• Interferometric phase measurement is widely used to precisely determine quantities such as length, speed, and material properties. Without quantum correlations, the best phase sensitivity $\Delta\varphi$ achievable using $n$ photons is the shot noise limit (SNL), $\Delta\varphi=1/\sqrt{n}$. Quantum-enhanced metrology promises better sensitivity, but despite theoretical proposals stretching back decades, no measurement using photonic (i.e. definite photon number) quantum states has truly surpassed the SNL. Rather, all such demonstrations --- by discounting photon loss, detector inefficiency, or other imperfections --- have considered only a subset of the photons used. Here, we use an ultra-high efficiency photon source and detectors to perform unconditional entanglement-enhanced photonic interferometry. Sampling a birefringent phase shift, we demonstrate precision beyond the SNL without artificially correcting our results for loss and imperfections. Our results enable quantum-enhanced phase measurements at low photon flux and open the door to the next generation of optical quantum metrology advances.
  • From dice to modern complex circuits, there have been many attempts to build increasingly better devices to generate random numbers. Today, randomness is fundamental to security and cryptographic systems, as well as safeguarding privacy. A key challenge with random number generators is that it is hard to ensure that their outputs are unpredictable. For a random number generator based on a physical process, such as a noisy classical system or an elementary quantum measurement, a detailed model describing the underlying physics is required to assert unpredictability. Such a model must make a number of assumptions that may not be valid, thereby compromising the integrity of the device. However, it is possible to exploit the phenomenon of quantum nonlocality with a loophole-free Bell test to build a random number generator that can produce output that is unpredictable to any adversary limited only by general physical principles. With recent technological developments, it is now possible to carry out such a loophole-free Bell test. Here we present certified randomness obtained from a photonic Bell experiment and extract 1024 random bits uniform to within $10^{-12}$. These random bits could not have been predicted within any physical theory that prohibits superluminal signaling and allows one to make independent measurement choices. To certify and quantify the randomness, we describe a new protocol that is optimized for apparatuses characterized by a low per-trial violation of Bell inequalities. We thus enlisted an experimental result that fundamentally challenges the notion of determinism to build a system that can increase trust in random sources. In the future, random number generators based on loophole-free Bell tests may play a role in increasing the security and trust of our cryptographic systems and infrastructure.
  • Entanglement is the key resource for many long-range quantum information tasks, including secure communication and fundamental tests of quantum physics. These tasks require robust verification of shared entanglement, but performing it over long distances is presently technologically intractable because the loss through an optical fiber or free-space channel opens up a detection loophole. We design and experimentally demonstrate a scheme that verifies entanglement in the presence of at least $14.8\pm0.1$ dB of added loss, equivalent to approximately $80$ km of telecommunication fiber. Our protocol relies on entanglement swapping to herald the presence of a photon after the lossy channel, enabling event-ready implementation of quantum steering. This result overcomes the key barrier in device-independent communication under realistic high-loss scenarios and in the realization of a quantum repeater.
  • Random numbers are an important resource for applications such as numerical simulation and secure communication. However, it is difficult to certify whether a physical random number generator is truly unpredictable. Here, we exploit the phenomenon of quantum nonlocality in a loophole-free photonic Bell test experiment for the generation of randomness that cannot be predicted within any physical theory that allows one to make independent measurement choices and prohibits superluminal signaling. To certify and quantify the randomness, we describe a new protocol that performs well in an experimental regime characterized by low violation of Bell inequalities. Applying an extractor function to our data, we obtained 256 new random bits, uniform to within 0.001.
  • The statistical properties of photons are fundamental to investigating quantum mechanical phenomena using light. In multi-photon, two-mode systems, correlations may exist between outcomes of measurements made on each mode which exhibit useful properties. Correlation in this sense can be thought of as increasing the probability of a particular outcome of a measurement on one subsystem given a measurement on a correlated subsystem. Here, we show a statistical property we call "discorrelation," in which the probability of a particular outcome of one subsystem is reduced to zero, given a measurement on a discorrelated subsystem. We show how such a state can be constructed using readily available building blocks of quantum optics, namely coherent states, single photons, beam splitters and projective measurement. We present a variety of discorrelated states, show that they are entangled, and study their sensitivity to loss.
  • We present a loophole-free violation of local realism using entangled photon pairs. We ensure that all relevant events in our Bell test are spacelike separated by placing the parties far enough apart and by using fast random number generators and high-speed polarization measurements. A high-quality polarization-entangled source of photons, combined with high-efficiency, low-noise, single-photon detectors, allows us to make measurements without requiring any fair-sampling assumptions. Using a hypothesis test, we compute p-values as small as $5.9\times 10^{-9}$ for our Bell violation while maintaining the spacelike separation of our events. We estimate the degree to which a local realistic system could predict our measurement choices. Accounting for this predictability, our smallest adjusted p-value is $2.3 \times 10^{-7}$. We therefore reject the hypothesis that local realism governs our experiment.
  • We present a source of polarization entangled photon pairs based on spontaneous parametric downconversion engineered for frequency uncorrelated telecom photon generation. Our source provides photon pairs that display, simultaneously, the key properties for high-performance quantum information and fundamental quantum science tasks. Specifically, the source provides for high heralding efficiency, high quantum state purity and high entangled state fidelity at the same time. Among different tests we apply to our source we observe almost perfect non-classical interference between photons from independent sources with a visibility of $(100\pm5)\%$.
  • Local realism is the worldview in which physical properties of objects exist independently of measurement and where physical influences cannot travel faster than the speed of light. Bell's theorem states that this worldview is incompatible with the predictions of quantum mechanics, as is expressed in Bell's inequalities. Previous experiments convincingly supported the quantum predictions. Yet, every experiment requires assumptions that provide loopholes for a local realist explanation. Here we report a Bell test that closes the most significant of these loopholes simultaneously. Using a well-optimized source of entangled photons, rapid setting generation, and highly efficient superconducting detectors, we observe a violation of a Bell inequality with high statistical significance. The purely statistical probability of our results to occur under local realism does not exceed $3.74 \times 10^{-31}$, corresponding to an 11.5 standard deviation effect.
  • Non-classical states of light are of fundamental importance for emerging quantum technologies. All optics experiments producing multi-qubit entangled states have until now relied on outcome post-selection, a procedure where only the measurement results corresponding to the desired state are considered. This method severely limits the usefulness of the resulting entangled states. Here, we show the direct production of polarization-entangled photon triplets by cascading two entangled downconversion processes. Detecting the triplets with high efficiency superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors allows us to fully characterize them through quantum state tomography. We use our three-photon entangled state to demonstrate the ability to herald Bell states, a task which was not possible with previous three-photon states, and test local realism by violating the Mermin and Svetlichny inequalities. These results represent a significant breakthrough for entangled multi-photon state production by eliminating the constraints of outcome post-selection, providing a novel resource for optical quantum information processing.
  • The double-slit experiment strikingly demonstrates the wave-particle duality of quantum objects. In this famous experiment, particles pass one-by-one through a pair of slits and are detected on a distant screen. A distinct wave-like pattern emerges after many discrete particle impacts as if each particle is passing through both slits and interfering with itself. While the direct event-by-event buildup of this interference pattern has been observed for massive particles such as electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules, it has not yet been measured for massless particles like photons. Here we present a temporally- and spatially-resolved measurement of the double-slit interference pattern using single photons. We send single photons through a birefringent double-slit apparatus and use a linear array of single-photon detectors to observe the developing interference pattern. The analysis of the buildup allows us to compare quantum mechanics and the corpuscular model, which aims to explain the mystery of single-particle interference. Finally, we send one photon from an entangled pair through our double-slit setup and show the dependence of the resulting interference pattern on the twin photon's measured state. Our results provide new insight into the dynamics of the buildup process in the double-slit experiment, and can be used as a valuable resource in quantum information applications.
  • We demonstrate a novel polarization-entangled photon-pair source based on standard birefringent polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The source consists of two stretches of fiber spliced together with perpendicular polarization axes, and has the potential to be fully fiber-based, with all bulk optics replaced with in-fiber equivalents. By modelling the temporal walk-off in the fibers, we implement compensation necessary for the photon creation processes in the two stretches of fiber to be indistinguishable. Our source subsequently produces a high quality entangled state having (92.2 \pm 0.2) % fidelity with a maximally entangled Bell state.
  • Entangled quantum particles have correlations stronger than those allowed by classical physics. These correlations are the focus of of the deepest issues in quantum mechanics [1-3] and are the basis of many quantum technologies. The entanglement of discrete particle properties has been studied extensively in the context of quantum computing [4], cryptography [5], and quantum repeaters [6] while entanglement between the continuous properties of particles may play a critical role in improving the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors [7,8], atomic clocks [9], and other high precision instruments. The attributes of three or more entangled particles are fundamentally different from those of two entangled particles [10-14]. While the discrete variables of up to 14 ions [15] and the continuous variables between three intense optical beams [16, 17] have been entangled, it has remained an open challenge to entangle the continuous properties of more than two individual particles. Here we experimentally demonstrate genuine tripartite continuous-variable entanglement between three separated particles. In our setup the three particles are photons created directly from a single input photon; the creation process leads to quantum correlations between the colours, or energies, and emission times of the photons. The entanglement between our three photons is the three-party generalization of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) [1] correlations for continuous variables, and allows for new fundamental tests of quantum mechanics to be carried out. Our scheme can be extended to carry out multi-particle Franson interferometry [18,19], and opens the possibility of using additional degrees of freedom in our photons to simultaneously engineer discrete and continuous-variable hyper-entangled states that could serve as a valuable resource in a wide variety of quantum information tasks.
  • In arXiv:1107.4675 Ralph uses our post-selection model of closed timelike curves (P-CTC) to construct an "unproven-theorem" paradox, and claims that this voids our argument that P-CTCs are able to resolve such types of paradoxes. Here we point out that Ralph has not accounted for all the interactions needed for his construction. A more careful analysis confirms that indeed there is no paradox, contrary to his claims.
  • Closed timelike curves (CTCs) are trajectories in spacetime that effectively travel backwards in time: a test particle following a CTC can in principle interact with its former self in the past. CTCs appear in many solutions of Einstein's field equations and any future quantum version of general relativity will have to reconcile them with the requirements of quantum mechanics and of quantum field theory. A widely accepted quantum theory of CTCs was proposed by Deutsch. Here we explore an alternative quantum formulation of CTCs and show that it is physically inequivalent to Deutsch's. Because it is based on combining quantum teleportation with post-selection, the predictions/retrodictions of our theory are experimentally testable: we report the results of an experiment demonstrating our theory's resolution of the well-known `grandfather paradox.