• Roth et al (2014a) reported evidence for plumes of water venting from a southern high latitude region on Europa - spectroscopic detection of off-limb line emission from the dissociation products of water. Here, we present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) direct images of Europa in the far ultraviolet (FUV) as it transited the smooth face of Jupiter, in order to measure absorption from gas or aerosols beyond the Europa limb. Out of ten observations we found three in which plume activity could be implicated. Two show statistically significant features at latitudes similar to Roth et al, and the third, at a more equatorial location. We consider potential systematic effects that might influence the statistical analysis and create artifacts, and are unable to find any that can definitively explain the features, although there are reasons to be cautious. If the apparent absorption features are real, the magnitude of implied outgassing is similar to that of the Roth et al feature, however the apparent activity appears more frequently in our data.
  • Laming (1990) predicted that the narrow Balmer line core of the ~3000 km/s shock in the SN 1006 remnant would be significantly polarized due to electron and proton impact polarization. Here, based on deep spectrally resolved polarimetry obtained with the European Southern Observatory (ESO)'s Very Large Telescope (VLT), we report the discovery of polarized line emission of polarization degree approx 1.3 percent with position angle orthogonal to the SNR filament. Correcting for an unpolarized broad line component, the implied narrow line polarization is approx 2.0 percent, close to the predictions of Laming (1990). The predicted polarization is primarily sensitive to shock velocity and post-shock temperature equilibration. By measuring polarization for the SN1006 remnant, we validate and enable a new diagnostic that has important applications in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, such as shocks, intense radiation fields, high energy particle streams and conductive interfaces.
  • As one of the most luminous Cepheids in the Milky Way, the 41.5-day RS Puppis is an analog of the long-period Cepheids used to measure extragalactic distances. An accurate distance to this star would therefore help anchor the zero-point of the bright end of the period-luminosity relation. But, at a distance of about 2 kpc, RS Pup is too far away for measuring a direct trigonometric parallax with a precision of a few percent with existing instrumentation. RS Pup is unique in being surrounded by a reflection nebula, whose brightness varies as pulses of light from the Cepheid propagate outwards. We present new polarimetric imaging of the nebula obtained with HST/ACS. The derived map of the degree of linear polarization pL allows us to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of the dust distribution. To retrieve the scattering angle from the pL value, we consider two different polarization models, one based on a Milky Way dust mixture and one assuming Rayleigh scattering. Considering the derived dust distribution in the nebula, we adjust a model of the phase lag of the photometric variations over selected nebular features to retrieve the distance of RS Pup. We obtain a distance of 1910 +/- 80 pc (4.2%), corresponding to a parallax of 0.524 +/- 0.022 mas. The agreement between the two polarization models we considered is good, but the final uncertainty is dominated by systematics in the adopted model parameters. The distance we obtain is consistent with existing measurements from the literature, but light echoes provide a distance estimate that is not subject to the same systematic uncertainties as other estimators (e.g. the Baade-Wesselink technique). RS Pup therefore provides an important fiducial for the calibration of systematic uncertainties of the long-period Cepheid distance scale.
  • The long-period Cepheid RS Pup is surrounded by a large dusty nebula reflecting the light from the central star. Due to the changing luminosity of the central source, light echoes propagate into the nebula. This remarkable phenomenon was the subject of Paper I.The origin and physical properties of the nebula are however uncertain: it may have been created through mass loss from the star itself, or it could be the remnant of a pre-existing interstellar cloud. Our goal is to determine the 3D structure of the nebula, and estimate its mass. Knowing the geometrical shape of the nebula will also allow us to retrieve the distance of RS Pup in an unambiguous manner using a model of its light echoes (in a forthcoming work). The scattering angle of the Cepheid light in the circumstellar nebula can be recovered from its degree of linear polarization. We thus observed the nebula surrounding RS Pup using the polarimetric imaging mode of the VLT/FORS instrument, and obtained a map of the degree and position angle of linear polarization. From our FORS observations, we derive a 3D map of the distribution of the dust, whose overall geometry is an irregular and thin layer. The nebula does not present a well-defined symmetry. Using a simple model, we derive a total dust mass of M(dust) = 2.9 +/- 0.9 Msun for the dust within 1.8 arcmin of the Cepheid. This translates into a total mass of M(gas+dust) = 290 +/- 120 Msun, assuming a dust-to-gas ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 %. The high mass of the dusty nebula excludes that it was created by mass-loss from the star. However, the thinness nebula is an indication that the Cepheid participated to its shaping, e.g. through its radiation pressure or stellar wind. RS Pup therefore appears as a regular long-period Cepheid located in an exceptionally dense interstellar environment.
  • Gas at intermediate temperature between the hot X-ray emitting coronal gas in galaxies at the centers of galaxy clusters, and the much cooler optical line emitting filaments, yields information on transport processes and plausible scenarios for the relationship between X-ray cool cores and other galactic phenomena such as mergers or the onset of an active galactic nucleus. Hitherto, detection of intermediate temperature gas has proven elusive. Here, we present FUV imaging of the "low excitation" emission filaments of M87 and show strong evidence for the presence of CIV 1549 A emission which arises in gas at temperature ~10^5K co-located with Halpha+[NII] emission from cooler ~10^4K gas. We infer that the hot and cool phases are in thermal communication, and show that quantitatively the emission strength is consistent with thermal conduction, which in turn may account for many of the observed characteristics of cool core galaxy clusters.
  • As first Paper of a series devoted to study the old stellar population in clusters and fields in the Small Magellanic Cloud, we present deep observations of NGC121 in the F555W and F814W filters, obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The resulting color-magnitude diagram reaches ~3.5 mag below the main-sequence turn-off; deeper than any previous data. We derive the age of NGC121 using both absolute and relative age-dating methods. Fitting isochrones in the ACS photometric system to the observed ridge line of NGC121, gives ages of 11.8 +- 0.5 Gyr (Teramo), 11.2 +- 0.5 Gyr (Padova) and 10.5 +- 0.5 Gyr (Dartmouth). The cluster ridge line is best approximated by the alpha-enhanced Dartmouth isochrones. Placing our relative ages on an absolute age scale, we find ages of 10.9 +- 0.5 Gyr (from the magnitude difference between the main-sequence turn-off and the horizontal branch) and 11.5 +- 0.5 Gyr (from the absolute magnitude of the horizontal branch), respectively. These five different age determinations are all lower by 2 - 3 Gyr than the ages of the oldest Galactic globular clusters of comparable metallicity. Therefore we confirm the earlier finding that the oldest globular cluster in the Small Magellanic Cloud, NGC121, is a few Gyr younger than its oldest counterparts in the Milky Way and in other nearby dwarf galaxies such as the Large Magellanic Cloud, Fornax, and Sagittarius. If it were accreted into the Galactic halo, NGC121 would resemble the ''young halo globulars'', although it is not as young as the youngest globular clusters associated with the Sagittarius dwarf. The young age of NGC121 could result from delayed cluster formation in the Small Magellanic Cloud or result from the random survival of only one example of an initially small number star clusters.