• PMN J1603$-$4904 is a likely member of the rare class of $\gamma$-ray emitting young radio galaxies. Only one other source, PKS 1718$-$649, has been confirmed so far. These objects, which may transition into larger radio galaxies, are a stepping stone to understanding AGN evolution. It is not completely clear how these young galaxies, seen edge-on, can produce high-energy $\gamma$-rays. PMN J1603$-$4904 has been detected by TANAMI Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations and has been followed-up with multiwavelength observations. A Fermi/LAT $\gamma$-ray source has been associated with it in the LAT catalogs. We have obtained Chandra observations of the source in order to consider the possibility of source confusion, due to the relatively large positional uncertainty of Fermi/LAT. The goal was to investigate the possibility of other X-ray bright sources in the vicinity of PMN J1603$-$4904 that could be counterparts to the $\gamma$-ray emission. With Chandra/ACIS, we find no other sources in the uncertainty ellipse of Fermi/LAT data, which includes an improved localization analysis of 8 years of data. We further study the X-ray fluxes and spectra. We conclude that PMN J1603$-$4904 is indeed the second confirmed $\gamma$-ray bright young radio galaxy.
  • TANAMI is a multiwavelength program monitoring active galactic nuclei (AGN) south of -30deg declination including high-resolution Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging, radio, optical/UV, X-ray and gamma-ray studies. We have previously published first-epoch 8.4GHz VLBI images of the parsec-scale structure of the initial sample. In this paper, we present images of 39 additional sources. The full sample comprises most of the radio- and gamma-ray brightest AGN in the southern quarter of the sky, overlapping with the region from which high-energy (>100TeV) neutrino events have been found. We characterize the parsec-scale radio properties of the jets and compare with the quasi-simultaneous Fermi/LAT gamma-ray data. Furthermore, we study the jet properties of sources which are in positional coincidence with high-energy neutrino events as compared to the full sample. We test the positional agreement of high-energy neutrino events with various AGN samples. Our observations yield the first images of many jets below -30deg declination at milliarcsecond resolution. We find that gamma-ray loud TANAMI sources tend to be more compact on parsec-scales and have higher core brightness temperatures than gamma-ray faint jets, indicating higher Doppler factors. No significant structural difference is found between sources in positional coincidence with high-energy neutrino events and other TANAMI jets. The 22 gamma-ray brightest AGN in the TANAMI sky show only a weak positional agreement with high-energy neutrinos demonstrating that the >100TeV IceCube signal is not simply dominated by a small number of the $\gamma$-ray brightest blazars. Instead, a larger number of sources have to contribute to the signal with each individual source having only a small Poisson probability for producing an event in multi-year integrations of current neutrino detectors.
  • Supermassive black holes (SMBH) are essential for the production of jets in radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN). Theoretical models based on Blandford & Znajek extract the rotational energy from a Kerr black hole, which could be the case for NGC1052, to launch these jets. This requires magnetic fields of the order of $10^3\,$G to $10^4\,$G. We imaged the vicinity of the SMBH of the AGN NGC1052 with the Global Millimetre VLBI Array and found a bright and compact central feature, smaller than 1.9 light days (100 Schwarzschild radii) in radius. Interpreting this as a blend of the unresolved jet bases, we derive the magnetic field at 1 Schwarzschild radius to lie between 200 G and ~80000 G consistent with Blandford & Znajek models.
  • Using high-resolution radio imaging with VLBI techniques, the TANAMI program has been observing the parsec-scale radio jets of southern (declination south of -30{\deg}) gamma-ray bright AGN simultaneously with Fermi/LAT monitoring of their gamma-ray emission. We present the radio and gamma-ray properties of the TANAMI sources based on one year of contemporaneous TANAMI and Fermi/LAT data. A large fraction (72%) of the TANAMI sample can be associated with bright gamma-ray sources for this time range. Association rates differ for different optical classes with all BL Lacs, 76% of quasars and just 17% of galaxies detected by the LAT. Upper limits were established on the gamma-ray flux from TANAMI sources not detected by LAT. This analysis led to the identification of three new Fermi sources whose detection was later confirmed. The gamma-ray and radio luminosities are related by $L_\gamma \propto L_r^{0.89+-0.04}$. The brightness temperatures of the radio cores increase with the average gamma-ray luminosity, and the presence of brightness temperatures above the inverse Compton limit implies strong Doppler boosting in those sources. The undetected sources have lower gamma/radio luminosity ratios and lower contemporaneous brightness temperatures. Unless the Fermi/LAT-undetected blazars are strongly gamma-ray-fainter than the Fermi/LAT-detected ones, their gamma-ray luminosity should not be significantly lower than the upper limits calculated here.
  • Binary systems with an accreting compact object are a unique chance to investigate the strong, clumpy, line-driven winds of early type supergiants by using the compact object's X-rays to probe the wind structure. We analyze the two-component wind of HDE 226868, the O9.7Iab giant companion of the black hole Cyg X-1 using 4.77 Ms of RXTE observations of the system taken over the course of 16 years. Absorption changes strongly over the 5.6 d binary orbit, but also shows a large scatter at a given orbital phase, especially at superior conjunction. The orbital variability is most prominent when the black hole is in the hard X-ray state. Our data are poorer for the intermediate and soft state, but show signs for orbital variability of the absorption column in the intermediate state. We quantitatively compare the data in the hard state to a toy model of a focussed Castor-Abbott-Klein-wind: as it does not incorporate clumping, the model does not describe the observations well. A qualitative comparison to a simplified simulation of clumpy winds with spherical clumps shows good agreement in the distribution of the equivalent hydrogen column density for models with a porosity length on the order of the stellar radius at inferior conjunction; we conjecture that the deviations between data and model at superior conjunction could be either due to lack of a focussed wind component in the model or a more complicated clump structure.
  • Multiwavelength observations have revealed the highly unusual properties of the gamma-ray source PMN J1603-4904, which are difficult to reconcile with any other well established gamma-ray source class. The object is either a very atypical blazar or compact jet source seen at a larger angle to the line of sight. In order to determine the physical origin of the high-energy emission processes in PMN J1603-4904, we study the X-ray spectrum in detail. We performed quasi-simultaneous X-ray observations with XMM-Newton and Suzaku in 2013 September, resulting in the first high signal-to-noise X-ray spectrum of this source. The 2-10 keV X-ray spectrum can be well described by an absorbed power law with an emission line at 5.44$\pm$0.05 keV (observed frame). Interpreting this feature as a K{\alpha} line from neutral iron, we determine the redshift of PMN J1603-4904 to be z=0.18$\pm$0.01, corresponding to a luminosity distance of 872$\pm$54 Mpc. The detection of a redshifted X-ray emission line further challenges the original BL Lac classification of PMN J1603-4904. This result suggests that the source is observed at a larger angle to the line of sight than expected for blazars, and thus the source would add to the elusive class of gamma-ray loud misaligned-jet objects, possibly a {\gamma}-ray bright young radio galaxy.
  • Centaurus A is the closest radio-loud active galaxy. Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) enables us to study the jet-counterjet system on milliarcsecond (mas) scales, providing essential information for jet emission and propagation models. We study the evolution of the central parsec jet structure of Cen A over 3.5 years. The proper motion analysis of individual jet components allows us to constrain jet formation and propagation and to test the proposed correlation of increased high energy flux with jet ejection events. Cen A is an exceptional laboratory for such detailed study as its proximity translates to unrivaled linear resolution, where 1 mas corresponds to 0.018 pc. The first 7 epochs of high-resolution TANAMI VLBI observations at 8 GHz of Cen A are presented, resolving the jet on (sub-)mas scales. They show a differential motion of the sub-pc scale jet with significantly higher component speeds further downstream where the jet becomes optically thin. We determined apparent component speeds within a range of 0.1c to 0.3c, as well as identified long-term stable features. In combination with the jet-to-counterjet ratio we can constrain the angle to the line of sight to ~12{\deg} to 45{\deg}. The high resolution kinematics are best explained by a spine-sheath structure supported by the downstream acceleration occurring where the jet becomes optically thin. On top of the underlying, continuous flow, TANAMI observations clearly resolve individual jet features. The flow appears to be interrupted by an obstacle causing a local decrease in surface brightness and a circumfluent jet behavior. We propose a jet-star interaction scenario to explain this appearance. The comparison of jet ejection times with high X-ray flux phases yields a partial overlap of the onset of the X-ray emission and increasing jet activity, but the limited data do not support a robust correlation.
  • We present the most extensive analysis of Fourier-based X-ray timing properties of the black hole binary Cygnus X-1 to date, based on 12 years of bi-weekly monitoring with RXTE from 1999 to 2011. Our aim is a comprehensive study of timing behavior across all spectral states, including the elusive transitions and extreme hard and soft states. We discuss the dependence of the timing properties on spectral shape and photon energy, and study correlations between Fourier-frequency dependent coherence and time lags with features in the power spectra. Our main results are: (a) The fractional rms in the 0.125-256 Hz range in different spectral states shows complex behavior that depends on the energy range considered. It reaches its maximum not in the hard state, but in the soft state in the Comptonized tail above 10 keV. (b) The shape of power spectra in hard and intermediate states and the normalization in the soft state are strongly energy dependent in the 2.1-15 keV range. This emphasizes the need for an energy-dependent treatment of power spectra and a careful consideration of energy- and mass-scaling when comparing the variability of different source types, e.g., black hole binaries and AGN. PSDs during extremely hard and extremely soft states can be easily confused for energies above ~5 keV in the 0.125-256 Hz range. (c) The coherence between energy bands drops during transitions from the intermediate into the soft state but recovers in the soft state. (d) The time lag spectra in soft and intermediate states show distinct features at frequencies related to the frequencies of the main variability components seen in the power spectra and show the same shift to higher frequencies as the source softens. [...abridged] In particular, we discuss how the timing properties of Cyg X-1 can be used to assess the evolution of variability with spectral shape in other black hole binaries. [...abridged]
  • We investigate the nature and classification of PMNJ1603-4904, a bright radio source close to the Galactic plane, which is associated with one of the brightest hard-spectrum gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi/LAT. It has previously been classified as a low-peaked BL Lac object based on its broadband emission and the absence of optical emission lines. Optical measurements, however, suffer strongly from extinction and the absence of pronounced short-time gamma-ray variability over years of monitoring is unusual for a blazar. We are combining new and archival multiwavelength data in order to reconsider the classification and nature of this unusual gamma-ray source. For the first time, we study the radio morphology at 8.4GHz and 22.3GHz, and its spectral properties on milliarcsecond (mas) scales, based on VLBI observations from the TANAMI program. We combine the resulting images with multiwavelength data in the radio, IR, optical/UV, X-ray, and gamma-ray regimes. PMNJ1603-4904 shows a symmetric brightness distribution at 8.4GHz on mas-scales, with the brightest, and most compact component in the center of the emission region. The morphology is reminiscent of a Compact Symmetric Object (CSO). Such objects have been predicted to produce gamma-ray emission but have not been detected as a class by Fermi/LAT so far. Sparse (u, v)-coverage at 22.3GHz prevents an unambiguous modeling of the source morphology. IR measurements reveal an excess in the spectral energy distribution (SED), which can be modeled with a blackbody with a temperature of about 1600K, and which is usually not present in blazar SEDs. The VLBI data and the shape of the SED challenge the current blazar classification. PMNJ1603-4904 seems to be either a highly peculiar BL Lac object or a misaligned jet source. In the latter case, the intriguing VLBI structure opens room for a possible classification as a gamma-ray bright CSO.
  • The knowledge of the spectral state of a black hole is essential for the interpretation of data from black holes in terms of their emission models. Based on pointed observations of Cyg X-1 with the Rossi X-ray timing Explorer (RXTE) that are used to classify simultaneous RXTE-ASM observations, we develop a scheme based on RXTE -ASM colors and count rates that can be used to classify all observations of this canonical black hole that were performed between 1996 and 2011. We show that a simple count rate criterion, as used previously, leads to a significantly higher fraction of misclassified observations. This scheme enables us to classify single INTEGRAL-IBIS science windows and to obtain summed spectra for the soft, intermediate and hard state with low contamination by other states.
  • We present a scheme to determine the spectral state of the canonical black hole Cyg X-1 using data from previous and current X-ray all sky monitors (RXTE-ASM, Swift-BAT, MAXI, and Fermi-GBM). State determinations of the hard/intermediate and soft state agree to better than 10% between different monitors, facilitating the determination of the state and its context for any observation of the source, potentially over the lifetimes of different individual monitors. A separation of the hard and the intermediate state, which strongly differ in their spectral shape and short-term timing behavior, is only possible when monitor data in the soft X-rays (<5 keV) are available. A statistical analysis of the states confirms the different activity patterns of the source (e.g., months to years long hard state periods or phases during which numerous transitions occurs). It also shows the hard and soft states to be stable, with the probability of Cyg X-1 remaining in a given state for at least one week to be larger than 85% for the hard state and larger than 75%, for the soft state. Intermediate states are short lived, with a probability of 50% that the source leaves the intermediate state within three days. A reliable detection of these potentially short-lived events is only possible with monitor data with a time resolution of better than 1 d.
  • The Southern Hemisphere VLBI monitoring program TANAMI provides dual-frequency (8 GHz and 22 GHz), milliarcsecond monitoring of extragalactic jets south of -30 degrees declination. The TANAMI sample consists of a combined radio and gamma-ray selected subsample of currently 80 AGN jets, with new gamma-ray bright sources being added upon detections by Fermi/LAT. Supporting programs provide simultaneous multiwavelength coverage of all sources, in order to construct broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of flaring and quiescence source states, as well as a rapid follow-up of high-energy flares. This combined setup allows us to continuously study the spectral and structural evolution of highly energetic extragalactic jets and test correlations in different wavebands, providing crucial information on underlying physical mechanisms. Here, we present jet kinematics of Centaurus A and show preliminary VLBI results on PKS 0625-354 and the time-dependent spectral index image of PKS 0537-441.
  • The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) monitoring program TANAMI provides bi-monthly, dualfrequency (8GHz and 22GHz) observations of extragalactic jets with milliarcsecond resolution south of -30 deg declination using the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and additional radio telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, New Zealand and South Africa. Supporting programs provide multiwavelength coverage of the Fermi/LAT sources of the TANAMI sample, in order to construct simultaneous broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), as well as rapid follow-ups of high energy flares. The main purpose of this project is to study the radio-gamma-ray connection seen in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGN) via simultaneous monitoring of their VLBI structure and broadband emission in order to distinguish between different proposed emission models. Here we give a brief description of the TANAMI program and will then focus on its current status: (1) We present some results on the first simultaneous dual-frequency images of the whole sample resulting in spectral index maps of the parsec-scale core-jet structure. (2) The TANAMI array allows us to observe the closest radio galaxy Centaurus A with unprecedented high angular resolution resulting in the best-ever image of an AGN jet. We constructed the best resolved spectral index map of its jet-counterjet system revealing multiple possible production sites of gamma-rays recently detected by Fermi/LAT. With the first epochs of the TANAMI monitoring, we can study the proper jet motion of individual jet components of Cen A on sub-parsec scales. (3) Since the launch of Fermi/LAT we added newly detected gamma-ray bright AGN to the TANAMI observing list which is built as a combined radio and gamma-ray selected sample. For most of these sources the TANAMI observations obtain the first VLBI images ever made.
  • Centaurus A is the closest active galactic nucleus. High resolution imaging using Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) enables us to study the spectral and kinematic behavior of the radio jet-counterjet system on sub-parsec scales, providing essential information for jet emission and formation models. Our aim is to study the structure and spectral shape of the emission from the central-parsec region of Cen A. As a target of the Southern Hemisphere VLBI monitoring program TANAMI (Tracking Active Galactic Nuclei with Milliarcsecond Interferometry), VLBI observations of Cen A are made regularly at 8.4 and 22.3 GHz with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and associated telescopes in Antarctica, Chile, and South Africa. The first dual-frequency images of this source are presented along with the resulting spectral index map. An angular resolution of 0.4 mas x 0.7 mas is achieved at 8.4 GHz, corresponding to a linear scale of less than 0.013 pc. Hence, we obtain the highest resolution VLBI image of Cen A, comparable to previous space-VLBI observations. By combining with the 22.3 GHz image, which has been taken without contributing transoceanic baselines at somewhat lower resolution, we present the corresponding dual-frequency spectral index distribution along the sub-parsec scale jet revealing the putative emission regions for recently detected gamma-rays from the core region by Fermi/LAT. We resolve the innermost structure of the milliarcsecond scale jet and counterjet system of Cen A into discrete components. The simultaneous observations at two frequencies provide the highest resolved spectral index map of an AGN jet allowing us to identify multiple possible sites as the origin of the high energy emission.
  • At a distance of about 3.8 Mpc, the radio galaxy Centaurus A is the closest active galaxy. Therefore it is a key target for studying the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN). VLBI observations conducted within the framework of the TANAMI program enable us to study the central region of the Cen A jet with some of the highest linear resolutions ever achieved in an AGN. This region is the likely origin of the gamma-ray emission recently detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). TANAMI monitors a sample of radio and gamma-ray selected extragalactic jets south of -30 degrees declination at 8.4 GHz and 22.3 GHz with the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) and the transoceanic antennas Hartebeesthoek in South Africa, the 6 m Transportable Integrated Geodetic Observatory (TIGO) in Chile and the 9 m German Antarctic Receiving Station (GARS) in O'Higgins, Antarctica. The highest angular resolution achieved at 8.4 GHz in the case of Cen A is 0.59mas x 0.978mas (natural weighting) corresponding to a linear scale of less than 18 milliparsec. We show images of the first three TANAMI 8.4 GHz observation epochs of the sub-parsec scale jet-counterjet system of Cen A. With a simultaneous 22.3 GHz observation in 2008 November, we present a high resolution spectral index map of the inner few milliarcseconds of the jet probing the putative emission region of gamma-ray-photons.
  • The TANAMI (Tracking AGN with Austral Milliarcsecond Interferometry) and associated programs provide comprehensive radio monitoring of extragalactic gamma-ray sources south of declination -30 degrees. Joint quasi-simultaneous observations between the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and ground based observatories allow us to discriminate between competing theoretical blazar emission models. High resolution VLBI observations are the only way to spatially resolve the sub-parsec level emission regions where the high-energy radiation originates. The gap from radio to gamma-ray energies is spanned with near simultaneous data from the Swift satellite and ground based optical observatories. We present early results from the TANAMI program in the context of this panchromatic suite of observations.
  • We investigate non-perturbative features of a three-dimensional Abelian Higgs model with singly- and doubly-charged scalar fields coupled to a single compact Abelian gauge field. The model is pretending to describe various planar systems of strongly correlated electrons such as high-Tc superconductivity in the overdoped regime and exotic materials possessing excitations with fractionalized quantum numbers. The complicated phase structure of the model is studied thoroughly using numerical tools and analytical arguments. In the three-dimensional space of coupling parameters we identify the Fermi liquid, the spin gap, the superconductor and the strange metallic phases. The behavior of three kinds of topological defects -- holon and spinon vortices and monopoles - is explored in various phases. We also observe a new effect, the strong enhancement of the phase transition strength reflected in a lower order of the transition: at sufficiently strong gauge coupling the two second order phase transitions -- corresponding to spinon-pair and holon condensation lines - join partially in the phase diagram and become a first order phase transition in that region. The last observation may have an analogue in Quantum Chromodynamics at non-zero temperature and finite baryon density. We argue that at sufficiently large baryon density the finite-temperature transition between the (3-flavor paired) color superconducting phase and the quark-gluon plasma phases should be much stronger compared with the transition between 2-flavor paired and 3-flavor paired superconducting phases.