho_X(t)+\rho_Z(t)$ always remains a finite fraction of the critical density at any time, providing a specific model of early dark energy. We discuss the implication of this result for the coincidence problem and we estimate the model parameters by means of a full likelihood analysis using current CMB, SNe Ia and BAO data.
  • We study the generation of helical magnetic fields during single field inflation induced by an axial coupling of the electromagnetic field to the inflaton. During slow roll inflation, we find that such a coupling always leads to a blue spectrum with $B^2(k) \propto k$, as long as the theory is treated perturbatively. The magnetic energy density at the end of inflation is found to be typically too small to backreact on the background dynamics of the inflaton. We also show that a short deviation from slow roll does not result in strong modifications to the shape of the spectrum. We calculate the evolution of the correlation length and the field amplitude during the inverse cascade and viscous damping of the helical magnetic field in the radiation era after inflation. We conclude that except for low scale inflation with very strong coupling, the magnetic fields generated by such an axial coupling in single field slow roll inflation with perturbative coupling to the inflaton are too weak to provide the seeds for the observed fields in galaxies and clusters.
  • We present a brief overview of the stability analysis of the Einstein static universe in various modified theories of gravity, like f(R) gravity, Gauss-Bonnet or f(G) gravity, and Horava-Lifshitz gravity.
  • Next generation surveys will observe the large-scale structure of the Universe with unprecedented accuracy. This will enable us to test the relationships between matter over-densities, the curvature perturbation and the Newtonian potential. Any large-distance modification of gravity or exotic nature of dark energy modifies these relationships as compared to those predicted in the standard smooth dark energy model based on General Relativity. In linear theory of structure growth such modifications are often parameterised by virtue of two functions of space and time that enter the relation of the curvature perturbation to, first, the matter over-density, and second, the Newtonian potential. We investigate the predictions for these functions in Brans-Dicke theory, clustering dark energy models and interacting dark energy models. We find that each theory has a distinct path in the parameter space of modified growth. Understanding these theoretical priors on the parameterisations of modified growth is essential to reveal the nature of cosmic acceleration with the help of upcoming observations of structure formations.
  • Dark energy can be studied by its influence on the expansion of the Universe as well as on the growth history of the large-scale structure. In this paper, we follow the growth of the cosmic density field in early dark energy cosmologies by combining observations of the primary CMB temperature and polarisation power spectra at high redshift, of the CMB lensing deflection field at intermediate redshift and of weak cosmic shear at low redshifts for constraining the allowed amount of early dark energy. We present these forecasts using the Fisher-matrix formalism and consider the combination of Planck-data with the weak lensing survey of Euclid. We find that combining these data sets gives powerful constraints on early dark energy and is able to break degeneracies in the parameter set inherent to the various observational channels. The derived statistical 1-sigma-bound on the early dark energy density parameter is sigma(Omega_d^e)=0.0022 which suggests that early dark energy models can be well examined in our approach. In addition, we derive the dark energy figure of merit for the considered dark energy parameterisation and comment on the applicability of the growth index to early dark energy cosmologies.
  • In this work, exact solutions of static and spherically symmetric space-times are analyzed in f(R) modified theories of gravity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics. Firstly, we restrict the metric fields to one degree of freedom, considering the specific case of g_tt\g_rr = -1. Using the dual P formalism of nonlinear electrodynamics an exact general solution is deduced in terms of the structural function H_P. In particular, specific exact solutions to the gravitational field equations are found, confirming previous results and new pure electric field solutions are found. Secondly, motivated by the existence of regular electric fields at the center, and allowing for the case of g_tt\g_rr \= -1, new specific solutions are found. Finally, we outline alternative approaches by considering the specific case of constant curvature, followed by the analysis of a specific form for f(R).
  • We analyse the possibility that topological defects can act as a source of magnetic fields through the Harrison mechanism in the radiation era. We give a detailed relativistic derivation of the Harrison mechanism at first order in cosmological perturbations, and show that it is only efficient for temperatures above T ~ 0.2 keV. Our main result is that the vector metric perturbations generated by the defects cannot induce vorticity in the matter fluids at linear order, thereby excluding the production of currents and magnetic fields. We show that anisotropic stress in the matter fluids is required to source vorticity and magnetic fields. Our analysis is relevant for any mechanism whereby vorticity is meant to be transferred purely by gravitational interactions, and thus would also apply to dark matter or neutrinos.
  • We analyze the stability of the Einstein static universe by considering homogeneous scalar perturbations in the context of f(R) modified theories of gravity. By considering specific forms of f(R), the stability regions of the solutions are parameterized by a linear equation of state parameter w=p/rho. Contrary to classical general relativity, it is found that in f(R) gravity a stable Einstein cosmos with a positive cosmological constant does indeed exist. Thus, we are lead to conclude that, in principle, modifications in f(R) gravity stabilize solutions which are unstable in general relativity.
  • We present an analytical and numerical study of the velocity distribution function of self gravitating collisionless particles, which include dark matter and star clusters. We show that the velocity distribution derived through the Eddington's formula is identical to the analytical one derived directly from the generalized entropy of non-extensive statistical mechanics. This implies that self gravitating collisionless structures are to be described by non-extensive thermo-statistics. We identify a connection between the density slope of dark matter structures, \gamma, from \rho ~ r^{-\gamma}, and the entropic index, q, from the generalized entropy, S_q. Our numerical result confirms the analytical findings of earlier studies and clarifies which is the correct connection between the density slope and the entropic index. We use this result to conclude that from a fundamental statistical mechanics point of view the central density slope of self gravitating collisionless dark matter structures is not constrained, and even cored dark matter structures are allowed with \gamma = 0. We find that the outer density slope is bounded by \gamma= 10/3.