• We present high-precision spectro-polarimetric data with high spatial resolution (0.4$''$) of the very quiet Sun at 1.56$\mu$m obtained with the GREGOR telescope to shed some light on this complex magnetism. Half of our observed quiet-Sun region is better explained by magnetic substructure within the resolution element. However, we cannot distinguish whether this substructure comes from gradients of the physical parameters along the line of sight or from horizontal gradients (across the surface). In these pixels, a model with two magnetic components is preferred, and we find two distinct magnetic field populations. The population with the larger filling factor has very weak ($\sim$150 G) horizontal fields similar to those obtained in previous works. We demonstrate that the field vector of this population is not constrained by the observations, given the spatial resolution and polarimetric accuracy of our data. The topology of the other component with the smaller filling factor is constrained by the observations for field strengths above 250 G: we infer hG fields with inclinations and azimuth values compatible with an isotropic distribution. The filling factors are typically below 30\%. We also find that the flux of the two polarities is not balanced. From the other half of the observed quiet-Sun area $\sim$50\% are two-lobed Stokes $V$ profiles, meaning that 23\% of the field of view can be adequately explained with a single constant magnetic field embedded in a non-magnetic atmosphere. The magnetic field vector and filling factor are reliable inferred in only 50\% based on the regular profiles. Therefore, 12\% of the field of view harbour hG fields with filling factors typically below 30\%. At our present spatial resolution, 70\% of the pixels apparently are non-magnetised.
  • Regardless of the physical origin of stellar magnetic fields - fossil or dynamo induced - an inclination angle between the magnetic and rotation axes is very often observed. Absence of observational evidence in this direction in the solar case has led to generally assume that its global magnetic field and rotation axes are well aligned. We present the detection of a monthly periodic signal of the photospheric solar magnetic field at all latitudes, and especially near the poles, revealing that the main axis of the Sun's magnetic field is not aligned with the surface rotation axis. This result reinforces the view of our Sun as a common intermediate-mass star. Furthermore this detection challenges and imposes a strong observational constraint to modern solar dynamo theories.
  • We study the polar magnetism near an activity maximum when these regions change their polarity, from which it is expected that its magnetism should be less affected by the global field. To fully characterise the magnetic field vector, we use deep full Stokes polarimetric observations of the 15648.5 {\AA} and 15652.8 {\AA} FeI lines. We observe the north pole as well as a quiet region at disc centre to compare their field distributions. In order to calibrate the projection effects, we observe an additional quiet region at the east limb. We find that the two limb datasets share similar magnetic field vector distributions. This means that close to a maximum, the poles look like typical limb, quiet-Sun regions. However, the magnetic field distributions at the limbs are different from the distribution inferred at disc centre. At the limbs, we infer a new population of magnetic fields with relatively strong intensities ($\sim$600-$\sim$800 G), inclined by 30 deg with respect to the line of sight, and with an azimuth aligned with the solar disc radial direction. We propose that this new population at the limbs is due to the observation of unresolved magnetic loops as seen close to the limb. These loops have typical granular sizes as measured in the disc centre. At the limbs, where the spatial resolution decreases, we observe them spatially unresolved, which explains the new population of magnetic fields that is inferred. This is the first (indirect) evidence of small-scale magnetic loops outside the disc centre and would imply that these small-scale structures are ubiquitous on the entire solar surface. This result has profound implications for the energetics not only of the photosphere, but also of the outer layers since these loops have been reported to reach the chromosphere and the low corona.
  • We observed an arch filament system (AFS) in a sunspot group with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph attached to the GREGOR solar telescope. The AFS was located between the leading sunspot of negative polarity and several pores of positive polarity forming the following part of the sunspot group. We recorded five spectro-polarimetric scans of this region. The spectral range included the spectral lines Si I 1082.7 nm, He I 1083.0 nm, and Ca I 1083.9 nm. In this work we concentrate on the silicon line which is formed in the upper photosphere. The line profiles are inverted with the code `Stokes Inversion based on Response functions' to obtain the magnetic field vector. The line-of-sight velocities are determined independently with a Fourier phase method. Maximum velocities are found close to the ends of AFS fibrils. These maximum values amount to 2.4 km/s next to the pores and to 4 km/s at the sunspot side. Between the following pores, we encounter an area of negative polarity that is decreasing during the five scans. We interpret this by new emerging positive flux in this area canceling out the negative flux. In summary, our findings confirm the scenario that rising magnetic flux tubes cause the AFS.
  • Combining high-resolution spectropolarimetric and imaging data is key to understanding the decay process of sunspots as it allows us scrutinizing the velocity and magnetic fields of sunspots and their surroundings. Active region NOAA 12597 was observed on 24/09/2016 with the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope using high-spatial resolution imaging as well as imaging spectroscopy and near-infrared (NIR) spectropolarimetry. Horizontal proper motions were estimated with LCT, whereas LOS velocities were computed with spectral line fitting methods. The magnetic field properties were inferred with the SIR code for the Si I and Ca I NIR lines. At the time of the GREGOR observations, the leading sunspot had two light-bridges indicating the onset of its decay. One of the light-bridges disappeared, and an elongated, dark umbral core at its edge appeared in a decaying penumbral sector facing the newly emerging flux. The flow and magnetic field properties of this penumbral sector exhibited weak Evershed flow, moat flow, and horizontal magnetic field. The penumbral gap adjacent to the elongated umbral core and the penumbra in that penumbral sector displayed LOS velocities similar to granulation. The separating polarities of a new flux system interacted with the leading and central part of the already established active region. As a consequence, the leading spot rotated 55-degree in clockwise direction over 12 hours. In the high-resolution observations of a decaying sunspot, the penumbral filaments facing flux emergence site contained a darkened area resembling an umbral core filled with umbral dots. This umbral core had velocity and magnetic field properties similar to the sunspot umbra. This implies that the horizontal magnetic fields in the decaying penumbra became vertical as observed in flare-induced rapid penumbral decay, but on a very different time-scale.
  • We investigate the properties of a sunspot light-bridge, focusing on the changes produced by the impact of a plasma blob ejected from a C-class flare. We observed a sunspot in active region NOAA 12544 using spectropolarimetric raster maps of the four Fe I lines around 15655 \AA\ with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS), narrow-band intensity images sampling the Fe I 6173 \AA\ line with the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer (GFPI), and intensity broad band images in G-band and Ca II H band with the High-resolution Fast Imager (HiFI). All these instruments are located at the GREGOR telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The data cover the time before, during, and after the flare event. The analysis is complemented with Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The physical parameters of the atmosphere at differents heights were inferred using spectral-line inversion techniques. We identify photospheric and chromospheric brightenings, heating events, and changes in the Stokes profiles associated to the flare eruption and the subsequent arrival of the plasma blob to the light bridge, after traveling along an active region loop. The measurements suggest that these phenomena are the result of reconnection events driven by the interaction of the plasma blob with the magnetic field topology of the light bridge.
  • The magnetic fields of the quiet Sun cover at any time more than 90\% of its surface and their magnetic energy budget is crucial to explain the thermal structure of the solar atmosphere. One of the possible origins of these fields is due to the action of local dynamo in the upper convection zone of the Sun. Existing simulations of the local solar dynamo require an initial seed field, and sufficiently high spatial resolution, in order to achieve the amplification of the seed field to the observed values in the quiet Sun. Here we report an alternative model of seeding based on the action of the Bierman battery effect. This effect generates a magnetic field due to the local imbalances in electron pressure in the partially ionized solar plasma. We show that the battery effect self-consistently creates from zero an initial seed field of a strength of the order of micro G, and together with dynamo amplification, allows the generation of quiet Sun magnetic fields of a similar strength to those from solar observations.
  • $Context$. The thermal structure of the penumbra below its visible surface (i.e., $\tau_5 \ge 1$) has important implications for our present understanding of sunspots and their penumbrae: their brightness and energy transport, mode conversion of magneto-acoustic waves, sunspot seismology, and so forth. $Aims$. We aim at determining the thermal stratification in the layers immediately beneath the visible surface of the penumbra: $\tau_5 \in [1,3]$ ($\approx 70-80$ km below the visible continuum-forming layer). $Methods$. We analyzed spectropolarimetric data (i.e., Stokes profiles) in three Fe \textsc{i} lines located at 1565 nm observed with the GRIS instrument attached to the 1.5-meter solar telescope GREGOR. The data are corrected for the smearing effects of wide-angle scattered light and then subjected to an inversion code for the radiative transfer equation in order to retrieve, among others, the temperature as a function of optical depth $T(\tau_5)$. $Results$. We find that the temperature gradient below the visible surface of the penumbra is smaller than in the quiet Sun. This implies that in the region $\tau_5 \ge 1$ the penumbral temperature diverges from that of the quiet Sun. The same result is obtained when focusing only on the thermal structure below the surface of bright penumbral filaments. We interpret these results as evidence of a thick penumbra, whereby the magnetopause is not located near its visible surface. In addition, we find that the temperature gradient in bright penumbral filaments is lower than in granules. This can be explained in terms of the limited expansion of a hot upflow inside a penumbral filament relative to a granular upflow, as magnetic pressure and tension forces from the surrounding penumbral magnetic field hinder an expansion like this.
  • This work aims to understand the behavior of non-linear waves in the vicinity of a coronal null point. In previous works we have showed that high frequency waves are generated in such magnetic configuration. This paper studies those waves in detail in order to provide a plausible explanation of their generation. We demonstrate that slow magneto-acoustic shock waves generated in the chromosphere propagate through the null point and produce a train of secondary shocks that escape along the field lines. A particular combination of the shock wave speeds generates waves at a frequency of 80 mHz. We speculate that this frequency may be sensitive to the atmospheric parameters in the corona and therefore can be used to probe the structure of this solar layer.
  • A new generation of solar instruments provides improved spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution, thus facilitating a better understanding of dynamic processes on the Sun. High-resolution observations often reveal multiple-component spectral line profiles, e.g., in the near-infrared He I 10830 \AA\ triplet, which provides information about the chromospheric velocity and magnetic fine structure. We observed an emerging flux region, including two small pores and an arch filament system, on 2015 April 17 with the 'very fast spectroscopic mode' of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) situated at the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We discuss this method of obtaining fast (one per minute) spectral scans of the solar surface and its potential to follow dynamic processes on the Sun. We demonstrate the performance of the 'very fast spectroscopic mode' by tracking chromospheric high-velocity features in the arch filament system.
  • Active regions are the most prominent manifestations of solar magnetic fields; their generation and dissipation are fundamental problems in solar physics. Light bridges are commonly present during sunspot decay, but a comprehensive picture of their role in the removal of photospheric magnetic field is still missing. We study the three dimensional configuration of a sunspot and in particular its light bridge during one of the last stages of its decay. We present the magnetic and thermodynamical stratification inferred from full Stokes inversions of the photospheric Si I 10827 \AA\ and Ca I 10839 \AA\ lines obtained with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph of the GREGOR telescope at Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The analysis is complemented by a study of continuum images covering the disk passage of the active region, which are provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The sunspot shows a light bridge with penumbral continuum intensity that separates the central umbra from a smaller umbra. We find that in this region the magnetic field lines form a canopy with lower magnetic field strength in the inner part. The photospheric light bridge is dominated by gas pressure (high-$\beta$), as opposed to the surrounding umbra where the magnetic pressure is higher. A convective flow is observed in the light bridge. This flow is able to bend the magnetic field lines and to produce field reversals. The field lines close above the light bridge and become as vertical and strong as in the surrounding umbra. We conclude that it develops because of two highly magnetized regions which come closer during the sunspot evolution.
  • The various mechanisms of magneto-convective energy transport determines the structure of sunspots and active regions. We characterise the appearance of light bridges and other fine-structure details and elaborate on their magneto-convective nature. We present speckle-reconstructed images taken with the broad-band imager at the 1.5 m GREGOR telescope in the 486nm and 589nm bands. We estimate the spatial resolution from the noise characteristics of the image bursts and obtain 0.08" at 589nm. We describe structure details in individual best images as well as the temporal evolution of selected features. We find branched dark lanes extending along thin (~1") light bridges in sunspots at various heliocentric angles. In thick (~2") light bridges the branches are disconnected from the central lane and have a Y shape with a bright grain toward the umbra. The images reveal that light bridges exist on varying intensity levels and that their small-scale features evolve on timescales of minutes. Faint light bridges show dark lanes outlined by the surrounding bright features. Dark lanes are very common and are also found in the boundary of pores. They have a characteristic width of 0.1" or smaller. Intergranular dark lanes of that width are seen in active region granulation. While central dark lanes in thin light bridges are elevated and associated with an density increase above upflows, the dark lane branches correspond to locations of downflows and are depressed relative to the adjacent bright plasma. Thick light bridges with central dark lanes show no projection effect. They have a flat elevated plateau that falls off steeply at the umbral boundary. There, Y-shaped filaments form as they do in the inner penumbra. This indicates the presence of inclined magnetic fields, meaning that the umbral magnetic field is wrapped around the convective light bridge.
  • The fine-structure of magnetic field of a sunspot penumbra in the upper chromosphere is to be explored and compared to that in the photosphere. High spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the 1.5-meter GREGOR telescope using the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS). The observed spectral domain includes the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm and the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm spectral lines. The upper chromospheric magnetic field is obtained by inverting the He I triplet assuming a Milne-Eddington type model atmosphere. A height dependent inversion was applied to the Si I 1082.7 nm and Ca I 1083.3 nm lines to obtain the photospheric magnetic field. We find that the inclination of the magnetic field shows variations in the azimuthal direction both in the photosphere, but also in the upper chromosphere. The chromospheric variations remarkably well coincide with the variations in the inclination of the photospheric field and resemble the well-known spine and inter-spine structure in the photospheric layers of penumbrae. The typical peak-to-peak variations in the inclination of the magnetic field in the upper chromosphere is found to be 10-15 degree, i.e., roughly half the variation in the photosphere. In contrast, the magnetic field strength of the observed penumbra does not show variations on small spatial scales in the upper chromosphere. Thanks to the high spatial resolution observations possible with the GREGOR telescope at 1.08 microns, we find that the prominent small-scale fluctuations in the magnetic field inclination, which are a salient part of the property of sunspot penumbral photospheres, also persist in the chromosphere, although at somewhat reduced amplitudes. Such a complex magnetic configuration may facilitate penumbral chromospheric dynamic phenomena, such as penumbral micro-jets or transient bright dots.
  • Context. A significant part of the penumbral magnetic field returns below the surface in the very deep photosphere. For lines in the visible, a large portion of this return field can only be detected indirectly by studying its imprints on strongly asymmetric and three-lobed Stokes V profiles. Infrared lines probe a narrow layer in the very deep photosphere, providing the possibility of directly measuring the orientation of magnetic fields close to the solar surface. Aims. We study the topology of the penumbral magnetic field in the lower photosphere, focusing on regions where it returns below the surface. Methods. We analyzed 71 spectropolarimetric datasets from Hinode and from the GREGOR infrared spectrograph. We inferred the quality and polarimetric accuracy of the infrared data after applying several reduction steps. Techniques of spectral inversion and forward synthesis were used to test the detection algorithm. We compared the morphology and the fractional penumbral area covered by reversed-polarity and three-lobed Stokes V profiles for sunspots at disk center. We determined the amount of reversed-polarity and three-lobed Stokes V profiles in visible and infrared data of sunspots at various heliocentric angles. From the results, we computed center-to-limb variation curves, which were interpreted in the context of existing penumbral models. Results. Observations in visible and near-infrared spectral lines yield a significant difference in the penumbral area covered by magnetic fields of opposite polarity. In the infrared, the number of reversed-polarity Stokes V profiles is smaller by a factor of two than in the visible. For three-lobed Stokes V profiles the numbers differ by up to an order of magnitude.
  • Some models for the topology of the magnetic field in sunspot penumbrae predict the existence of field-free or dynamically weak-field regions in the deep Photosphere. To confirm or rule out the existence of weak-field regions in the deepest photospheric layers of the penumbra. The magnetic field at $\log\tau_5=0$ is investigated by means of inversions of spectropolarimetric data of two different sunspots located very close to disk center with a spatial resolution of approximately 0.4-0.45 arcsec. The data have been recorded using the GRIS instrument attached to the 1.5-meters GREGOR solar telescope at El Teide observatory. It includes three Fe I lines around 1565 nm, whose sensitivity to the magnetic field peaks at half a pressure-scale-height deeper than the sensitivity of the widely used Fe I spectral line pair at 630 nm. Prior to the inversion, the data is corrected for the effects of scattered light using a deconvolution method with several point spread functions. At $\log\tau_5=0$ we find no evidence for the existence of regions with dynamically weak ($B<500$ Gauss) magnetic fields in sunspot penumbrae. This result is much more reliable than previous investigations done with Fe I lines at 630 nm. Moreover, the result is independent of the number of nodes employed in the inversion, and also independent of the point spread function used to deconvolve the data, and does not depend on the amount of straylight (i.e. wide-angle scattered light) considered.
  • Aims. Combining high-resolution and synoptic observations aims to provide a comprehensive description of flux emergence at photospheric level and of the growth process that eventually leads to a mature active region. Methods. Small active region NOAA 12118 was observed on 2014 July 18 with the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope on 2014 July 18. High-resolution time-series of blue continuum and G-band images acquired in the blue imaging channel (BIC) of the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer (GFPI) were complemented by LOS magnetograms and continuum images obtained with the HMI onboard the SDO. Horizontal proper motions and horizontal plasma velocities were computed with local correlation tracking (LCT) and the differential affine velocity estimator, respectively. Morphological image processing was employed to measure the photometric/magnetic area, magnetic flux, and the separation profile of the EFR during its evolution. Results. The computed growth rates for photometric area, magnetic area, and magnetic flux are about twice as high as the respective decay rates. The space-time diagram using HMI magnetograms of five days traces a leaf-like structure, which is determined by the initial separation of the two polarities, a rapid expansion phase, a time when the spread stalls, and a period when the region slowly shrinks again. The separation rate of 0.26 km\s is highest in the initial stage, and it decreases when the separation comes to a halt. Horizontal plasma velocities computed at four evolutionary stages indicate a changing pattern of inflows. In LCT maps we find persistent flow patterns such as outward motions in the outer part of the two major pores, a diverging feature near the trailing pore marking the site of upwelling plasma and flux emergence, and low velocities in the interior of pores. We detected many elongated rapidly expanding granules between the two major polarities.
  • Solar tornadoes are dark vertical filamentary structures observed in the extreme ultraviolet associated with prominence legs and filament barbs. Their true nature and relationship to prominences requires understanding their magnetic structure and dynamic properties. Recently, a controversy has arisen: is the magnetic field organized forming vertical, helical structures or is it dominantly horizontal? And concerning their dynamics, are tornadoes really rotating or is it just a visual illusion? Here, we analyze four consecutive spectropolarimetric scans of a prominence hosting tornadoes on its legs which help us shed some light on their magnetic and dynamical properties. We show that the magnetic field is very smooth in all the prominence, probably an intrinsic property of the coronal field. The prominence legs have vertical helical fields that show slow temporal variation probably related to the motion of the fibrils. Concerning the dynamics, we argue that 1) if rotation exists, it is intermittent, lasting no more than one hour, and 2) the observed velocity pattern is also consistent with an oscillatory velocity pattern (waves).
  • Accurate measurements of magnetic and velocity fields in and around solar active regions are key to unlocking the mysteries of the formation and the decay of sunspots. High spatial resolution image and spectral sequences with a high cadence obtained with the GREGOR solar telescope give us an opportunity to scrutinize 3-D flow fields with local correlation tracking and imaging spectroscopy. We present GREGOR early science data acquired in 2014 July - August with the GREGOR Fabry-P\'erot Interferometer and the Blue Imaging Channel. Time-series of blue continuum (? 450.6 nm) images of the small active region NOAA 12118 were restored with the speckle masking technique to derive horizontal proper motions and to track the evolution of morphological changes. In addition, high-resolution observations are discussed in the context of synoptic data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.
  • The new generation of solar instruments provides better spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution for a better understanding of the physical processes that take place on the Sun. Multiple-component profiles are more commonly observed with these instruments. Particularly, the He I 10830 \r{A} triplet presents such peculiar spectral profiles, which give information on the velocity and magnetic fine structure of the upper chromosphere. The purpose of this investigation is to describe a technique to efficiently fit the two blended components of the He I 10830 \r{A} triplet, which are commonly observed when two atmospheric components are located within the same resolution element. The observations used in this study were taken on 2015 April 17 with the very fast spectroscopic mode of the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) attached to the 1.5-meter GREGOR solar telescope, located at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. We apply a double-Lorentzian fitting technique using Levenberg-Marquardt least-squares minimization. This technique is very simple and much faster than inversion codes. Line-of-sight Doppler velocities can be inferred for a whole map of pixels within just a few minutes. Our results show sub- and supersonic downflow velocities of up to 32 km/s for the fast component in the vicinity of footpoints of filamentary structures. The slow component presents velocities close to rest.
  • Large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations (LALOs) in prominences are spectacular manifestations of the solar activity. In such events nearby energetic disturbances induce periodic motions on filaments with displacements comparable to the size of the filaments themselves and with velocities larger than 20 km/s. The pendulum model, in which the gravity projected along a rigid magnetic field is the restoring force, was proposed to explain these events. However, it can be objected that in a realistic situation where the magnetic field reacts to the mass motion of the heavy prominence, the simplified pendulum model could be no longer valid. We have performed non-linear time-dependent numerical simulations of LALOs considering a dipped magnetic field line structure. In this work we demonstrate that for even relatively weak magnetic fields the pendulum model works very well. We therefore validate the pendulum model and show its robustness, with important implications for prominence seismology purposes. With this model it is possible to infer the geometry of the dipped field lines that support the prominence.
  • The amplitudes of the Evershed flow are measured using pairs of carefully selected FeI and FeII spectral lines located close in wavelength and registered simultaneously. A sunspot belonging to the NOAA 11582 group was scanned using the spectrograph of the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife). Velocities were extracted from intensity profiles using the lambda-meter technique. The formation heights of the observed spectral lines were calculated using semi-empirical models of a bright and dark penumbral filament taking into account the sunspot location at the limb. Our objective is to compare azimuthally averaged amplitudes of the Evershed flow extracted from neutral and ion lines. We find measurable differences in the radial component of the flow. All five pairs of lines show the same tendency, with a few hundred m/s larger amplitude of the flow measured from FeI lines compared to FeII lines. This tendency is preserved at all photospheric heights and radial distances in the penumbra. We discuss the possible origin of this effect.
  • Coronal waves are an important aspect of the dynamics of the plasma in the corona. Wavefront dislocations are topological features of most waves in nature and also of magnetohydrodynamic waves. Are there dislocations in coronal waves? The finding and explanation of dislocations may shed light on the nature and characteristics of the propagating waves, their interaction in the corona and in general on the plasma dynamics. We positively identify dislocations in coronal waves observed by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) as singularities in the Doppler shifts of emission coronal lines. We study the possible singularities that can be expected in coronal waves and try to reproduce the observed dislocations in terms of localization and frequency of appearance. The observed dislocations can only be explained by the interference of a kink and a sausage wave modes propagating with different frequencies along the coronal magnetic field. In the plane transverse to the propagation, the cross-section of the oscillating plasma must be smaller than the spatial resolution, and the two waves result in net longitudinal and transverse velocity components that are mixed through projection onto the line of sight. Alfv\'en waves can be responsible of the kink mode, but a magnetoacoustic sausage mode is necessary in all cases. Higher (flute) modes are excluded. The kink mode has a pressure amplitude that is smaller than the pressure amplitude of the sausage mode, though its observed velocity is larger. This concentrates dislocations on the top of the loop. To explain dislocations, any model of coronal waves must include the simultaneous propagation and interference of kink and sausage wave modes of comparable but different frequencies, with a sausage wave amplitude much smaller than the kink one.
  • This letter reports on a set of full-Stokes spectropolarimetric observations in the near infrared He I 10830 A spectral region covering the pre-, flare, and post-flare phases of an M3.2 class solar flare. The flare originated on 2013 May 17 and belonged to active region NOAA 11748. We detected strong He I 10830 A emission in the flare. The red component of the He I triplet peaks at an intensity ratio to the continuum of about 1.86. During the flare, He I Stokes V is substantially larger and appears reversed compared to the usually larger Si I Stokes V profile. The photospheric Si I inversions of the four Stokes profiles reveal the following: (1) the magnetic field strength in the photosphere decreases or is even absent during the flare phase, as compared to the pre-flare phase. However, this decrease is not permanent. After the flare the magnetic field recovers its pre-flare configuration in a short time (i.e., in 30 minutes after the flare). (2) In the photosphere, the line-of-sight velocities show a regular granular up- and down-flow pattern before the flare erupts. During the flare, upflows (blueshifts) dominate the area where the flare is produced. Evaporation rates of ~ $10^{-3}$ and ~ $10^{-4}$ g cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ have been derived in the deep and high photosphere, respectively, capable of increasing the chromospheric density by a factor of two in about 400 seconds.
  • We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at a prominence-corona transition region in a non-linear regime. Our aim is to understand how the presence of neutral atoms in the prominence plasma influences the instability growth rate, and the evolution of velocity, magnetic field vector and thermodynamic parameters of turbulent drops. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the instability initiated by a multi-mode perturbation at the corona-prominence interface using a single-fluid MHD approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial equilibrium configuration is purely hydrostatic and contains a homogeneous horizontal magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. We analyze simulations with two different orientations of the magnetic field. For each field orientation we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in the Ohm's law (AD case). Other than that, both simulations for each field orientation are identical. The numerical results in the initial stage of the instability are compared with the analytical linear calculations. We find that the configuration is always unstable in the AD case. The growth rate of the small-scale modes in the non-linear regime is up to 50% larger in the AD case than in the purely MHD case and the average velocities of flows are a few percent larger. Significant drift momenta are found at the interface between the coronal and the prominence material at all stages of the instability, produced by the faster downward motion of the neutral component with respect to the ionized component. The differences in temperature of the bubbles between the ideal and non-ideal case are also significant, reaching 30%. There is an asymmetry between large rising bubbles and small-scale down flowing fingers, favoring the detection of upward velocities in observations.
  • We study the modification of the classical criterion for the linear onset and growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a partially ionized (PI) plasma in the one-fluid description, considering a generalized induction equation. The governing linear equations and appropriate boundary conditions, including gravitational terms, are derived and applied to the case of the RTI in a single interface between two partially ionized plasmas. The boundary conditions lead to an equation for the frequencies in which some of them have positive complex parts, marking the appearance of the RTI. We study the ambipolar term alone first, extending the result to the full induction equation later. We find that the configuration is always unstable because of the presence of a neutral species. In the classical stability regime the growth rate is small, since the collisions prevent the neutral fluid to fully develop the RTI. For parameters in the classical instability regime the growth rate is lowered, but for the considered theoretical values of the collision frequencies and diffusion coefficients for solar prominences the differences with the compressible MHD case are small. We conclude that PI modifies some aspects of the linear RTI instability, since it takes into account that neutrals do not feel the stabilizing effect of the magnetic field. For the set of parameters representative for solar prominences, our model gives the resulting timescale comparable with observed lifetimes of RTI plumes.