• Ground-based optical microlensing surveys have provided tantalising, if inconclusive, evidence for a significant population of free-floating planets (FFPs). Both ground and space-based facilities are being used and developed which will be able to probe the distrubution of FFPs with much better sensitivity. It is vital also to develop a high-precision microlensing simulation framework to evaluate the completeness of such surveys. We present the first signal-to-noise limited calculations of the FFP microlensing rate using the Besancon Galactic model. The microlensing distribution towards the Galactic centre is simulated for wide-area ground-based optical surveys such as OGLE or MOA, a wide-area ground-based near-IR survey, and a targeted space-based near-IR survey which could be undertaken with Euclid or WFIRST. We present a calculation framework for the computation of the optical and near-infrared microlensing rate and optical depth for simulated stellar catalogues which are signal-to-noise limited, and take account of extinction, unresolved stellar background light and finite source size effects, which can be significant for FFPs. We find that the global ground-based I-band yield over a central 200 deg^2 region covering the Galactic centre ranges from 20 Earth-mass FFPs year^-1 up to 3,500 year^-1 for Jupiter FFPs in the limit of 100% detection efficiency, and almost an order of magnitude larger for a K-band survey. For ground-based surveys we find that the inclusion of finite source and the unresolved background reveals a mass-dependent variation in the spatial distribution of FFPs. For a space-based H-band covering 2 deg^2, the yield depends on the target field but maximizes close to the Galactic centre with around 76 Earth through to 1,700 Jupiter FFPs year^-1. For near-IR space-based surveys the spatial distribution of FFPs is found to be largely insensitive to the FFP mass scale.
  • Generalized Standard Materials are governed by maximal cyclically monotone operators and modeled by convex potentials. G\'ery de Saxc\'e's Implicit Standard Materials are modeled by biconvex bipotentials. We analyze the intermediate class of n-monotone materials governed by maximal n-monotone operators and modeled by Fitzpatrick's functions. Revisiting the model of elastic materials initiated by Robert Hooke, and insisting on the linearity, coaxiality and monotonicity properties of the constitutive law, we illustrate that Fitzpatrick's representation of n-monotone operators coming from convex analysis provides a constructive method to discover the best bipotential modeling a n-monotone material. Giving up the symmetry of the linear constitutive laws, we find out that n-monotonicity is a relevant criterion for the materials characterization and classification.