• Galaxy surveys have suggested that rapid and sustained decrease in the star-formation rate, "quenching", in massive disk galaxies is frequently related to the presence of a bar. Optical and near-IR observations reveal that nearly 60% of disk galaxies in the local universe are barred, thus it is important to understand the relationship between bars and star formation in disk galaxies. Recent observational results imply that the Milky Way quenched about 9-10 Gyr ago, at the transition between the cessation of the growth of the kinematically hot, old, metal-poor thick disk and the kinematically colder, younger, and more metal-rich thin disk. Although perhaps coincidental, the quenching episode could also be related to the formation of the bar. To explore the relation between bar formation and star formation in gas rich galaxies quantitatively, we simulated gas-rich disk isolated galaxies. Our simulations include prescriptions for star formation, stellar feedback, and for regulating the multi-phase interstellar medium. We find that the action of stellar bar efficiently quenches star formation, reducing the star-formation rate by a factor of 10 in less than 1 Gyr. Analytical and self-consistent galaxy simulations with bars suggest that the action of the stellar bar increases the gas random motions within the co-rotation radius of the bar. Indeed, we detect an increase in the gas velocity dispersion up to 20-35 km/s at the end of the bar formation phase. The star-formation efficiency decreases rapidly, and in all of our models, the bar quenches the star formation in the galaxy. The star-formation efficiency is much lower in simulated barred compared to unbarred galaxies and more rapid bar formation implies more rapid quenching.
  • It is not yet known if the properties of molecular gas in distant protocluster galaxies are significantly affected by their environment as galaxies are in local clusters. Through a deep, 64 hours of effective on-source integration with the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), we discovered a massive, M_mol=2.0+-0.2x10^11 M_sun, extended, ~40 kpc, CO(1-0)-emitting disk in the protocluster surrounding the radio galaxy, MRC1138-262. The galaxy, at z_CO=2.1478, is a clumpy, massive disk galaxy, M_star~5x10^11 M_sun, which lies 250 kpc in projection from MRC1138-262 and is a known H-alpha emitter, HAE229. HAE229 has a molecular gas fraction of ~30%. The CO emission has a kinematic gradient along its major axis, centered on the highest surface brightness rest-frame optical emission, consistent with HAE229 being a rotating disk. Surprisingly, a significant fraction of the CO emission lies outside of the UV/optical emission. In spite of this, HAE229 follows the same relation between star-formation rate and molecular gas mass as normal field galaxies. HAE229 is the first CO(1-0) detection of an ordinary, star-forming galaxy in a protocluster. We compare a sample of cluster members at z>0.4 that are detected in low-order CO transitions with a similar sample of sources drawn from the field. We confirm findings that the CO-luminosity and FWHM are correlated in starbursts and show that this relation is valid for normal high-z galaxies as well as those in overdensities. We do not find a clear dichotomy in the integrated Schmidt-Kennicutt relation for protocluster and field galaxies. Not finding any environmental dependence in the "star-formation efficiency" or the molecular gas content, especially for such an extended CO disk, suggests that environmentally-specific processes such as ram pressure stripping are not operating efficiently in (proto)clusters. (abridged)
  • This paper presents the spatially resolved star formation history (SFH) of nearby galaxies with the aim of furthering our understanding of the different processes involved in the formation and evolution of galaxies. To this end, we apply the fossil record method of stellar population synthesis to a rich and diverse data set of 436 galaxies observed with integral field spectroscopy in the CALIFA survey. The sample covers a wide range of Hubble types, with stellar masses ranging from $M_\star \sim 10^9$ to $7 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$. Spectral synthesis techniques are applied to the datacubes to retrieve the spatially resolved time evolution of the star formation rate (SFR), its intensity ($\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$), and other descriptors of the 2D-SFH in seven bins of galaxy morphology (E, S0, Sa, Sb, Sbc, Sc, and Sd), and five bins of stellar mass. Our main results are: a) Galaxies form very fast independently of their current stellar mass, with the peak of star formation at high redshift ($z > 2$). Subsequent star formation is driven by $M_\star$ and morphology, with less massive and later type spirals showing more prolonged periods of star formation. b) At any epoch in the past the SFR is proportional to $M_\star$, with most massive galaxies having the highest absolute (but lowest specific) SFRs. c) While nowadays $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ is similar for all spirals, and significantly lower in early type galaxies (ETG), in the past $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ scales well with morphology. The central regions of today's ETGs are where $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ reached the highest values ($> 10^3 \,M_\odot\,$Gyr$^{-1}\,$pc$^{-2}$), similar to those measured in high redshift star forming galaxies. d) The evolution of $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ in Sbc systems matches that of models for Milky-Way-like galaxies, suggesting that the formation of a thick disk may be a common phase in spirals at early epochs.
  • We present VLT/SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of the warm ionized gas in 33 powerful radio galaxies at redshifts z>~2, which are excellent sites to study the interplay of rapidly accreting active galactic nuclei and the interstellar medium of the host galaxy in the very late formation stages of massive galaxies. Our targets span two orders of magnitude in radio size (2-400 kpc) and kinetic jet energy (a few 10^46 to almost 10^48 erg s^-1). All sources have complex gas kinematics with broad line widths up to ~1300 km s^-1. About half have bipolar velocity fields with offsets up to 1500 km s^-1 and are consistent with global back-to-back outflows. The others have complex velocity distributions, often with multiple abrupt velocity jumps far from the nucleus of the galaxy, and are not associated with a major merger in any obvious way. We present several empirical constraints that show why gas kinematics and radio jets seem to be physically related. The gas kinetic energy from large scale bulk and local outflow or turbulent motion corresponds to a few 10^-3 to 10^-2 of the kinetic energy of the jet. In galaxies with jet power >~10^47 erg s^-1, the bulk kinetic energy dominates the total energy budget of the gas, suggesting that the outflows encompasses the global interstellar medium, perhaps facilitated by the strong gas turbulence. We compare with recent hydrodynamic simulations, and discuss the potential consequences for the subsequent evolution of massive high-z galaxies. The gas-phase metallicities in our galaxies are lower than in most low-z AGN, but nonetheless solar or even super-solar, suggesting that the ISM in these galaxies is very similar to the gas from which massive low-redshift galaxies formed most of their gas. This further highlights that we are seeing these galaxies near the end of their active formation phase.
  • Quenching, the cessation of star formation, is one of the most significant events in the life cycle of galaxies. We show here the first evidence that the Milky Way experienced a generalised quenching of its star formation at the end of its thick disk formation $\sim$9 Gyr ago. Elemental abundances of stars studied as part of the APOGEE survey reveal indeed that in less than $\sim$2 Gyr the star formation rate in our Galaxy dropped by an order-of-magnitude. Because of the tight correlation between age and alpha abundance, this event reflects in the dearth of stars along the inner disk sequence in the [Fe/H]-[$\alpha$/Fe] plane. Before this phase, which lasted about 1.5 Gyr, the Milky Way was actively forming stars. Afterwards, the star formation resumed at a much lower level to form the thin disk. These events are very well matched by the latest observation of MW-type progenitors at high redshifts. In late type galaxies, quenching is believed to be related to a long and secular exhaustion of gas. In our Galaxy, it occurred on a much shorter time scale, while the chemical continuity before and after the quenching indicates that it was not due to the exhaustion of the gas. While quenching is generally associated with spheroids, our results show that it also occurs in galaxies like the Milky Way, possibly when they are undergoing a morphological transition from thick to thin disks. Given the demographics of late type galaxies in the local universe, in which classical bulges are rare, we suggest further that this may hold true generally in galaxies with mass lower than or approximately $M^*$, where quenching could be directly a consequence of thick disk formation. We emphasize that the quenching phase in the Milky Way could be contemporaneous with, and related to, the formation of the bar. We sketch a scenario on how a strong bar may inhibit star formation.
  • The morphological, spectroscopic and kinematical properties of the warm interstellar medium (wim) in early-type galaxies (ETGs) hold key observational constraints to nuclear activity and the buildup history of these massive, quiescent systems. High-quality integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data with a wide spectral and spatial coverage, such as those from the CALIFA survey, offer an unprecedented opportunity for advancing our understanding of the wim in ETGs. This article centers on a 2D investigation of the wim component in 32 nearby (<~150Mpc) ETGs from CALIFA, complementing a previous 1D analysis of the same sample (Papaderos et al. 2013; P13). We include here H\alpha\ intensity and equivalent width (EW) maps and radial profiles, diagnostic emission-line ratios, besides ionized-gas and stellar kinematics. This study is supplemented by \tau-ratio maps as an efficient means to quantify the role of photoionization by pAGB stars, as compared to other mechanisms (e.g., AGN, low-level star formation). Additionally, we extend the tentative classification proposed in P13 by the type i+, which is assigned to a subset of type i ETGs exhibiting ongoing low-level star-formation (SF) in their periphery. This finding along with faint traces of localized SF in the extranuclear component of several of our sample ETGs points to a non-negligible contribution by OB stars to the total ionizing budget. We also demonstrate that, at the typical emission-line detection threshold of ~2\AA in previous studies, most of the extranuclear wim emission in an ETG may evade detection, which could in turn prompt its classification as an entirely gas-devoid system. This study adds further observational evidence for a considerable heterogeneity among ETGs with regard to the physical properties and 2D kinematics of the wim component, and underscores the importance of IFS studies over their entire optical extent.
  • Integral field spectroscopy studies based on CALIFA data have recently revealed the presence of ongoing low-level star formation (SF) in the periphery of ~10% of local early-type galaxies (ETGs), witnessing a still ongoing inside-out galaxy growth process. A distinctive property of the nebular component in these ETGs, classified i+, is a two-radial-zone structure, with the inner zone displaying LINER emission with a H\alpha equivalent width EW~1{\AA}, and the outer one (3{\AA}<EW<~20{\AA}) showing HII-region characteristics. Using CALIFA IFS data, we empirically demonstrate that the confinement of nebular emission to the galaxy periphery leads to a strong aperture (or, redshift) bias in spectroscopic single-fiber studies of type i+ ETGs: At low redshift (<~0.45), SDSS spectroscopy is restricted to the inner (SF-devoid LINER) zone, thereby leading to their erroneous classification as "retired" galaxies (systems lacking SF and whose faint emission is powered by pAGB stars). Only at higher z's the SDSS aperture can encompass the outer SF zone, permitting their unbiased classification as "composite SF/LINER". We also demonstrate that the principal effect of a decreasing aperture on the classification of i+ ETGs via standard BPT emission-line ratios consists in a monotonic up-right shift precisely along the upper-right wing of the "seagull" distribution. Motivated by these insights, we also investigate theoretically these biases in aperture-limited studies of inside-out growing galaxies as a function of z. To this end, we devise a simple model, which involves an outwardly propagating SF process, that reproduces the radial extent and two-zone EW distribution of i+ ETGs. By simulating on this model the spectroscopic SDSS aperture, we find that SDSS studies at z<~1 are progressively restricted to the inner LINER-zone, and miss an increasingly large portion of the H\alpha-emitting periphery.
  • Based on a combined analysis of SDSS imaging and CALIFA integral field spectroscopy data, we report on the detection of faint (24 < {\mu}$_r$ mag/arcsec$^2$ < 26) star-forming spiral-arm-like features in the periphery of three nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs). These features are of considerable interest because they document the still ongoing inside-out growth of some local ETGs and may add valuable observational insight into the origin and evolution of spiral structure in triaxial stellar systems. A characteristic property of the nebular component in the studied ETGs, classified i+, is a two-radial-zone structure, with the inner zone that displays faint (EW(H\alpha)$\simeq$1{\AA}) low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER) properties, and the outer one (3{\AA}<EW(H\alpha)<~20{\AA}) HII-region characteristics. This spatial segregation of nebular emission in two physically distinct concentric zones calls for an examination of aperture effects in studies of type i+ ETGs with single-fiber spectroscopic data.
  • Most successful galaxy formation scenarios now postulate that the intense star formation in massive, high-redshift galaxies during their major growth period was truncated when powerful AGNs launched galaxy-wide outflows of gas that removed large parts of the interstellar medium. The most powerful radio galaxies at z~2 show clear signatures of such winds, but are too rare to be good representatives of a generic phase in the evolution of all massive galaxies at high redshift. Here we present SINFONI imaging spectroscopy of 12 radio galaxies at z~2 that are intermediate between the most powerful radio and vigorous starburst galaxies in radio power, and common enough to represent a generic phase in the early evolution of massive galaxies. The kinematic properties are diverse, with regular velocity gradients with amplitudes of Delta v=200-400 km s^-1 as in rotating disks as well as irregular kinematics with multiple velocity jumps of a few 100 km s^-1. Line widths are generally high, typically around FWHM=800 km s^-1, consistent with wind velocities in hydrodynamic models. A broad H-alpha line in one target implies a black hole mass of a few 10^9 M$_sun. The ratio of line widths, sigma, to bulk velocity, v, is so large that even the gas in galaxies with regular velocity fields is unlikely to be gravitationally bound. It is unclear, however, whether the large line widths are due to turbulence or unresolved, local outflows as are sometimes observed at low redshifts. Comparison of the kinetic energy with the energy supply from the AGN through jet and radiation pressure suggests that the radio source still plays a dominant role for feedback, consistent with low-redshift radio-loud quasars.
  • The build-up of galaxies is regulated by a complex interplay between gravitational collapse, galaxy merging and feedback related to AGN and star formation. The energy released by these processes has to dissipate for gas to cool, condense, and form stars. How gas cools is thus a key to understand galaxy formation. \textit{Spitzer Space Telescope} infrared spectroscopy revealed a population of galaxies with weak star formation and unusually powerful H$_2$ line emission. This is a signature of turbulent dissipation, sustained by large-scale mechanical energy injection. The cooling of the multiphase interstellar medium is associated with emission in the H$_2$ lines. These results have profound consequences on our understanding of regulation of star formation, feedback and energetics of galaxy formation in general. The fact that H$_2$ lines can be strongly enhanced in high-redshift turbulent galaxies will be of great importance for the \textit{James Webb Space Telescope} observations which will unveil the role that H$_2$ plays as a cooling agent in the era of galaxy assembly.
  • High redshift quasars can be used to trace the early growth of massive galaxies and may be triggered by galaxy-galaxy interactions. We present MUSE science verification data on one such interacting system consisting of the well-studied z=3.2 PKS1614+051 quasar, its AGN companion galaxy and bridge of material radiating in Lyalpha between the quasar and its companion. We find a total of four companion galaxies (at least two galaxies are new discoveries), three of which reside within the likely virial radius of the quasar host, suggesting that the system will evolve into a massive elliptical galaxy by the present day. The MUSE data are of sufficient quality to split the extended Lyalpha emission line into narrow velocity channels. In these the gas can be seen extending towards each of the three neighbouring galaxies suggesting that the emission-line gas originates in a gravitational interaction between the galaxies and the quasar host. The photoionization source of this gas is less clear but is probably dominated by the two AGN. The quasar's Lyalpha emission spectrum is double-peaked, likely due to absorbing neutral material at the quasar's systemic redshift with a low column density as no damping wings are present. The spectral profiles of the AGN and bridge's Lyalpha emission are also consistent with absorption at the same redshift indicating this neutral material may extend over > 50 kpc. The fact that the neutral material is seen in the line of sight to the quasar and transverse to it, and the fact that we see the quasar and it also illuminates the emission-line bridge, suggests the quasar radiates isotropically and any obscuring torus is small. These results demonstrate the power of MUSE for investigating the dynamics of interacting systems at high redshift.
  • We report the detection of extended warm ionized gas in two powerful high-redshift radio galaxies, NVSS J210626-314003 at z=2.10 and TXS 2353-003 at z=1.49, that does not appear to be associated with the radio jets. This is contrary to what would be expected from the alignment effect, a characteristic feature of distant, powerful radio galaxies at z> 0.6. The gas also has smaller velocity gradients and line widths than most other high-z radio galaxies with similar data. Both galaxies are part of a systematic study of 50 high-redshift radio galaxies with SINFONI, and are the only two that are characterized by the presence of high surface-brightness gas not associated with the jet axis and by the absence of such gas aligned with the jet. Both galaxies are spatially resolved with ISAAC broadband imaging covering the rest-frame R band, and have extended wings that cannot be attributed to line contamination. We argue that the gas and stellar properties of these galaxies are more akin to gas-rich brightest cluster galaxies in cool-core clusters than the general population of high-redshift radio galaxies at z>2. In support of this interpretation, one of our sources, TXS 2353-003, for which we have H\alpha\ narrowband imaging, is associated with an overdensity of candidate H\alpha\ emitters by a factor of 8 relative to the field at z=1.5. We discuss possible scenarios of the evolutionary state of these galaxies and the nature of their emission line gas within the context of cyclical AGN feedback.
  • We have mapped the superwind/halo region of the nearby starburst galaxy M82 in the mid-infrared with $Spitzer-IRS$. The spectral regions covered include the H$_2 S(1)-S(3)$, [NeII], [NeIII] emission lines and PAH features. We estimate the total warm H$_2$ mass and the kinetic energy of the outflowing warm molecular gas to be between $M_{warm}\sim5-17\times10^6$ M$_{\odot}$ and $E_{K}\sim6-20\times10^{53}$ erg. Using the ratios of the 6.2, 7.7 and 11.3 micron PAH features in the IRS spectra, we are able to estimate the average size and ionization state of the small grains in the superwind. There are large variations in the PAH flux ratios throughout the outflow. The 11.3/7.7 and the 6.2/7.7 PAH ratios both vary by more than a factor of five across the wind region. The Northern part of the wind has a significant population of PAH's with smaller 6.2/7.7 ratios than either the starburst disk or the Southern wind, indicating that on average, PAH emitters are larger and more ionized. The warm molecular gas to PAH flux ratios (H$_2/PAH$) are enhanced in the outflow by factors of 10-100 as compared to the starburst disk. This enhancement in the H$_2/PAH$ ratio does not seem to follow the ionization of the atomic gas (as measured with the [NeIII]/[NeII] line flux ratio) in the outflow. This suggests that much of the warm H$_2$ in the outflow is excited by shocks. The observed H$_2$ line intensities can be reproduced with low velocity shocks ($v < 40$ km s$^{-1}$) driven into moderately dense molecular gas ($10^2 <n_H < 10^4$ cm$^{-3}$) entrained in the outflow.
  • The apparent correlation between the specific star formation rate (sSFR) and total stellar mass (M_star) of galaxies is a fundamental relationship indicating how they formed their stellar populations. To attempt to understand this relation, we hypothesize that the relation and its evolution is regulated by the increase in the stellar and gas mass surface density in galaxies with redshift, which is itself governed by the angular momentum of the accreted gas, the amount of available gas, and by self-regulation of star formation. With our model, we can reproduce the specific SFR-M_star relations at z~1-2 by assuming gas fractions and gas mass surface densities similar to those observed for z=1-2 galaxies. We further argue that it is the increasing angular momentum with cosmic time that causes a decrease in the surface density of accreted gas. The gas mass surface densities in galaxies are controlled by the centrifugal support (i.e., angular momentum), and the sSFR is predicted to increase as, sSFR(z)=(1+z)^3/t_H0, as observed (where t_H0 is the Hubble time and no free parameters are necessary). At z>~2, we argue that star formation is self-regulated by high pressures generated by the intense star formation itself. The star formation intensity must be high enough to either balance the hydrostatic pressure (a rather extreme assumption) or to generate high turbulent pressure in the molecular medium which maintains galaxies near the line of instability (i.e. Toomre Q~1). The most important factor is the increase in stellar and gas mass surface density with redshift, which allows distant galaxies to maintain high levels of sSFR. Without a strong feedback from massive stars, such galaxies would likely reach very high sSFR levels, have high star formation efficiencies, and because strong feedback drives outflows, ultimately have an excess of stellar baryons (abridged).
  • We detect bright [CII]158$\mu$m line emission from the radio galaxy 3C 326N at z=0.09, which shows weak star formation ($SFR<0.07$M$_{\odot}$~yr$^{-1}$) despite having strong H$_2$ line emission and $2\times 10^9$M$_{\odot}$ of molecular gas. The [CII] line is twice as strong as the 0-0S(1) 17$\mu$m H$_2$ line, and both lines are much in excess what is expected from UV heating. We combine infrared Spitzer and Herschel data with gas and dust modeling to infer the gas physical conditions. The [CII] line traces 30 to 50% of the molecular gas mass, which is warm (70<T<100K) and at moderate densities $700<n_{H}<3000$cm$^{-3}$. The [CII] line is broad with a blue-shifted wing, and likely to be shaped by a combination of rotation, outflowing gas, and turbulence. It matches the near-infrared H$_2$ and the Na D optical absorption lines. If the wing is interpreted as an outflow, the mass loss rate would be larger than 20M$_{\odot}$/yr, and the depletion timescale shorter than the orbital timescale ($10^8$yr). These outflow rates may be over-estimated because the stochastic injection of turbulence on galactic scales can contribute to the skewness of the line profile and mimic outflowing gas. We argue that the dissipation of turbulence is the main heating process of this gas. Cosmic rays can also contribute to the heating but they require an average gas density larger than the observational constraints. We show that strong turbulent support maintains a high gas vertical scale height (0.3-4kpc) in the disk and can inhibit the formation of gravitationally-bound structures at all scales, offering a natural explanation for the weakness of star formation in 3C 326N. To conclude, the bright [CII] line indicates that strong AGN jet-driven turbulence may play a key role in enhancing the amount of molecular gas (positive feedback) but yet can prevent star formation on galactic scales (negative feedback).
  • We develop a chemical evolution model in order to study the star formation history of the Milky Way. Our model assumes that the Milky Way is formed from a closed box-like system in the inner regions, while the outer parts of the disc experience some accretion. Unlike the usual procedure, we do not fix the star formation prescription (e.g. Kennicutt law) in order to reproduce the chemical abundance trends. Instead, we fit the abundance trends with age in order to recover the star formation history of the Galaxy. Our method enables one to recover with unprecedented accuracy the star formation history of the Milky Way in the first Gyrs, in both the inner (R<7-8kpc) and outer (R>9-10kpc) discs as sampled in the solar vicinity. We show that, in the inner disc, half of the stellar mass formed during the thick disc phase, in the first 4-5 Gyr. This phase was followed by a significant dip in the star formation activity (at 8-9 Gyr) and a period of roughly constant lower level star formation for the remaining 8 Gyr. The thick disc phase has produced as many metals in 4 Gyr as the thin disc in the remaining 8 Gyr. Our results suggest that a closed box model is able to fit all the available constraints in the inner disc. A closed box system is qualitatively equivalent to a regime where the accretion rate, at high redshift, maintains a high gas fraction in the inner disc. In such conditions, the SFR is mainly governed by the high turbulence of the ISM. By z~1 it is possible that most of the accretion takes place in the outer disc, while the star formation activity in the inner disc is mostly sustained by the gas not consumed during the thick disc phase, and the continuous ejecta from earlier generations of stars. The outer disc follows a star formation history very similar to that of the inner disc, although initiated at z~2, about 2 Gyr before the onset of the thin disc formation in the inner disc.
  • By analyzing a N-body simulation of a bulge formed simply via a bar instability mechanism operating on a kinematically cold stellar disk, and by comparing the results of this analysis with the structural and kinematic properties of the main stellar populations of the Milky Way bulge, we conclude that the bulge of our Galaxy is not a pure stellar bar formed from a pre-existing thin stellar disk, as some studies have recently suggested. On the basis of several arguments emphasized in this paper, we propose that the bulge population which, in the Milky Way, is observed not to be part of the peanut structure corresponds to the old galactic thick disk, thus implying that the Milky Way is a pure thin+thick disk galaxy, with only a possible limited contribution of a classical bulge.
  • By means of idealized, dissipationless N-body simulations which follow the formation and subsequent buckling of a stellar bar, we study the characteristics of boxy/peanut-shaped bulges and compare them with the properties of the stellar populations in the Milky Way bulge. The main results of our modeling, valid for the general family of boxy/peanut shaped bulges, are the following: (i) because of the spatial redistribution in the disk initiated at the epoch of bar formation, stars from the innermost regions to the outer Lindblad resonance of the stellar bar are mapped into a boxy bulge; (ii) the contribution of stars to the local bulge density depends on their birth radius: stars born in the innermost disk tend to dominate the innermost regions of the boxy bulge, while stars originating closer to the OLR are preferentially found in the outer regions of the boxy/peanut structure; (iii) stellar birth radii are imprinted in the bulge kinematics, the larger the birth radii of stars ending up in the bulge, the greater their rotational support and the higher their line-of- sight velocity dispersions (but note that this last trend depends on the bar viewing angle); (iv) the higher the classical bulge-over-disk ratio, the larger its fractional contribution of stars at large vertical distance from the galaxy mid-plane. (ABRIDGED) On the basis of their chemical and kinematic characteristics, the results of our modeling suggests that the populations A, B and C, as defined by the ARGOS survey, can be associated, respectively, with the inner thin disk, to the young thick and to the old thick disk, following the nomenclature recently suggested for stars in the solar neighborhood by Haywood et al. (2013).
  • Identifying galaxy clustering at high redshift (i.e. z > 1) is essential to our understanding of the current cosmological model. However, at increasing redshift, clusters evolve considerably in star-formation activity and so are less likely to be identified using the widely-used red sequence method. Here we assess the viability of instead identifying high redshift clustering using actively star-forming galaxies (SMGs associated with over-densities of BzKs/LBGs). We perform both a 2- and 3-D clustering analysis to determine whether or not true (3D) clustering can be identified where only 2D data are available. As expected, we find that 2D clustering signals are weak at best and inferred results are method dependant. In our 3D analysis, we identify 12 SMGs associated with an over-density of galaxies coincident both spatially and in redshift - just 8% of SMGs with known redshifts in our sample. Where an SMG in our target fields lacks a known redshift, their sightline is no more likely to display clustering than blank sky fields; prior redshift information for the SMG is required to identify a true clustering signal. We find that the strength of clustering in the volume around typical SMGs, while identifiable, is not exceptional. However, we identify a small number of highly clustered regions, all associated with an SMG. The most notable of these, surrounding LESSJ033336.8-274401, potentially contains an SMG, a QSO and 36 star-forming galaxies (a > 20sig over-density) all at z~1.8. This region is highly likely to represent an actively star-forming cluster and illustrates the success of using star-forming galaxies to select sites of early clustering. Given the increasing number of deep fields with large volumes of spectroscopy, or high quality and reliable photometric redshifts, this opens a new avenue for cluster identification in the young Universe.
  • ABRIDGED: We have used the LABOCA Survey of the ECDF-S (LESS) to investigate rest-frame FIR emission from typical SF systems (LBGs) at redshift 3, 4, and 5. We initially concentrate on LBGs at z~3 and select three subsamples on stellar mass, extinction corrected SF and rest-frame UV-magnitude. We produce composite 870micron images of the typical source in our subsamples, obtaining ~4sigma detections and suggesting a correlation between FIR luminosity and stellar mass. We apply a similar procedure to our full samples at z~3, 4, 4.5 and 5 and do not obtain detections - consistent with a simple scaling between FIR luminosity and stellar mass. In order to constrain the FIR SED of these systems we explore their emission at multiple wavelengths spanning the peak of dust emission at z~3 using the Herschel SPIRE observations of the field. We obtain detections at multiple wavelengths for both our stellar mass and UV-magnitude selected samples, and find a best-fit SED with T_dust in the ~33-41K range. We calculate L_FIR, obscured SFRs and M_dust, and find that a significant fraction of SF in these systems is obscured. Interestingly, our extinction corrected SFR sample does not display the large FIR fluxes predicted from its red UV-spectral slope. This suggests that the method of assuming an intrinsic UV-slope and correcting for dust attenuation may be invalid for this sample - and that these are not in fact the most actively SF systems. All of our z~3 samples fall on the `main sequence' of SF galaxies at z~3 and our detected subsamples are likely to represent the high obscuration end of LBGs at their epoch. We compare the FIR properties of our subsamples with various other populations, finding that our stellar mass selected sample shows similar FIR characteristics to SMGs at the same epoch and therefore potentially represents the low L_FIR end of the high redshift FIR luminosity function.
  • We have used the SINFONI near-infrared integral field unit on the VLT to resolve the optical emission line structure of one of the brightest (L~1e44 erg/s) and nearest (z=2.38) of all Lya blobs (LABs). The target, known in the literature as object 'B1' (Francis et al. 1996), lies at a redshift where the main optical emission lines are accessible in the observed near-infrared. We detect luminous [OIII]4959,5007A and Ha emission with a spatial extent of at least 32x40 kpc (4"x5"). The dominant optical emission line component shows relatively broad lines (600-800 km/s, FWHM) and line ratios consistent with AGN-photoionization. The new evidence for AGN photoionization, combined with previously detected CIV and luminous, warm infrared emission, suggest that B1 is the site of a hidden quasar. This is confirmed by the fact that [OII] is relatively weak compared to [OIII] (extinction-corrected [OIII]/[OII] of about 3.8), which is indicative of a high, Seyfert-like ionization parameter. From the [OIII] luminosity we infer a bolometric AGN luminosity of ~3e46 erg/s, and further conclude that the obscured AGN may be Compton-thick given existing X-ray limits. The large line widths observed are consistent with clouds moving within the narrow line region of a luminous QSO. The AGN scenario is capable of producing sufficient ionizing photons to power the Lya, even in the presence of dust. By performing a census of similar objects in the literature, we find that virtually all luminous LABs harbor obscured quasars. Based on simple duty-cycle arguments, we conclude that AGN are the main drivers of the Lya in LABs rather than the gravitational heating and subsequent cooling suggested by cold stream models. We also conclude that the empirical relation between LABs and overdense environments at high redshift must be due to a more fundamental correlation between AGN (or massive galaxies) and environment.
  • (abridged) We have analyzed the properties of the rest-frame optical emission lines of a sample of 53 intensely star forming galaxies at z=1.3 to 2.7 observed with SINFONI on the ESO-VLT. We find large velocity dispersions in the lines, sigma=30-250 km/s. Our data agree well with simulations where we applied beam-smearing and assumed a scaling relation of the form: velocity dispersion is proportional to the square root of the star-formation intensity (star-formation rate per unit area). We conclude that the dispersions are primarily driven by star formation. To explain the high surface brightness and optical line ratios, high thermal pressures in the warm ionized medium, WIM, are required (log P/k (K/cm^3)>~6-7). Such thermal pressures in the WIM are similar to those observed in nearby starburst galaxies, but occur over much larger physical scales. Moreover, the relatively low ionization parameters necessary to fit the high surface brightnesses and optical line ratios suggest that the gas is not only directly associated with regions of star formation, but is wide spread throughout the general ISM. Thus the optical emission line gas is a tracer of the large scale dynamics of the bulk of the ISM. We present a simple model for the energy input from young stars in an accreting galaxy, to argue that the intense star-formation is supporting high turbulent pressure, which roughly balances the gravitational pressure and thus enables distant gas accreting disks to maintain a Toomre disk instability parameter Q~1. For a star formation efficiency of 3%, only 5-15% of the mechanical energy from young stars that is deposited in the ISM is needed to support the level of turbulence required for maintaining this balance. Since this balance is maintained by energy injected into the ISM by the young stars themselves, this suggests that star formation in high redshift galaxies is self-regulating.
  • Luminous high-redshift QSOs are thought to exist within the most massive dark matter haloes in the young Universe. As a consequence they are likely to be markers for biased, over-dense regions where early galaxies cluster, regions that eventually grow into the groups and clusters seen in the lower redshift universe. In this paper we explore the clustering of galaxies around z ~ 5 QSOs as traced by Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). We target the fields of three QSOs using the same optical imaging and spectroscopy techniques used in the ESO Remote Galaxy Survey (ERGS, Douglas et al. 2009, 2010), which was successful in identifying individual clustered structures of LBGs. We use the statistics of the redshift clustering in ERGS to show that two of the three fields show significant clustering of LBGs at the QSO redshifts. Neither of these fields is obviously over-dense in LBGs from the imaging alone; a possible reason why previous imaging-only studies of high-redshift QSO environments have given ambiguous results. This result shows that luminous QSOs at z ~ 5 are typically found in over-dense regions. The richest QSO field contains at least nine spectroscopically confirmed objects at the same redshift including the QSO itself, seven LBGs and a second fainter QSO. While this is a very strong observational signal of clustering at z ~ 5, it is of similar strength to that seen in two structures identified in the 'blank sky' ERGS fields. This indicates that, while over-dense, the QSO environments are not more extreme than other structures that can be identified at these redshifts. The three richest structures discovered in this work and in ERGS have properties consistent with that expected for proto-clusters and likely represent the early stages in the build-up of massive current-day groups and clusters.
  • We present the first public data release of the CALIFA survey. It consists of science-grade optical datacubes for the first 100 of eventually 600 nearby (0.005<z<0.03) galaxies, obtained with the integral-field spectrograph PMAS/PPak mounted on the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto observatory. The galaxies in DR1 already cover a wide range of properties in color-magnitude space, morphological type, stellar mass, and gas ionization conditions. This offers the potential to tackle a variety of open questions in galaxy evolution using spatially resolved spectroscopy. Two different spectral setups are available for each galaxy, (i) a low-resolution V500 setup covering the nominal wavelength range 3745-7500A with a spectral resolution of 6.0A (FWHM), and (ii) a medium-resolution V1200 setup covering the nominal wavelength range 3650-4840A with a spectral resolution of 2.3A (FWHM). We present the characteristics and data structure of the CALIFA datasets that should be taken into account for scientific exploitation of the data, in particular the effects of vignetting, bad pixels and spatially correlated noise. The data quality test for all 100 galaxies showed that we reach a median limiting continuum sensitivity of 1.0x10^-18erg/s/cm^2/A/arcsec^2 at 5635A and 2.2x10^-18erg/s/cm^2/A/arcsec^2 at 4500A for the V500 and V1200 setup respectively, which corresponds to limiting r and g band surface brightnesses of 23.6mag/arcsec^2 and 23.4mag/arcsec^2, or an unresolved emission-line flux detection limit of roughly 1x10^-17erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2 and 0.6x10^-17erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2, respectively. The median spatial resolution is 3.7", and the absolute spectrophotometric calibration is better than 15% (1sigma). We also describe the available interfaces and tools that allow easy access to this first public CALIFA data.
  • We report new, sensitive observations of two z ~ 3-3.5 FIR-luminous radio galaxies, 6C1909+72 and B3J2330+3927, in 12CO J=1-0 with the Karl Jansky VLA and at 100-500um using Herschel, alongside new and archival 12CO J=4-3 observations from IRAM PdBI. We introduce a new colour-colour diagnostic plot to constrain the redshifts of several distant, dusty galaxies in our target fields. A bright SMG near 6C1909+72 likely shares the same node or filament as the signpost AGN, but it is not detected in CO despite ~20,000 km/s of velocity coverage. Also in the 6C1909+72 field, a large, red dust feature spanning ~500 kpc is aligned with the radio jet. We suggest several processes by which metal-rich material may have been transported, favouring a collimated outflow reminiscent of the jet-oriented metal enrichment seen in local cluster environments. Our interferometric imaging reveals a gas-rich companion to B3J2330+3927; indeed, all bar one of the eight z >~ 2 radio galaxies (or companions) detected in CO provide some evidence that starburst activity in radio-loud AGN at high redshift is driven by the interaction of two or more gas-rich systems in which a significant mass of stars has already formed, rather than via steady accretion of cold gas from the cosmic web. We find that the CO Tb ratios in radio-loud AGN host galaxies are significantly higher than those seen in similarly intense starbursts where AGN activity is less pronounced. Our most extreme example, where L'(CO4-3)/L'(CO1-0) > 2.7, provides evidence that significant energy is being deposited rapidly into the molecular gas via X-rays and/or mechanical (`quasar-mode') feedback from the AGN, leading to a high degree of turbulence globally and a low optical depth in 12CO - feedback that may lead to the cessation of star formation on a timescale commensurate with that of the jet activity, <~10 Myr.