• Modified gravity (MOG) is a covariant, relativistic, alternative gravitational theory whose field equations are derived from an action that supplements the spacetime metric tensor with vector and scalar fields. Both gravitational (spin 2) and electromagnetic waves travel on null geodesics of the theory's one metric. Despite a recent claim to the contrary, MOG satisfies the weak equivalence principle and is consistent with observations of the neutron star merger and gamma ray burster event GW170817/GRB170817A.
  • The Fe1+xTe phase diagram consists of two distinct magnetic structures with collinear order present at low interstitial iron concentrations and a helical phase at large values of x with these phases separated by a Lifshitz point. We use unpolarized single crystal diffraction to confirm the helical phase for large interstitial iron concentrations and polarized single crystal diffraction to demonstrate the collinear order for the iron deficient side of the Fe1+xTe phase diagram. Polarized neutron inelastic scattering show that the fluctuations associated with this collinear order are predominately transverse at low energy transfers, consistent with a localized magnetic moment picture. We then apply neutron inelastic scattering and polarization analysis to investigate the dynamics and structure near the boundary between collinear and helical order in the Fe1+xTe phase diagram. We first show that the phase separating collinear and helical order is characterized by a spin-density wave with a single propagation wave vector of (~ 0.45, 0, 0.5). We do not observe harmonics or the presence of a charge density wave. The magnetic fluctuations associated with this wavevector are different from the collinear phase being strongly longitudinal in nature and correlated anisotropically in the (H,K) plane. The excitations preserve the C4 symmetry of the lattice, but display different widths in momentum along the two tetragonal directions at low energy transfers. While the low energy excitations and minimal magnetic phase diagram can be understood in terms of localized interactions, we suggest that the presence of density wave phase implies the importance of electronic and orbital properties.
  • The crystal and magnetic structures of stoichiometric ZnCr2Se4 have been investigated using synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction, muon spin relaxation (muSR) and inelastic neutron scattering. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction shows a spin-lattice distortion from the cubic spinel to a tetragonal I41/amd lattice below TN = 21 K, where powder neutron diffraction confirms the formation of a helical magnetic structure with magnetic moment of 3.04(3) {\mu}B at 1.5 K; close to that expected for high-spin Cr3+. MuSR measurements show prominent local spin correlations that are established at temperatures considerably higher (< 100 K) than the onset of long range magnetic order. The stretched exponential nature of the relaxation in the local spin correlation regime suggests a wide distribution of depolarizing fields. Below TN, unusually fast (> 100 {\mu}s-1) muon relaxation rates are suggestive of rapid site hopping of the muons in static field. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements show a gapless mode at an incommensurate propagation vector of k = (0 0 0.4648(2)) in the low temperature magnetic ordered phase that extends to 0.8 meV. The dispersion is modelled by a two parameter Hamiltonian, containing ferromagnetic nearest neighbor and antiferromagnetic next nearest neighbor interactions with a Jnnn/Jnn = -0.337.
  • CaFe$_{2}$O$_{4}$ is a $S={5\over 2}$ anisotropic antiferromagnet based upon zig-zag chains having two competing magnetic structures, denoted as the A ($\uparrow \uparrow \downarrow \downarrow$) and B ($\uparrow \downarrow \uparrow \downarrow$) phases, which differ by the $c$-axis stacking of ferromagnetic stripes. We apply neutron scattering to demonstrate that the competing A and B phase order parameters results in magnetic antiphase boundaries along $c$ which freeze on the timescale of $\sim$ 1 ns at the onset of magnetic order at 200 K. Using high resolution neutron spectroscopy, we find quantized spin wave levels and measure 9 such excitations localized in regions $\sim$ 1-2 $c$-axis lattice constants in size. We discuss these in the context of solitary magnons predicted to exist in anisotropic systems. The magnetic anisotropy affords both competing A+B orders as well as localization of spin excitations in a classical magnet.
  • Neutron spectroscopy is used to investigate the magnetic fluctuations in Fe_{1+x}Te - a parent compound of chalcogenide superconductors. Incommensurate "stripe-like" excitations soften with increased interstitial iron concentration. The energy crossover from incommensurate to stripy fluctuations defines an apparent hour-glass dispersion. Application of sum rules of neutron scattering find that the integrated intensity is inconsistent with an S=1 Fe^{2+} ground state and significantly less than S=2 predicted from weak crystal field arguments pointing towards the Fe^{2+} being in a superposition of orbital states. The results suggest that a highly anisotropic order competes with superconductivity in chalcogenide systems.
  • We construct a phase diagram of the parent compound Fe1+xTe as a function of interstitial iron x in terms of the electronic, structural, and magnetic properties. For a concentration of x < 10%, Fe1+xTe undergoes a "semimetal" to metal transition at approximately 70 K that is also first-order and coincident with a structural transition from a tetragonal to a monoclinic unit cell. For x ~ 14%, Fe1+xTe undergoes a second-order phase transition at approximately 58 K corresponding to a "semimetal" to "semimetal" transition along with a structural orthorhombic distortion. At a critical concentration of x ~ 11%, Fe1+xTe undergoes two transitions: the higher temperature one is a second-order transition to an orthorhombic phase with incommensurate magnetic ordering and temperature-dependent propagation vector, while the lower temperature one corresponds to nucleation of a monoclinic phase with a nearly commensurate magnetic wavevector. While both structural and magnetic transitions display similar critical behavior for x < 10% and near the critical concentration of x ~ 11%, samples with large interstitial iron concentrations show a marked deviation between the critical response indicating a decoupling of the order parameters. Analysis of temperature dependent inelastic neutron data reveals incommensurate magnetic fluctuations throughout the Fe1+xTe phase diagram are directly connected to the "semiconductor"-like resistivity above T_N and implicates scattering from spin fluctuations as the primary reason for the semiconducting or poor metallic properties. The results suggest that doping driven Fermi surface nesting maybe the origin of the gapless and incommensurate spin response at large interstitial concentrations.
  • The electronic structure of superconducting Fe1.03Te0.94S0.06 has been studied by angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Experimental band topography is compared to the calculations using the methods of Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) with coherent potential approximation (CPA) and linearized augmented plane wave with local orbitals (LAPW+LO). The region of the Gamma point exhibits two hole pockets and a quasiparticle peak close to the chemical potential with undetectable dispersion. This flat band with mainly dz2 orbital character is formed most likely by the top of the outer hole pocket or is an evidence of the third hole band. It may cover up to 3 % of the Brillouin zone volume and should give rise to a Van Hove singularity. Studies performed for various photon energies indicate that at least one of the hole pockets has a two-dimensional character. The apparently nondispersing peak at the chemical potential is clearly visible for 40 eV and higher photon energies, due to an effect of photoionisation cross section rather than band dimensionality. Orbital characters calculated by LAPW+LO for stoichiometric FeTe do not reveal the flat dz2 band but are in agreement with the experiment for the other dispersions around Gamma in Fe1.03Te0.94S0.06.
  • Combining in-depth neutron diffraction and systematic bulk studies, we discover that the $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ Fe vacancy order with its associated block antiferromagnetic order is the ground state, with varying occupancy ratio of the iron 16i and vacancy 4d sites, across the phase-diagram of K$_{\bf x}$Fe$_{\bf 2-y}$Se$_2$. The orthorhombic order with one of the four Fe sites vacant appears only at intermediate temperature as a competing phase. The material experiences an insulator to metal crossover when the $\sqrt{5}\times\sqrt{5}$ order has highly developed. Superconductivity occurs in such a metallic phase.
  • 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied to investigate the superconductor parent compound Fe(1+x)Te for x=0.06, 0.10, 0.14, 0.18 within the temperature range 4.2 K - 300 K. A spin density wave (SDW) within the iron atoms occupying regular tetrahedral sites was observed with the square root of the mean square amplitude at 4.2 K varying between 9.7 T and 15.7 T with increasing x. Three additional magnetic spectral components appeared due to the interstitial iron distributed over available sites between the Fe-Te layers. The excess iron showed hyperfine fields at approximately 16 T, 21 T and 49 T for three respective components at 4.2 K. The component with a large field of 49 T indicated the presence of isolated iron atoms with large localized magnetic moment in interstitial positions. Magnetic ordering of the interstitial iron disappeared in accordance with the fallout of the SDW with the increasing temperature.
  • Using neutron inelastic scattering, we investigate the role of interstitial iron on the low-energy spin fluctuations in powder samples of Fe_{1+x}Te_{0.7}Se_{0.3}. We demonstrate how combining the principle of detailed balance along with measurements at several temperatures allows us to subtract both temperature-independent and phonon backgrounds from S(Q,\omega) to obtain purely magnetic scattering. For small values of interstitial iron (x=0.009(3)), the sample is superconducting (T_{c}=14 K) and displays a spin gap of 7 meV peaked in momentum at wave vector q_{0}=(\pi,\pi) consistent with single crystal results. On populating the interstitial iron sites, the superconducting volume fraction decreases and we observe a filling in of the low-energy magnetic fluctuations and a decrease of the characteristic wave vector of the magnetic fluctuations. For large concentrations of interstitial iron (x=0.048(2)) where the superconducting volume fraction is minimal, we observe the presence of gapless spin fluctuations at a wave vector of q_{0}=(\pi,0). We estimate the absolute total moment for the various samples and find that the amount of interstitial iron does not change the total magnetic spectral weight significantly, but rather has the effect of shifting the spectral weight in Q and energy. These results show that the superconducting and magnetic properties can be tuned by doping small amounts of iron and are suggestive that interstitial iron concentration is also a controlling dopant in the Fe_{1+x}Te_{1-y}Se_{y} phase diagram in addition to the Te/Se ratio.
  • We present the magnetic structure of the itinerant monoarsenide, FeAs, with the B31 structure. Powder neutron diffraction confirms incommensurate modulated magnetism with wavevector $\mathbf{q} = (0.395\pm0.001)\mathbf{c}^*$ at 4 K, but cannot distinguish between a simple spiral and a collinear spin-density wave structure. Polarized single crystal diffraction confirms that the structure is best described as a non-collinear spin-density wave arising from a combination of itinerant and localized behavior with spin amplitude along the b-axis direction being (15 $\pm$ 5)% larger than in the a-direction. Furthermore, the propagation vector is temperature dependence, and the magnetization near the critical point indicates a two-dimensional Heisenberg system. The nature of the magnetism in the simplest iron arsenide is of fundamental importance in understanding the interplay between localized and itinerant magnetism and superconductivity.
  • Using neutron inelastic scattering, we investigate the low-energy spin fluctuations in Fe1+xTe as a function of both temperature and interstitial iron concentration. For Fe1.057(7)Te the magnetic structure is defined by a commensurate wavevector of (1/2,0,1/2). The spin fluctuations are gapped with a sharp onset at 7 meV and are three dimensional in momentum transfer, becoming two dimensional at higher energy transfers. On doping with interstitial iron, we find in Fe1.141(5)Te the ordering wavevector is located at the (0.38, 0, 1/2) position and the fluctuations are gapless with the intensity peaked at an energy transfer of 4 meV. These results show that the spin fluctuations in the Fe1+xTe system a can be tuned not only through selenium doping, but also with interstitial iron. We also compare these results with superconducting concentrations and in particular the resonance mode in the Fe_1+xTe_1-ySe_y system.
  • With single crystal X-ray diffraction studies, we compare the structures of three sample showing optimal superconductivity, K0.774(4)Fe1.613(2)Se2, K0.738(6)Fe1.631(3)Se2 and Cs0.748(2)Fe1.626(1)Se2. All have an almost identical ordered vacancy structure with a ({\sqrt}5 x {\sqrt}5 x 1) super cell. The tetragonal unit cell, space group I4/m, possesses lattice parameters at 250K of a = b = 8.729(2) {\AA} and c = 14.120(3) {\AA}, a = b = 8.7186(12) {\AA} and c = 14.0853(19) {\AA} and at 295 K, a = b = 8.8617(16) {\AA} and c = 15.304(3) {\AA} for the three crystals, respectively. The structure contains two iron sites; one is almost completely empty, whilst the other is fully occupied. There are similarly two alkali metal sites that are occupied in the range of 72.2(2) % to 85.3(3) %. The inclusion of alkali metals and the presence of vacancies within the structure allows for considerable relaxation of the FeSe4 tetrahedron, compared with members of the Fe(Te, Se, S) series, and the resulting shift of the Se - F - Se bond angles to less distorted geometry could be important in understanding the associated increase in the superconducting transition temperature. The structure of these superconductors distinguishes themselves from the structure of the non-superconducting phases by an almost complete absence of Fe on the (0 0.5 0.25) site as well as lower alkali metal occupancy that ensures an exact Fe2+ oxidation state, which are clearly critical parameters in the promotion of superconductivity.
  • The discovery of cuprate high Tc superconductors has inspired searching for unconventional su- perconductors in magnetic materials. A successful recipe has been to suppress long-range order in a magnetic parent compound by doping or high pressure to drive the material towards a quantum critical point, which is replicated in recent discovery of iron-based high TC superconductors. The long-range magnetic order coexisting with superconductivity has either a small magnetic moment or low ordering temperature in all previously established examples. Here we report an exception to this rule in the recently discovered potassium iron selenide. The superconducting composition is identified as the iron vacancy ordered K0.8Fe1.6Se2 with Tc above 30 K. A novel large moment 3.31 {\mu}B/Fe antiferromagnetic order which conforms to the tetragonal crystal symmetry has the unprecedentedly high an ordering temperature TN = 559 K for a bulk superconductor. Staggeredly polarized electronic density of states thus is suspected, which would stimulate further investigation into superconductivity in a strong spin-exchange field under new circumstance.
  • Thin films composed of Ge nanocrystals embedded in amorphous SiO2 matrix (Ge-NCs TFs) were prepared using a low temperature in-situ growth method. Unexpected high p-type conductivity was observed in the intrinsic Ge-NCs TFs. Unintentional doping from shallow dopants was excluded as a candidate mechanism of hole generation. Instead, the p-type characteristic was attributed to surface state induced hole accumulation in NCs, and the hole conduction was found to be a thermally activated process involving charge hopping from one NC to its nearest neighbor. Theoretical analysis has shown that the density of surface states in Ge-NCs is sufficient to induce adequate holes for measured conductivity. The film conductivity can be improved significantly by post-growth rapid thermal annealing and this effect is explained by a simple thermodynamic model. The impact of impurities on the conduction properties was also studied. Neither compensation nor enhancement in conduction was observed in the Sb and Ga doped Ge-NCs TFs, respectively. This could be attributed to the fact that these impurities are no longer shallow dopants in NCs and are much less likely to be effectively activated. Finally, the photovoltaic effect of heterojunction diodes employing such Ge-NCs TFs was characterized in order to demonstrate its functionality in device implementation.
  • The superconducting series, Fe(Te,Se), has a complex structural and magnetic phase diagram that is dependent on composition and occupancy of a secondary interstitial Fe site. In this letter, we show that superconductivity in Fe1+xTe0.7Se0.3 can be enhanced by topotactic deintercalation of the interstitial iron, demonstrating the competing roles of the two iron sites. Neutron diffraction reveals a flattening of the Fe(Te,Se)4 tetrahedron on Fe removal of iron and an increase in negative thermal expansion within the ab plane that correlates with increased lattice strain. Inelastic neutron scattering shows that a gapped excitation at 6 meV, evolves into gapless paramagnetic scattering with increasing iron; similar to the fluctuations observed for non-superconducting Fe1+xTe itself.
  • Neutron and x-ray diffraction studies of Ba(Fe{1-x}Mn{x})2As2 for low doping concentrations (x <= 0.176) reveal that at a critical concentration, 0.102 < x < 0.118, the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic transition abruptly disappears whereas magnetic ordering with a propagation vector of (1/2 1/2 1) persists. Among all of the iron arsenides this observation is unique to Mn-doping, and unexpected because all models for "stripe-like" antiferromagnetic order anticipate an attendant orthorhombic distortion due to magnetoelastic effects. We discuss these observations and their consequences in terms of previous studies of Ba(Fe{1-x}TM{x})2As2 compounds (TM = Transition Metal), and models for magnetic ordering in the iron arsenide compounds.
  • Neutron diffraction measurements have been performed on a powder sample of BaMn2As2 over the temperature T range from 10 K to 675 K. These measurements demonstrate that this compound exhibits collinear antiferromagnetic ordering below the Neel temperature T_N = 625(1) K. The ordered moment mu = 3.88(4) mu_B/Mn at T = 10 K is oriented along the c axis and the magnetic structure is G-type, with all nearest-neighbor Mn moments antiferromagnetically aligned. The value of the ordered moment indicates that the oxidation state of Mn is Mn^{2+} with a high spin S = 5/2. The T dependence of mu suggests that the magnetic transition is second-order in nature. In contrast to the closely related AFe2As2 (A = Ca, Sr, Ba, Eu) compounds, no structural distortion is observed in the magnetically ordered state of BaMn2As2.
  • Using elastic and inelastic neutron scattering techniques, we show that upon cooling a spatially anisotropic triangular antiferromagnet Ag$_2$MnO$_2$ freezes below $T_f ~\sim 50$ K into short range collinear state. The static spin correlations are extremely two-dimensional, and the spin fluctuations are gapless with two characteristic relaxation rates that behave linearly with temperature.
  • We use neutron scattering to show that replacing the larger arsenic with smaller phosphorus in CeFeAs(1-x)P(x)O simultaneously suppresses the AF order and orthorhombic distortion near x = 0.4, providing evidence for a magnetic quantum critical point. Furthermore, we find that the pnictogen height in iron arsenide is an important controlling parameter for their electronic and magnetic properties, and may play an important role in electron pairing and superconductivity.
  • We report the observation of superconductivity in La3Ni4P4O2 at 2.2 K. The layer stacking in this compound results in an asymmetric distribution of charge reservoir layers around the Ni2P2 planes. The estimated Wilson ratio, Rw ~ 5, indicates the presence of a strongly enhanced normal state susceptibility, but many of the basic superconducting characteristics are conventional. The estimated electronic contribution to the specific heat, gamma ~ 6.2 mJ mol-Ni^-1K^-2, is about 2/3 of that found in layered nickel borocarbide superconductors.
  • Recent investigations of the superconducting iron-arsenide families have highlighted the role of pressure, be it chemical or mechanical, in fostering superconductivity. Here we report that CaFe2As2 undergoes a pressure-induced transition to a non-magnetic, volume "collapsed" tetragonal phase, which becomes superconducting at lower temperature. Spin-polarized total-energy calculations on the collapsed structure reveal that the magnetic Fe moment itself collapses, consistent with the absence of magnetic order in neutron diffraction.
  • We use neutron scattering to study the structural and magnetic phase transitions in the iron pnictides CeFeAsO1-xFx as the system is tuned from a semimetal to a high-transition-temperature (high-Tc) superconductor through Fluorine (F) doping x. In the undoped state, CeFeAsO develops a structural lattice distortion followed by a stripe like commensurate antiferromagnetic order with decreasing temperature. With increasing Fluorine doping, the structural phase transition decreases gradually while the antiferromagnetic order is suppressed before the appearance of superconductivity, resulting an electronic phase diagram remarkably similar to that of the high-Tc copper oxides. Comparison of the structural evolution of CeFeAsO1-xFx with other Fe-based superconductors reveals that the effective electronic band width decreases systematically for materials with higher Tc. The results suggest that electron correlation effects are important for the mechanism of high-Tc superconductivity in these Fe pnictides.
  • DC and ac magnetization, resistivity, specific heat, and neutron diffraction data reveal that stoichiometric LaOFeP is metallic and non-superconducting above T = 0.35 K, with gamma = 12.5 mJ/mol*K. Neutron diffraction data at room temperature and T = 10 K are well described by the stoichiometric, tetragonal ZrCuSiAs structure and show no signs of structural distortions or long range magnetic ordering, to an estimated detectability limit of 0.07 uB/Fe. We propose a model, based on the shape of the iron-pnictide tetrahedron, that explains the differences between LaOFeP and LaOFeAs, the parent compound of the recently discovered high-Tc oxyarsenides, which, in contrast, shows both structural and spin density wave (SDW) transitions.
  • The rare earth pyrochlore material Gd2Ti2O7 is considered to be an ideal model frustrated Heisenberg antiferromagnet with additional dipolar interactions. For this system there are several untested theoretical predictions of the ground state ordering pattern. Here we establish the magnetic structure of isotopically enriched (160)Gd2Ti2O7, using powder neutron diffraction at a temperature of 50 mK. The magnetic structure at this temperature is a partially ordered, non-collinear antiferromagnetic structure, with propagation vector k= 1/2 1/2 1/2. It can be described as a set of "q=0" ordered kagome planes separated by zero interstitial moments. This magnetic structure agrees with theory only in part, leaving an interesting problem for future research.