• We report the results of a pilot study of CO$(4-3)$ emission line of three {\it WISE}-selected hyper-luminous, dust-obscured quasars (QSOs) with sensitive ALMA Band 3 observations. These obscured QSOs with $L_{\rm bol}>10^{14}L_\odot$ are among the most luminous objects in the universe. All three QSO hosts are clearly detected both in continuum and in CO$(4-3)$ emission line. Based on CO$(4-3)$ emission line detection, we derive the molecular gas masses ($\sim 10^{10-11}$ M$_\odot$), suggesting that these QSOs are gas-rich systems. We find that three obscured QSOs in our sample follow the similar $L'_{\rm CO}- L_{\rm FIR}$ relation as unobscured QSOs at high redshifts. We also find the complex velocity structures of CO$(4-3)$ emission line, which provide the possible evidence for gas-rich merger in W0149+2350 and possible molecular outflow in W0220+0137 and W0410$-$0913. Massive molecular outflow can blow away the obscured interstellar medium (ISM) and make obscured QSOs evolve towards the UV/optical bright, unobscured phase. Our result is consistent with the popular AGN feedback scenario involving the co-evolution between the SMBH and host galaxy.
  • Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a new population recently discovered in the \wise All-Sky survey. Multiwavelength follow-up observations suggest that they are luminous, dust-obscured quasars at high redshift. Here we present the JCMT SCUBA-2 850 $\mu m$ follow-up observations of 10 Hot DOGs. Four out of ten Hot DOGs have been detected at $>3\sigma$ level. Based on the IR SED decomposition approach, we derive the IR luminosities of AGN torus and cold dust components. Hot DOGs in our sample are extremely luminous with most of them having $L_{\rm IR}^{\rm tot}>10^{14} L_\odot$. The torus emissions dominate the total IR energy output. However, the cold dust contribution is still non-negligible, with the fraction of the cold dust contribution to the total IR luminosity $(\sim 8-24\%)$ being dependent on the choice of torus model. The derived cold dust temperatures in Hot DOGs are comparable to those in UV bright quasars with similar IR luminosity, but much higher than those in SMGs. Higher dust temperatures in Hot DOGs may be due to the more intense radiation field caused by intense starburst and obscured AGN activities. Fourteen and five submillimeter serendipitous sources in the 10 SCUBA-2 fields around Hot DOGs have been detected at $>3\sigma$ and $>3.5\sigma$ levels, respectively. By estimating their cumulative number counts, we confirm the previous argument that Hot DOGs lie in dense environments. Our results support the scenario in which Hot DOGs are luminous, dust-obscured quasars lying in dense environments, and being in the transition phase between extreme starburst and UV-bright quasars.
  • It is unclear whether bulge growth is responsible for the flattening of the star formation main sequence (MS) at the high mass end. To investigate the role of bulges in shaping the MS, we compare the NUV$-r$ color between the central ($r<R_{50}$) and outer regions for a sample of 6401 local star-forming galaxies. The NUV$-r$ color is a good specific star formation rate indicator. We find that at $M_{\ast}<10^{10.2}M_{\sun}$, the central NUV$-r$ is on average only $\sim$ 0.25 mag redder than the outer NUV$-r$. Above $M_{\ast}=10^{10.2}M_{\sun}$, the central NUV$-r$ becomes systematically much redder than the outer NUV$-r$ for more massive galaxies, indicating that the central bulge is more evolved at the massive end. When dividing the galaxies according to their S\'ersic index $n$, we find that galaxies with $n$>2.0 tend to be redder in the central NUV$-r$ color than those with $n$<2.0, even at fixed B/T and $M_{\ast}$. This suggests that star formation in bulges is more strongly dependent on $n$ (or central mass density) than on B/T. Finally, we find that the fraction of galaxies with $n$>2.0 rapidly increases with $M_{\ast}$ at $M_{\ast}>10^{10.2}M_{\sun}$, which is consistent with the turning over of the MS at the same transition mass. We conclude that the increasing fraction of low-sSFR dense bulges in $M_{\ast}>10^{10.2}M_{\sun}$ galaxies, rather than increasing B/T, is responsible for the flattened slope of the $M_{\ast}$$-$SFR relation at high masses.
  • Previous studies have shown that WISE-selected hyperluminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are powered by highly dust-obscured, possibly Compton-thick AGNs. High obscuration provides us a good chance to study the host morphology of the most luminous AGNs directly. We analyze the host morphology of 18 Hot DOGs at $z\sim3$ using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging. We find that Hot DOGs have a high merger fraction ($62\pm 14 \%$). By fitting the surface brightness profiles, we find that the distribution of S\'ersic indices in our Hot DOG sample peaks around 2, which suggests that most of Hot DOGs have transforming morphologies. We also derive the AGN bolometric luminosity ($\sim10^{14}L_\odot$) of our Hot DOG sample by using IR SEDs decomposition. The derived merger fraction and AGN bolometric luminosity relation is well consistent with the variability-based model prediction (Hickox et al. 2014). Both the high merger fraction in IR-luminous AGN sample and relatively low merger fraction in UV/optical-selected, unobscured AGN sample can be expected in the merger-driven evolutionary model. Finally, we conclude that Hot DOGs are merger-driven and may represent a transit phase during the evolution of massive galaxies, transforming from the dusty starburst dominated phase to the unobscured QSO phase.
  • We utilize a Bayesian approach to fit the observed mid-IR-to-submm/mm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 22 WISE-selected and submm-detected, hyperluminous hot dust-obscured galaxies. By adopting the Torus+GB model, we decompose the observed IR SEDs of Hot DOGs into torus and cold dust components. The main results are: 1) Hot DOGs in our submm-detected sample are hyperluminous, with torus emission dominating the IR energy output. However, cold dust emission is non-negligible, averagely contributing ~24% of total IR luminosity. 2) Compared to QSO and starburst SED templates, the median SED of Hot DOGs shows the highest luminosity ratio between mid-IR and submm at rest-frame, while it is very similar to that of QSOs at 10-50um suggesting that the heating sources of Hot DOGs should be buried AGNs. 3) Hot DOGs have both high dust temperatures ~73K and IR luminosity of cold dust. The T-L relation of Hot DOGs suggests that the increase in IR luminosity for Hot DOGs is mostly due to the increase of the dust temperature, rather than dust mass. Hot DOGs have lower dust masses than those of submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) and QSOs within the similar redshift range. Both high IR luminosity of cold dust and relatively low dust mass in Hot DOGs can be expected by their relatively high dust temperatures. 4) Hot DOGs have high dust covering factors, which deviate the previously proposed trend of the dust covering factor decreasing with increasing bolometric luminosity. Finally, we can reproduce the observed properties in Hot DOGs by employing a physical model of galaxy evolution. The result suggests that Hot DOGs may lie at or close to peaks of both star formation and black hole growth histories, and represent a transit phase during the evolution of massive galaxies, transforming from the dusty starburst dominated phase to the optically bright QSO phase. (abridged)
  • Using a sample of ~6,000 local face-on star-forming galaxies (SFGs), we examine the correlations between the NUV-r colors both inside and outside the half-light radius, stellar mass M* and S\'{e}rsic index n in order to understand how the quenching of star formation is linked to galaxy structure. For these less dust-attenuated galaxies, NUV-r is found to be linearly correlated with Dn4000, supporting that NUV-r is a good photometric indicator of stellar age (or specific star formation rate). We find that: (1) At M*<10^{10.2}M_{\sun}, the central NUV-r is on average only~ 0.25 mag redder than the outer NUV-r. The intrinsic value would be even smaller after accounting for dust correction. However, the central NUV-r becomes systematically much redder than the outer NUV-r for more massive galaxies at M*>10^{10.2}M_{\sun}. (2) The central NUV-r shows no dependence on S\'{e}rsic index n at M*<10^{10.2}M_{\sun}, while above this mass galaxies with a higher n tend to be redder in the central NUV-r color. These results suggest that galaxies with M*<10^{10.2}M_{\sun} exhibit similar star formation activity from the inner R<R_{50} region to the R>R_{50} region. In contrast, a considerable fraction of the M*>10^{10.2}M_{\sun} galaxies, especially those with a high n, have harbored a relatively inactive bulge component.
  • We present a study on physical properties for a large distant red galaxy (DRG) sample, using the $K$-selected multi-band photometry catalog of the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field and the CANDELS NIR data. Our sample includes 4485 DRGs with $(J-K)_\mathrm{AB}>1.16$ and $K_\mathrm{AB}<$23.4 mag, and 132 DRGs have HST/WFC3 morphological measurements. The results of nonparametric measurements of DRG morphology are consistent with our rest-frame UVJ color classification: quiescent DRGs are generally compact while star-forming DRGs tend to have extended structures. We find the star formation rate (SFR) and the stellar mass of star-forming DRGs present tight "main sequence" relations in all redshift bins. Moreover, the specific SFR (sSFR) of DRGs increase with redshift in all stellar mass bins and DRGs with higher stellar masses generally have lower sSFRs, which indicates that galaxies were much more active on average in the past, and star formation contributes more to the mass growth of low-mass galaxies than to high-mass galaxies. The infrared (IR) derived SFR dominate the total SFR of DRGs which occupy the high-mass range, implying that the $J-K$ color criterion effectively selects massive and dusty galaxies. DRGs with higher $M_{*}$ generally have redder $(U-V)_\mathrm{rest}$ colors, and the $(U-V)_\mathrm{rest}$ colors of DRGs become bluer at higher redshifts, suggesting high-mass galaxies have higher internal dust extinctions or older stellar ages and they evolve with time. Finally, we find that DRGs have different overlaps with EROs, BzKs, IEROs and high-$z$ ULIRGs indicating DRGs is not a special population and they can also be selected by other color criteria.
  • We present a study on the physical properties of compact star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) with $M_{*}\geq10^{10}M_{\odot}$ and $2\leq z\leq3$ in the COSMOS and GOODS-S fields. We find that massive cSFGs have a comoving number density of $(1.0\pm0.1)\times10^{-4}~{\rm Mpc}^{-3}$. The cSFGs are distributed at nearly the same locus on the main sequence as extended star-forming galaxies (eSFGs) and dominate the high-mass end. On the rest-frame $U-V$ vs. $V-J$ and $U-B$ vs. $M_{\rm B}$ diagrams, cSFGs are mainly distributed at the middle of eSFGs and compact quiescent galaxies (cQGs) in all colors, but are more inclined to "red sequence" than "green valley" galaxies. We also find that cSFGs have distributions similar to cQGs on the nonparametric morphology diagrams. The cQGs and cSFGs have larger $Gini$ and smaller $M_{20}$, while eSFGs have the reverse. About one-third of cSFGs show signatures of postmergers, and almost none of them can be recognized as disks. Moreover, those visually extended cSFGs all have lower $Gini$ coefficients ($Gini<0.4$), indicating that the $Gini$ coefficient could be used to clean out noncompact galaxies in a sample of candidate cSFGs. The X-ray-detected counterparts are more frequent among cSFGs than that in eSFGs and cQGs, implying that cSFGs have previously experienced violent gas-rich interactions(such as major mergers or disk instabilities), which could trigger both star formation and black hole growth in an active phase.
  • In this Letter, we investigate how galaxy mass assembly mode depends on stellar mass $M_{\ast}$, using a large sample of $\sim$10, 000 low redshift galaxies. Our galaxy sample is selected to have SDSS $R_{90}>5\arcsec.0$, which allows the measures of both the integrated and the central NUV$-r$ color indices. We find that: in the $M_{\ast}-($ NUV$-r$) green valley, the $M_{\ast}<10^{10}~M_{\sun}$ galaxies mostly have positive or flat color gradients, while most of the $M_{\ast}>10^{10.5}~M_{\sun}$ galaxies have negative color gradients. When their central $D_{n}4000$ index values exceed 1.6, the $M_{\ast}<10^{10.0}~M_{\sun}$ galaxies have moved to the UV red sequence, whereas a large fraction of the $M_{\ast}>10^{10.5}~M_{\sun}$ galaxies still lie on the UV blue cloud or the green valley region. We conclude that the main galaxy assembly mode is transiting from "the outside-in" mode to "the inside-out" mode at $M_{\ast}< 10^{10}~M_{\sun}$ and at $M_{\ast}> 10^{10.5}~M_{\sun}$. We argue that the physical origin of this is the compromise between the internal and the external process that driving the star formation quenching in galaxies. These results can be checked with the upcoming large data produced by the on-going IFS survey projects, such as CALIFA, MaNGA and SAMI in the near future.
  • We analyze morphologies of the host galaxies of 35 X-ray selected active galactic nucleus (AGNs) at $z\sim2$ in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging taken from the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). We build a control sample of 350 galaxies in total, by selecting ten non-active galaxies drawn from the same field with the similar stellar mass and redshift for each AGN host. By performing two dimensional fitting with GALFIT on the surface brightness profile, we find that the distribution of S$\`e$rsic index (n) of AGN hosts does not show a statistical difference from that of the control sample. We measure the nonparametric morphological parameters (the asymmetry index A, the Gini coefficient G, the concentration index C and the M20 index) based on point source subtracted images. All the distributions of these morphological parameters of AGN hosts are consistent with those of the control sample. We finally investigate the fraction of distorted morphologies in both samples by visual classification. Only $\sim$15% of the AGN hosts have highly distorted morphologies, possibly due to a major merger or interaction. We find there is no significant difference in the distortion fractions between the AGN host sample and control sample. We conclude that the morphologies of X-ray selected AGN hosts are similar to those of nonactive galaxies and most AGN activity is not triggered by major merger.
  • We present a research of morphologies, spectra and environments of $\approx$ 2350 "green valley" galaxies at $0.2<z<1.0$ in the COSMOS field. The bimodality of dust-corrected \nuvr\ color is used to define "green valley" (thereafter, GV), which removes dusty star-forming galaxies from truly transiting galaxies between blue cloud and red sequence. Morphological parameters of green galaxies are intermediate between those of blue and red galaxy populations, both on the Gini--Asymmetry and the Gini--M$_{\rm 20}$ planes. Approximately 60% to 70% green disk galaxies have intermediate or big bulges, and only 5% to 10% are pure disk systems, based on the morphological classification with Zurich Estimator of Structural Types (ZEST). The obtained average spectra of green galaxies are intermediate between blue and red ones in terms of \oii\,, H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ emission lines. Stellar population synthesis on the average spectra show that green galaxies are averagely older than blue galaxies, but younger than red galaxies. Green galaxies have similar projected galaxy density ($\Sigma_{10}$) distribution with blue galaxies at $z>0.7$. At $z<0.7$, the fractions of $M_{\ast}<10^{10.0}M_{\sun}$ green galaxies located in dense environment are found to be significantly larger than those of blue galaxies. The morphological and spectral properties of green galaxies are consistent with the transiting population between blue cloud and red sequence. The possible mechanisms for quenching star formation activities in green galaxies are discussed. The importance of AGN feedback cannot be well constrained in our study. Finally, our findings suggest that environment conditions, most likely starvation and harassment, significantly affect the transformation of $M_{\ast}<10^{10.0}M_{\sun}$ blue galaxies into red galaxies, especially at $z<0.5$.
  • We build a sample of 298 spectroscopically-confirmed galaxies at redshift z~2, selected in the z-band from the GOODS-MUSIC catalog. By exploiting the rest frame 8 um luminosity as a proxy of the star formation rate (SFR) we check the accuracy of the standard SED-fitting technique, finding it is not accurate enough to provide reliable estimates of the galaxy physical parameters. We then develop a new SED-fitting method that includes the IR luminosity as a prior and a generalized Calzetti law with a variable RV . Then we exploit such a new method to re-analyze our galaxy sample, and to robustly determine SFRs, stellar masses and ages. We find that there is a general trend of increasing attenuation with the SFR. Moreover, we find that the SFRs range between a few to 1000 solar mass per year, the masses from one billion to 400 billion solar masses, while the ages from a few tens of Myr to more than 1 Gyr. We discuss how individual age easurements of highly attenuated objects indicate that dust must form within a few tens of Myr and be copious already at ~100 Myr. In addition, we find that low luminous galaxies harbor, on average, significantly older stellar populations and are also less massive than brighter ones; we discuss how these findings and the well known 'downsizing' scenario are consistent in a framework where less massive galaxies form first, but their star formation lasts longer. Finally, we find that the near-IR attenuation is not scarce for luminous objects, contrary to what is customarily assumed; we discuss how this affects the interpretation of the observed mass-to-light ratios.
  • In this letter, we use a two-color (J-L) vs. (V-J) selection criteria to search massive, quiescent galaxy candidates at 2.5<z<4.0 in the CANDELS-COSMOS field. We construct a H-selected catalogue and complement it with public auxiliary data. We finally obtain 19 passive VJL-selected (hereafter pVJL) galaxies as the possible massive quiescent galaxy candidates at z~3 by several constrains. We find the sizes of our pVJL galaxies are on average 3-4 times smaller than those of local ETGs with analogous stellar mass. The compact size of these z~3 galaxies can be modelled by assuming their formation at z ~ 4-6 according to the dissipative collapse of baryons. Up to z<4, the mass-normalized size evolution can be described by $r_e\propto (1+z)^{-1.0}$. Low Sersic index and axis ratio, with median values n~1.5 and b/a~0.65 respectively, indicate most of pVJL galaxies are disk-dominated. Despite large uncertainty, the inner region of the median mass profile of our pVJL galaxies is similar to those of quiescent galaxies (QGs) at 0.5<z<2.5 and local Early-type galaxies (ETGs). It indicates local massive ETGs have been formed according to an inside-out scenario: the compact galaxies at high redshift make up the cores of local massive ETGs and then build up the outskirts according to dissipationless minor mergers.
  • In a systematic search over 11 cluster fields from Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH) we identify ten passively evolving massive galaxies at redshift z~2.We derive the stellar properties of these galaxies using HST WFC3/ACS multiband data, together with Spitzer IRAC observations. We also deduce the optical rest-frame effective radius of these high redshift objects. The derived stellar masses and measured effective radii have been corrected by the lensing magnification factors, which are estimated by simply adopting the spherical NFW model for the foreground cluster lens. The observed near-IR images, obtained by HST WFC3 camera with high spatial resolution and lensed by the foreground clusters, enable us to study the structures of such systems. Nine out of ten galaxies have on average three times smaller effective radius than local ETGs of similar stellar masses, in agreement with previous works at redshift 1.5 < z < 2.5. Combined with literature data for z~2, we find that the mass-normalized effective radius scales with redshift as re/M^0.56 \propto (1 + z)^{-1.13}. We confirm that their size distribution shows a large scatter: from normal size to ~5 times smaller compared to local ETGs with similar stellar masses. The 1-{\sigma} scatter {\sigma}_{logre} of the size distribution is 0.22 and 0.34 at z~1.6 and z~2.1,respectively.The observed large size scatter has to be carefully taken into account in galaxy evolution model predictions.
  • We compile a large sample of broad absorption lines (BAL) quasars with X-ray observations from the \xmm archive data and Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5. The sample consists of 41 BAL QSOs. Among 26 BAL quasars detected in X-ray, spectral analysis is possible for twelve objects. X-ray absorption is detected in all of them. Complementary to that of \citet{gall06} (thereafter G06), our sample spans wide ranges of both BALnicity Index (BI) and maximum outflow velocity (\vmax). Combining our sample with G06's, we find very significant correlations between the intrinsic X-ray weakness with both BALnicity Index (BI) and the maximum velocity of absorption trough. We do not confirm the previous claimed correlation between absorption column density and broad absorption line parameters. We tentatively interpret this as that X-ray absorption is necessary to the production of the BAL outflow, but the properties of the outflow are largely determined by intrinsic SED of the quasars.