• We compare theoretical results for electron spin resonance (ESR) properties of the Heisenberg-Ising Hamiltonian with ESR experiments on the quasi-one-dimensional magnet Cu(py)$_2$Br$_2$ (CPB). Our measurements were performed over a wide frequency and temperature range giving insight into spin dynamics, spin structure, and magnetic anisotropy of this compound. By analyzing the angular dependence of ESR parameters (resonance shift and linewidth) at room temperature we show that the two weakly coupled inequivalent spin chain types inside the compound are well described by Heisenberg-Ising chains with their magnetic anisotropy axes perpendicular to the chain direction and almost perpendicular to each other. We further determine the full $g$-tensor from these data. In addition, the angular dependence of the linewidth at high temperatures gives us access to the exponent of the algebraic decay of a dynamical correlation function of the isotropic Heisenberg chain. From the temperature dependence of static susceptibilities we extract the strength of the exchange coupling ($J/k_B = 52.0\,\text{K}$) and the anisotropy parameter ($\delta\approx -0.02$) of the model Hamiltonian. An independent compatible value of $\delta$ is obtained by comparing the exact prediction for the resonance shift at low temperatures with high-frequency ESR data recorded at $4\,\text{K}$. The spin structure in the ordered state implied by the two (almost) perpendicular anisotropy axes is in accordance with the propagation vector determined from neutron scattering experiments. In addition to undoped samples we study the impact of partial substitution of Br by Cl ions on spin dynamics. From the dependence of the ESR linewidth on doping level we infer an effective decoupling of the anisotropic component $J\delta$ from the isotropic exchange $J$ in these systems.
  • Exotic quantum states and fractionalized magnetic excitations, such as spinons in one-dimensional chains, are generally viewed as belonging to the domain of 3d transition metal systems with spins 1/2. Our neutron scattering experiments on the 4f-electron metal Yb$_2$Pt$_2$Pb overturn this common wisdom. We observe broad magnetic continuum dispersing in only one direction, which indicates that the underlying elementary excitations are spinons carrying fractional spin-1/2. These spinons are the quantum dynamics of the anisotropic, orbital-dominated Yb moments, and thus these effective quantum spins are emergent variables that encode the electronic orbitals. The unique birthmark of their unusual origin is that only longitudinal spin fluctuations are measurable, while the transverse excitations such as spin waves are virtually invisible to magnetic neutron scattering. The proliferation of these orbital-spinons strips the electrons of their orbital identity, and we thus report here a new electron fractionalization phenomenon, charge-orbital separation.
  • We analyze the absorption of microwaves by the Heisenberg-Ising chain combining exact calculations, based on the integrability of the model, with numerical calculations. Within linear response theory the absorbed intensity is determined by the imaginary part of the dynamical susceptibility. The moments of the normalized intensity can be used to define the shift of the resonance frequency induced by the interactions and the line width independently of the shape of the spectral line. These moments can be calculated exactly as functions of temperature and strength of an external magnetic field, as long as the field is directed along the symmetry axis of the chain. This allows us to discuss the line width and the resonance shift for a given magnetic field in the full range of possible anisotropy parameters. For the interpretation of these data we need a qualitative knowledge of the line shape which we obtain from fully numerical calculations for finite chains. Exact analytical results on the line shape are out of reach of current theories. From our numerical work we could extract, however, an empirical parameter-free model of the line shape at high temperatures which is extremely accurate over a wide range of anisotropy parameters and is exact at the free fermion point and at the isotropic point. Another prediction of the line shape can be made in the zero-temperature and zero magnetic field limit, where the sufficiently anisotropic model shows strong absorption. For anisotropy parameters in the massive phase we derive the exact two-spinon contribution to the spectral line. From the intensity sum rule it can be estimated that this contribution accounts for more than 80% of the spectral weight if the anisotropy parameter is moderately above its value at the isotropic point.