• We present the largest and most spatially extended planetary nebulae (PNe) catalog ever obtained for the Fornax cluster. We measured velocities of 1452 PNe out to 200 kpc in the cluster core using a counter-dispersed slitless spectroscopic technique with data from FORS2 on the VLT. With such extended spatial coverage, we can study separately the stellar halos of some of the cluster main galaxies and the intracluster light. In this second paper of the Fornax Cluster VLT Spectroscopic Survey (FVSS), we identify and classify the emission-line sources, describe the method to select PNe and calculate their coordinates and velocities from the dispersed slitless images. From the PN 2D velocity map we identify stellar streams that are possibly tracing the gravitational interaction of NGC1399 with NGC1404 and NGC1387. We also present the velocity dispersion profile out to $\sim 200$ kpc radii, which shows signatures of a superposition of the bright central galaxy and the cluster potential, with the latter clearly dominating the regions outside R $\sim 1000$" ($\sim 100$ kpc).
  • In the core of the Fornax cluster, on the West side of NGC1399, we have detected a previously unknown region of intra-cluster light (ICL). It is made up by several faint ($\mu_r \simeq 28 - 29$~mag/arcsec$^2$) {\it patches} of diffuse light. The bulk of the ICL is located in between the three bright galaxies in the core, NGC1387, NGC1379 and NGC1381, at $10\leq R \leq40$~arcmin ($\sim 58 - 230$~kpc) from the central galaxy NGC~1399. We show that the ICL is the counterpart in the diffuse light of the known over-density in the population of blue globular clusters (GCs). The total g-band luminosity of the ICL is $L_g\simeq 8.3 \times 10^{9}$ $L_{\odot}$, which is $\sim5\%$ of the total luminosity of NGC1399. This is consistent with the fraction of the blue GCs in the same region of the cluster. The ICL has $g-r \sim 0.7$~mag, which is similar to the colors in the halo of the bright galaxies in the cluster core. The new findings were compared with theoretical predictions for the ICL formation and they support a scenario in which the intra-cluster population detected in the core of the Fornax cluster is build up by the tidal stripping of material (stars and GCs) from galaxy outskirts in a close passage with the cD. Moreover, the diffuse form of the ICL and its location close to the core of the cluster is expected in a dynamically evolved cluster as Fornax.
  • Studies of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in nearby clusters have revealed a sub-population of extremely diffuse galaxies with central surface brightness $\mu_{0,g'}$ > 24 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ and effective radius between 1.5 kpc < R$_{e}$ < 10 kpc. The origin of these Ultra Diffuse Galaxies (UDGs) is still unclear, although several theories have been suggested. We exploit the deep g', r' and i'-band images of the Fornax Deep Survey (FDS), in order to identify LSB galaxies in the center of the Fornax cluster. We identified visually all extended structures having r'-band central surface brightness of $\mu_{0,r'}$ > 23 mag arcsec$^{-2}$. We classified the objects based on their appearance and performed 2D S\'ersic model fitting with GALFIT. We analyzed their distribution and orientations in the cluster, and studied their colors and compared the LSB galaxies in Fornax with those in other environments. Our sample consists of 205 galaxies of which 196 are LSB dwarfs (with R$_e$ < 1.5kpc) and nine are UDGs (R$_e$ > 1.5 kpc). We show that the UDGs have g'-r' colors similar to those of LSB dwarfs. The largest UDGs in our sample appear different from the other LSB galaxies, in that they are significantly more elongated and extended, whereas the smaller UDGs differ from the LSB dwarfs only by their effective radii. We do not find clear differences between the structural parameters of the UDGs in our sample and those of UDGs in other galaxy environments. We find that the dwarf LSB galaxies in our sample are less concentrated in the cluster center than the galaxies with higher surface brightness, and that their number density drops in the core of the cluster. Our findings are consistent with the small UDGs forming the tail of a continuous distribution of less extended LSB galaxies. However, the elongated and distorted shapes of the large UDGs could imply that they are tidally disturbed galaxies.
  • Observations of diffuse starlight in the outskirts of galaxies are thought to be a fundamental source of constraints on the cosmological context of galaxy assembly in the $\Lambda$CDM model. Such observations are not trivial because of the extreme faintness of such regions. In this work, we investigate the photometric properties of six massive early type galaxies (ETGs) in the VEGAS sample (NGC 1399, NGC 3923, NGC 4365, NGC 4472, NGC 5044, and NGC 5846) out to extremely low surface brightness levels, with the goal of characterizing the global structure of their light profiles for comparison to state-of-the-art galaxy formation models. We carry out deep and detailed photometric mapping of our ETG sample taking advantage of deep imaging with VST/OmegaCAM in the g and i bands. By fitting the light profiles, and comparing the results to simulations of elliptical galaxy assembly, we identify signatures of a transition between "relaxed" and "unrelaxed" accreted components and can constrain the balance between in situ and accreted stars. The very good agreement of our results with predictions from theoretical simulations demonstrates that the full VEGAS sample of $\sim 100$ ETGs will allow us to use the distribution of diffuse light as a robust statistical probe of the hierarchical assembly of massive galaxies.
  • As part of the Fornax Deep Survey with the ESO VLT Survey Telescope, we present new $g$ and $r$ bands mosaics of the SW group of the Fornax cluster. It covers an area of $3 \times 2$ square degrees around the central galaxy NGC1316. The deep photometry, the high spatial resolution of OmegaCam and the large covered area allow us to study the galaxy structure, to trace stellar halo formation and look at the galaxy environment. We map the surface brightness profile out to 33arcmin ($\sim 200$kpc $\sim15R_e$) from the galaxy centre, down to $\mu_g \sim 31$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$ and $\mu_r \sim 29$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$. This allow us to estimate the scales of the main components dominating the light distribution, which are the central spheroid, inside 5.5 arcmin ($\sim33$ kpc), and the outer stellar envelope. Data analysis suggests that we are catching in act the second phase of the mass assembly in this galaxy, since the accretion of smaller satellites is going on in both components. The outer envelope of NGC1316 still hosts the remnants of the accreted satellite galaxies that are forming the stellar halo. We discuss the possible formation scenarios for NGC1316, by comparing the observed properties (morphology, colors, gas content, kinematics and dynamics) with predictions from cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. We find that {\it i)} the central spheroid could result from at least one merging event, it could be a pre-existing early-type disk galaxy with a lower mass companion, and {\it ii)} the stellar envelope comes from the gradual accretion of small satellites.
  • We explore the variation in single star 15-30 $\rm{M}_{\odot}$, non-rotating, solar metallicity, pre-supernova MESA models due to changes in the number of isotopes in a fully-coupled nuclear reaction network and adjustments in the mass resolution. Within this two-dimensional plane we quantitatively detail the range of core masses at various stages of evolution, mass locations of the main nuclear burning shells, electron fraction profiles, mass fraction profiles, burning lifetimes, stellar lifetimes, and compactness parameter at core-collapse for models with and without mass loss. Up to carbon burning we generally find mass resolution has a larger impact on the variations than the number of isotopes, while the number of isotopes plays a more significant role in determining the span of the variations for neon, oxygen and silicon burning. Choice of mass resolution dominates the variations in the structure of the intermediate convection zone and secondary convection zone during core and shell hydrogen burning respectively, where we find a minimum mass resolution of $\approx$ 0.01 $\rm{M}_{\odot}$ is necessary to achieve convergence in the helium core mass at the $\approx$5% level. On the other hand, at the onset of core-collapse we find $\approx$30% variations in the central electron fraction and mass locations of the main nuclear burning shells, a minimum of $\approx$127 isotopes is needed to attain convergence of these values at the $\approx$10% level.
  • Deep observations of the dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy NGC 1396 (M$_V = -16.60$, Mass $\sim 4\times10^8$ M$_\odot$), located in the Fornax cluster, have been performed with the VLT/ MUSE spectrograph in the wavelength region from $4750-9350$ \AA{}. In this paper we present a stellar population analysis studying chemical abundances, the star formation history (SFH) and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as a function of galacto-centric distance. Different, independent ways to analyse the stellar populations result in a luminosity-weighted age of $\sim$ 6 Gyr and a metallicity [Fe/H]$\sim$ $-0.4$, similar to other dEs of similar mass. We find unusually overabundant values of [Ca/Fe] $\sim +0.1$, and under-abundant Sodium, with [Na/Fe] values around $-0.1$, while [Mg/Fe] is overabundant at all radii, increasing from $\sim+0.1$ in the centre to $\sim +0.2$ dex. We notice a significant metallicity and age gradient within this dwarf galaxy. To constrain the stellar IMF of NGC 1396, we find that the IMF of NGC 1396 is consistent with either a Kroupa-like or a top-heavy distribution, while a bottom-heavy IMF is firmly ruled out. An analysis of the abundance ratios, and a comparison with galaxies in the Local Group, shows that the chemical enrichment history of NGC 1396 is similar to the Galactic disc, with an extended star formation history. This would be the case if the galaxy originated from a LMC-sized dwarf galaxy progenitor, which would lose its gas while falling into the Fornax cluster.
  • We report the discovery of a complex extended density enhancement in the Globular Clusters (GCs) in the central $\sim 0.5(^{\circ})^2$ ($\sim 0.06$ Mpc$^2$) of the Fornax cluster, corresponding to $\sim 50\%$ of the area within 1 core radius. This overdensity connects the GC system of NGC1399 to most of those of neighboring galaxies within $\sim 0.6^{\circ}$ ($\sim 210$ kpc) along the W-E direction. The asymmetric density structure suggests that the galaxies in the core of the Fornax cluster experienced a lively history of interactions that have left a clear imprint on the spatial distribution of GCs. The extended central dominant structure is more prominent in the distribution of blue GCs, while red GCs show density enhancements that are more centrally concentrated on the host galaxies. We propose that the relatively small-scale density structures in the red GCs are caused by galaxy-galaxy interactions, while the extensive spatial distribution of blue GCs is due to stripping of GCs from the halos of core massive galaxies by the Fornax gravitational potential. Our investigations is based on density maps of candidate GCs extracted from the multi-band VLT Survey Telescope (VST) survey of Fornax (FDS), identified in a three-dimensional color space and further selected based on their $g$-band magnitude and morphology.
  • The asteroseismology of red giant stars has continued to yield surprises since the onset of high-precision photometry from space-based observations. An exciting new theoretical result shows that the previously observed suppression of dipole oscillation modes in red giants can be used to detect strong magnetic fields in the stellar cores. A fundamental facet of the theory is that nearly all the mode energy leaking into the core is trapped by the magnetic greenhouse effect. This results in clear predictions for how the mode visibility changes as a star evolves up the red giant branch, and how that depends on stellar mass, spherical degree, and mode lifetime. Here, we investigate the validity of these predictions with a focus on the visibility of different spherical degrees. We find that mode suppression weakens for higher degree modes with an average reduction in the quadrupole mode visibility of up to 49% for the least evolved stars in our sample, and no detectable suppression of octupole modes, in agreement with the theoretical predictions. We furthermore find evidence for the influence of increasing mode lifetimes on the measured visibilities along the red giant branch, in agreement with previous independent observations. These results support the theory that strong internal magnetic fields are responsible for the observed suppression of non-radial modes in red giants. We also find preliminary evidence that stars with suppressed dipole modes on average have slightly lower metallicity than normal stars.
  • [Abrigded] We have started a new deep, multi-imaging survey of the Fornax cluster, dubbed Fornax Deep Survey (FDS), at the VLT Survey Telescope. In this paper we present the deep photometry inside two square degrees around the bright galaxy NGC1399 in the core of the cluster. We found a very extended and diffuse envelope surrounding the luminous galaxy NGC1399: we map the surface brightness out to 33 arcmin (~ 192 kpc) from the galaxy center and down to about 31 mag/arcsec^2 in the g band. The deep photometry allows us to detect a faint stellar bridge in the intracluster region between NGC1399 and NGC1387. By analyzing the integrated colors of this feature, we argue that it could be due to the ongoing interaction between the two galaxies, where the outer envelope of NGC1387 on its east side is stripped away. By fitting the light profile, we found that it exists a physical break radius in the total light distribution at R=10 arcmin (~58 kpc) that sets the transition region between the bright central galaxy and the outer exponential stellar halo. We discuss the main implications of this work on the build-up of the stellar halo at the center of the Fornax cluster. By comparing with the numerical simulations of the stellar halo formation for the most massive BCGs, we find that the observed stellar halo mass fraction is consistent with a halo formed through the multiple accretion of progenitors with a stellar mass in the range 10^8 - 10^11 M_sun. This might suggest that the halo of NGC1399 has also gone through a major merging event. The absence of a significant number of luminous stellar streams and tidal tails out to 192 kpc suggests that the epoch of this strong interaction goes back to an early formation epoch. Therefore, differently from the Virgo cluster, the extended stellar halo around NGC1399 is characterised by a more diffuse and well-mixed component, including the ICL.
  • We present multi-wavelength observations of SN2014C during the first 500 days. These observations represent the first solid detection of a young extragalactic stripped-envelope SN out to high-energy X-rays. SN2014C was the explosion of an H-stripped progenitor star with ordinary explosion parameters. However, over the time scale of ~1yr, SN2014C experienced a complete metamorphosis and evolved from an ordinary H-poor supernova of type Ib into a strongly interacting, H-rich supernova of type IIn. Signatures of the SN shock interacting with a dense medium are observed across the spectrum. Coordinated observations with Swift, Chandra and NuSTAR have captured the evolution in detail and revealed the presence of a massive shell of ~1 Msun of hydrogen-rich material at ~6d16 cm from the explosion site. We estimate that the shell was ejected by the progenitor star in the decades to centuries before core collapse. This result poses significant challenges to current theories of massive star evolution, as it requires a physical mechanism responsible for the ejection of the deepest hydrogen layer of H-poor SN progenitors synchronized with the onset of stellar collapse. Theoretical investigations point at binary interactions and/or instabilities during the last stages of nuclear burning in massive stars as potential triggers of the time-dependent mass loss. We constrain these scenarios utilizing the sample of 183 SNe Ib/c with public radio observations. Our analysis identifies SN2014C-like signatures in ~10% of SNe with constraining radio data. This fraction is somewhat larger but reasonably consistent with the expectation from the theory of recent envelope ejection due to binary evolution IF the ejected material can survive in the close environment for 1000-10000 yrs. Alternatively, nuclear burning instabilities extending all the way to the core C-burning phase might also play a critical role.
  • Magnetic fields play a role in almost all stages of stellar evolution. Most low-mass stars, including the Sun, show surface fields that are generated by dynamo processes in their convective envelopes. Intermediate-mass stars do not have deep convective envelopes, although 10% exhibit strong surface fields that are presumed to be residuals from the stellar formation process. These stars do have convective cores that might produce internal magnetic fields, and these might even survive into later stages of stellar evolution, but information has been limited by our inability to measure the fields below the stellar surface. Here we use asteroseismology to study the occurrence of strong magnetic fields in the cores of low- and intermediate-mass stars. We have measured the strength of dipolar oscillation modes, which can be suppressed by a strong magnetic field in the core, in over 3600 red giant stars observed by Kepler. About 20% of our sample show mode suppression but this fraction is a strong function of mass. Strong core fields only occur in red giants above 1.1 solar masses (1.1Msun), and the occurrence rate is at least 60% for intermediate-mass stars (1.6--2.0Msun), indicating that powerful dynamos were very common in the convective cores of these stars.
  • The contact phase expected to precede the coalescence of two massive stars is poorly characterized due to the paucity of observational constraints. Here we report on the discovery of VFTS 352, an O-type binary in the 30 Doradus region, as the most massive and earliest spectral type overcontact system known to date. We derived the 3D geometry of the system, its orbital period $P_{\rm orb}=1.1241452(4)$ d, components' effective temperatures -- $T_1=42\,540\pm280$ K and $T_2=41\,120\pm290$ K -- and dynamical masses -- $M_1=28.63\pm0.30 M_{\odot}$ and $M_2 = 28.85\pm0.30 M_{\odot}$. Compared to single-star evolutionary models, the VFTS 352 components are too hot for their dynamical masses by about 2700 and 1100 K, respectively. These results can be explained naturally as a result of enhanced mixing, theoretically predicted to occur in very short-period tidally-locked systems. The VFTS 352 components are two of the best candidates identified so far to undergo this so-called chemically homogeneous evolution. The future of VFTS 352 is uncertain. If the two stars merge, a very rapidly rotating star will be produced. Instead, if the stars continue to evolve homogeneously and keep shrinking within their Roche Lobes, coalescence can be avoided. In this case, tides may counteract the spin down by winds such that the VFTS 352 components may, at the end of their life, fulfill the requirements for long gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors in the collapsar scenario. Independently of whether the VFTS 352 components become GRB progenitors, this scenario makes VFTS 352 interesting as a progenitor of a black hole binary, hence as a potential gravitational wave source through black hole-black hole merger.
  • We present the first deep photometry of a good candidate for a forming polar ring galaxy at redshift z~0.05. This object, named FCSS J033710.0-354727, is a background galaxy in the VST deep field of the Fornax cluster. The deep exposures combined with the high angular resolution of the OmegaCAM at VST allow us to carry out the first detailed photometric analysis for this system in the g and i bands to derive the galaxy structure and colors. Results show that the central object resembles a disk galaxy, surrounded by a ring-like structure 2 times more extended than the central disk. The warped geometry and the presence of bright knots observed along the polar direction, as well as the several debris detected on the NW side with colors comparable to those of the galaxy, suggest that the polar structure is still forming. We argue that the wide polar ring/disk is the result of the ongoing disruption of a companion galaxy in the potential of the central object, which is 2-3 times more massive than the accreting galaxy.
  • Hercules is the prototype of the ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies. To date, there are still no firm constraints on its total luminosity, due to the difficulty of disentangling Hercules bona-fide stars from the severe Galactic field contamination. In order to better constrain Hercules properties we aim at removing foreground and background contaminants in the galaxy field using the proper motions of the Milky Way stars and the colour-colour diagram. We have obtained images of Hercules in the rSloan, BBessel and Uspec bands with the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) and LBC-BIN mode capabilities. The rSloan new data-set combined with data from the LBT archive span a time baseline of about 5 yr, allowing us to measure for the first time proper motions of stars in the Hercules direction. The Uspec data along with existing LBT photometry allowed us to use colour-colour diagram to further remove the field contamination. Thanks to a highly-accurate procedure to derive the rSloan-filter geometric distortion solution for the LBC-red, we were able to measure stellar relative proper motions to a precision of better than 5 mas yr^-1 down to rSloan=22 mag and disentangle a significant fraction (\>90\%) of Milky Way contaminants. We ended up with a sample of 528 sources distributed over a large portion of the galaxy body (0.12 deg^2). Of these sources, 171 turned out to be background galaxies and additional foreground stars, from the analysis of the Uspec - BBessel vs. BBessel - rSloan colour-colour diagram. This leaves us with a sample of 357 likely members of the Hercules UFD. We compared the cleaned colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) with evolutionary models and synthetic CMDs, confirming the presence in Hercules of an old population (t=12\pm 2 Gyr), with a wide spread in metallicity (-3.3\<[Fe/H]\<-1.8).
  • STREGA (STRucture and Evolution of the GAlaxy) is a Guaranteed Time survey being performed at the VST (the ESO VLT Survey Telescope) to map about 150 square degrees in the Galactic halo, in order to constrain the mechanisms of galactic formation and evolution. The survey is built as a five-year project, organized in two parts: a core program to explore the surrounding regions of selected stellar systems and a second complementary part to map the southern portion of the Fornax orbit and extend the observations of the core program. The adopted stellar tracers are mainly variable stars (RR~Lyraes and Long Period Variables) and Main Sequence Turn-off stars for which observations in the g,r,i bands are obtained. We present an overview of the survey and some preliminary results for three observing runs that have been completed. For the region centered on $\omega$~Cen (37 deg^2), covering about three tidal radii, we also discuss the detected stellar density radial profile and angular distribution, leading to the identification of extratidal cluster stars. We also conclude that the cluster tidal radius is about 1.2 deg, in agreement with values in the literature based on the Wilson model.
  • STEP (the SMC in Time: Evolution of a Prototype interacting late-type dwarf galaxy) is a Guaranteed Time Observation survey being performed at the VST (the ESO VLT Survey Telescope). STEP will image an area of 74 deg$^2$ covering the main body of the Small Magellanic Cloud (32 deg$^2$), the Bridge that connects it to the Large Magellanic Cloud (30 deg$^2$) and a small part of the Magellanic Stream (2 deg$^2$). Our $g,r,i,H_{\alpha}$ photometry is able to resolve individual stars down to magnitudes well below the main-sequence turnoff of the oldest populations. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products of the survey. We also present preliminary results for the first two fields for which data acquisition is completed, including some detailed analysis of the two stellar clusters IC\,1624 and NGC\,419.
  • We present HST/STIS time-series spectroscopy of the central star of the "Cat's Eye" planetary nebula NGC 6543. Intensive monitoring of the UV lines over a 5.8 hour period reveals well defined details of large-scale structure in the fast wind, which are exploited to provide new constraints on the rotation rate of the central star. We derive characteristics of the line profile variability that support a physical origin due to co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) that are rooted at the stellar surface. The recurrence time of the observed spectral signatures of the CIRs is used to estimate the rotation period of the central star and, adopting a radius between 0.3 and 0.6 \Rsun constrains the rotational velocity to the range 54 \leq v_{rot} \leq 108 \kms. The implications of these results for single star evolution are discussed based on models calculated here for low-mass stars. Our models predict a sub-surface convective layer in NGC 6543 which we argue to be causally connected to the occurrence of structure in the fast wind.
  • Whether massive stars can occasionally form in relative isolation or if they require a large cluster of lower-mass stars around them is a key test in the differentiation of star formation theories as well as how the initial mass function of stars is sampled. Previous attempts to find O-type stars that formed in isolation were hindered by the possibility that such stars are merely runaways from clusters, i.e., their current isolation does not reflect their birth conditions. We introduce a new method to find O-type stars that are not affected by such a degeneracy. Using the VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey and additional high resolution imaging we have identified stars that satisfy the following constraints: 1) they are O-type stars that are not detected to be part of a binary system based on RV time series analysis; 2) they are designated spectral type O7 or earlier ; 3) their velocities are within 1\sigma of the mean of OB-type stars in the 30 Doradus region, i.e. they are not runaways along our line-of-sight; 4) the projected surface density of stars does not increase within 3 pc towards the O-star (no evidence for clusters); 5) their sight lines are associated with gaseous and/or dusty filaments in the ISM, and 6) if a second candidate is found in the direction of the same filament with which the target is associated, both are required to have similar velocities. With these criteria, we have identified 15 stars in the 30 Doradus region, which are strong candidates for being high-mass stars that have formed in isolation. Additionally, we employed extensive MC stellar cluster simulations to confirm that our results rule out the presence of clusters around the candidates. Eleven of these are classified as Vz stars, possibly associated with the zero-age main sequence. We include a newly discovered W-R star as a candidate, although it does not meet all of the above criteria.
  • The interpretation that bimodal colour distributions of globular clusters (GCs) reflect bimodal metallicity distributions has been challenged. Non-linearities in the colour to metallicity conversions caused by the horizontal branch (HB) stars may be responsible for transforming a unimodal metallicity distribution into a bimodal (optical) colour distribution. We study optical/near-infrared (NIR) colour distributions of the GC systems in 14 E/S0 galaxies. We test whether the bimodal feature, generally present in optical colour distributions, remains in the optical/NIR ones. The latter colour combination is a better metallicity proxy than the former. We use KMM and GMM tests to quantify the probability that different colour distributions are better described by a bimodal, as opposed to a unimodal distribution. We find that double-peaked colour distributions are more commonly seen in optical than in optical/NIR colours. For some of the galaxies where the optical (g-z) distribution is clearly bimodal, the (g-K) and (z-K) distributions are better described by a unimodal distribution. The two most cluster-rich galaxies in our sample, NGC4486 and NGC4649, show some interesting differences. The (g-K) distribution of NGC4649 is better described by a bimodal distribution, while this is true for the (g-K) distribution of NGC4486 GCs only if restricted to a brighter sub-sample with small K-band errors (< 0.05 mag). Formally, the K-band photometric errors cannot be responsible for blurring bimodal metallicity distributions to unimodal (g-K) colour distributions. However, simulations including the extra scatter in the colour-colour diagrams (not fully accounted for in the photometric errors) show that such scatter may contribute to the disappearance of bimodality in (g-K) for the full NGC4486 sample. For the less cluster-rich galaxies results are inconclusive due to poorer statistics. [Abridged]
  • We present a spectroscopic analysis of an extremely rapidly rotating late O-type star, VFTS102, observed during a spectroscopic survey of 30 Doradus. VFTS102 has a projected rotational velocity larger than 500\kms\ and probably as large as 600\kms; as such it would appear to be the most rapidly rotating massive star currently identified. Its radial velocity differs by 40\kms\ from the mean for 30 Doradus, suggesting that it is a runaway. VFTS102 lies 12 pcs from the X-ray pulsar PSR J0537-6910 in the tail of its X-ray diffuse emission. We suggest that these objects originated from a binary system with the rotational and radial velocities of VFTS102 resulting from mass transfer from the progenitor of PSR J0537-691 and the supernova explosion respectively.
  • The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey (VFTS) is an ESO Large Programme that has obtained multi-epoch optical spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Doradus region of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Here we introduce our scientific motivations and give an overview of the survey targets, including optical and near-infrared photometry and comprehensive details of the data reduction. One of the principal objectives was to detect massive binary systems via variations in their radial velocities, thus shaping the multi-epoch observing strategy. Spectral classifications are given for the massive emission-line stars observed by the survey, including the discovery of a new Wolf-Rayet star (VFTS 682, classified as WN5h), 2' to the northeast of R136. To illustrate the diversity of objects encompassed by the survey, we investigate the spectral properties of sixteen targets identified by Gruendl & Chu from Spitzer photometry as candidate young stellar objects or stars with notable mid-infrared excesses. Detailed spectral classification and quantitative analysis of the O- and B-type stars in the VFTS sample, paying particular attention to the effects of rotational mixing and binarity, will be presented in a series of future articles to address fundamental questions in both stellar and cluster evolution.
  • The Tarantula survey is an ESO Large Programme which has obtained multi-epochs spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Dor region in the Large Magelanic Cloud. Here we briefly describe the main drivers of the survey and the observational material derived.
  • Rotation can have severe consequences for the evolution of massive stars. It is now considered as one of the main parameters, alongside mass and metallicity that determine the final fate of single stars. In massive, fast rotating stars mixing processes induced by rotation may be so efficient that helium produced in the center is mixed throughout the envelope. Such stars evolve almost chemically homogeneously. At low metallicity they remain blue and compact, while they gradually evolve into Wolf-Rayet stars and possibly into progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts. In binaries this type of evolution may occur because of (I) tides in very close binaries, as a result of (II) spin up by mass transfer, as result of (III) a merger of the two stars and (IV) when one of the components in the binary was born with a very high initial rotation rate. As these stars stay compact, the evolutionary channels are very different from what classical binary evolutionary models predict. In this contribution we discuss examples of nearly chemically homogeneous evolution in very close tidally-locked binaries. Even in such very close massive binaries, the stars may remain compact and avoid mass transfer, while Roche lobe overflow and a merger would be inevitable in the classical picture. This type of evolution may provide an alternative path to form tight Wolf-Rayet binaries and massive black hole binaries.
  • We highlight the role of the light elements (Li, Be, B) in the evolution of massive single and binary stars, which is largely restricted to a diagnostic value, and foremost so for the element boron. However, we show that the boron surface abundance in massive early type stars contains key information about their foregoing evolution which is not obtainable otherwise. In particular, it allows to constrain internal mixing processes and potential previous mass transfer event for binary stars (even if the companion has disappeared). It may also help solving the mystery of the slowly rotating nitrogen-rich massive main sequence stars.