• The major breakthroughs in the understanding of topological materials over the past decade were all triggered by the discovery of the Z$_2$ topological insulator (TI). In three dimensions (3D), the TI is classified as either "strong" or "weak", and experimental confirmations of the strong topological insulator (STI) rapidly followed the theoretical predictions. In contrast, the weak topological insulator has so far eluded experimental verification, since the topological surface states emerge only on particular side surfaces which are typically undetectable in real 3D crystals. Here we provide experimental evidence for the WTI state in a bismuth iodide, $\beta$-Bi4I4. Significantly, the crystal has naturally cleavable top and side planes both stacked via van-der-Waals forces, which have long been desirable for the experimental realization of the WTI state. As a definitive signature of it, we find quasi-1D Dirac TSS at the side-surface (100) while the top-surface (001) is topologically dark. Furthermore, a crystal transition from the $\beta$- to $\alpha$-phase drives a topological phase transition from a nontrivial WTI to the trivial insulator around room temperature. This topological phase, viewed as quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators stacked three-dimensionally, and excellent functionality with on/off switching will lay a foundation for new technology benefiting from highly directional spin-currents with large density protected against backscattering.
  • We use bulk-sensitive soft X-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and investigate bulk electronic structures of Ce monopnictides (CeX; X=P, As, Sb and Bi). By exploiting a paradigmatic study of the band structures as a function of their spin-orbit coupling (SOC), we draw the topological phase diagram of CeX and unambiguously reveal the topological phase transition from a trivial to a nontrivial regime in going from CeP to CeBi induced by the band inversion. The underlying mechanism of the topological phase transition is elucidated in terms of SOC in concert with their semimetallic band structures. Our comprehensive observations provide a new insight into the band topology hidden in the bulk of solid states.
  • Iron-based chalcogenides are complex superconducting systems in which orbitally-dependent electronic correlations play an important role. Here, using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we investigate the effect of these electronic correlations outside the nematic phase in the tetragonal phase of superconducting FeSe1-xSx (x = 0; 0:18; 1). With increasing sulfur substitution, the Fermi velocities increase significantly and the band renormalizations are suppressed towards a factor of 1.5-2 for FeS. Furthermore, the chemical pressure leads to an increase in the size of the quasi-two dimensional Fermi surface, compared with that of FeSe, however, it remains smaller than the predicted one from first principle calculations for FeS. Our results show that the isoelectronic substitution is an effective way to tune electronic correlations in FeSe1-xSx, being weakened for FeS with a lower superconducting transition temperature. This suggests indirectly that electronic correlations could help to promote higher-Tc superconductivity in FeSe.
  • Employing a 10-orbital tight binding model, we present a new set of hopping parameters fitted directly to our latest high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data for the high temperature tetragonal phase of FeSe. Using these parameters we predict a large 10 meV shift of the chemical potential as a function of temperature. In order to confirm this large temperature dependence, we performed ARPES experiments on FeSe and observed a $\sim$25 meV rigid shift to the chemical potential between 100 K and 300 K. This unexpectedly strong shift has important implications for theoretical models of superconductivity and of nematic order in FeSe materials.
  • We investigate the evolution of the Fermi surfaces and electronic interactions across the nematic phase transition in single crystals of FeSe1-xSx using Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in high magnetic fields up to 45 tesla in the low temperature regime. The unusually small and strongly elongated Fermi surface of FeSe increases monotonically with chemical pressure, x, due to the suppression of the in-plane anisotropy except for the smallest orbit which suffers a Lifshitz-like transition once nematicity disappears. Even outside the nematic phase the Fermi surface continues to increase, in stark contrast to the reconstructed Fermi surface detected in FeSe under applied external pressure. We detect signatures of orbital-dependent quasiparticle mass renomalization suppressed for those orbits with dominant dxz=yz character, but unusually enhanced for those orbits with dominant dxy character. The lack of enhanced superconductivity outside the nematic phase in FeSe1-xSx suggest that nematicity may not play the essential role in enhancing Tc in these systems.
  • We present Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy measurements of the quasi-one dimensional superconductor K$_2$Cr$_3$As$_3$. We find that the Fermi surface contains two Fermi surface sheets, with linearly dispersing bands not displaying any significant band renormalizations. The one-dimensional band dispersions display a suppression of spectral intensity approaching the Fermi level according to a linear power law, over an energy range of ~200 meV. This is interpreted as a signature of Tomonoga-Luttinger liquid physics, which provides a new perspective on the possibly unconventional superconductivity in this family of compounds.
  • The lifting of $d_{xz}$-$d_{yz}$ orbital degeneracy is often considered a hallmark of the nematic phase of Fe-based superconductors, including FeSe, but its origin is not yet understood. Here we report a high resolution Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy study of single crystals of FeSe, accounting for the photon-energy dependence and making a detailed analysis of the temperature dependence. We find that the hole pocket undergoes a fourfold-symmetry-breaking distortion in the nematic phase below 90~K, but in contrast the changes to the electron pockets do not require fourfold symmetry-breaking. Instead, there is an additional separation of the existing $d_{xy}$ and $d_{xz/yz}$ bands - which themselves are not split within resolution. These observations lead us to propose a new scenario of "unidirectional nematic bond ordering" to describe the low-temperature electronic structure of FeSe, supported by a good agreement with 10-orbital tight binding model calculations.
  • We report a high-resolution angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy study of the evolution of the electronic structure of FeSe1-xSx single crystals. Isovalent S substitution onto the Se site constitutes a chemical pressure which subtly modifies the electronic structure of FeSe at high temperatures and induces a suppression of the tetragonal-symmetry-breaking structural transition temperature from 87K to 58K for x=0.15. With increasing S substitution, we find smaller splitting between bands with dyz and dxz orbital character and weaker anisotropic distortions of the low temperature Fermi surfaces. These effects evolve systematically as a function of both S substitution and temperature, providing strong evidence that an orbital ordering is the underlying order parameter of the structural transition in FeSe1-xSx. Finally, we detect the small inner hole pocket for x=0.12, which is pushed below the Fermi level in the orbitally-ordered low temperature Fermi surface of FeSe.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the evolution of the nematic electronic structure of FeSe using high resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), quantum oscillations in the normal state and elastoresistance measurements. Our high resolution ARPES allows us to track the Fermi surface deformation from four-fold to two-fold symmetry across the structural transition at ~87 K which is stabilized as a result of the dramatic splitting of bands associated with dxz and dyz character. The low temperature Fermi surface is that a compensated metal consisting of one hole and two electron bands and is fully determined by combining the knowledge from ARPES and quantum oscillations. A manifestation of the nematic state is the significant increase in the nematic susceptibility as approaching the structural transition that we detect from our elastoresistance measurements on FeSe. The dramatic changes in electronic structure cannot be explained by the small lattice effects and, in the absence of magnetic fluctuations above the structural transition, points clearly towards an electronically driven transition in FeSe stabilized by orbital-charge ordering.
  • Magnetoresistivity \r{ho}xx and Hall resistivity \r{ho}xy in ultra high magnetic fields up to 88T are measured down to 0.15K to clarify the multiband electronic structure in high-quality single crystals of superconducting FeSe. At low temperatures and high fields we observe quantum oscillations in both resistivity and Hall effect, confirming the multiband Fermi surface with small volumes. We propose a novel and independent approach to identify the sign of corresponding cyclotron orbit in a compensated metal from magnetotransport measurements. The observed significant differences in the relative amplitudes of the quantum oscillations between the \r{ho}xx and \r{ho}xy components, together with the positive sign of the high-field \r{ho}xy , reveal that the largest pocket should correspond to the hole band. The low-field magnetotransport data in the normal state suggest that, in addition to one hole and one almost compensated electron bands, the orthorhombic phase of FeSe exhibits an additional tiny electron pocket with a high mobility.
  • Cd3As2 is a candidate three-dimensional Dirac semi-metal which has exceedingly high mobility and non-saturating linear magnetoresistance that may be relevant for future practical applications. We report magnetotransport and tunnel diode oscillation measurements on Cd3As2, in magnetic fields up to 65 T and temperatures between 1.5K to 300K. We find the non-saturating linear magnetoresistance persist up to 65T and it is likely caused by disorder effects as it scales with the high mobility, rather than directly linked to Fermi surface changes even when approaching the quantum limit. From the observed quantum oscillations, we determine the bulk three-dimensional Fermi surface having signatures of Dirac behaviour with non-trivial Berry's phase shift, very light effective quasiparticle masses and clear deviations from the band-structure predictions. In very high fields we also detect signatures of large Zeeman spin-splitting (g~16).
  • We report the observation of the de Haas-van Alphen effect in IrTe2 measured using torque magnetometry at low temperatures down to 0.4 K and in high magnetic fields up to 33T. IrTe2 undergoes a major structural transition around 283 K due to the formation of planes of Ir and Te dimers that cut diagonally through the lattice planes, with its electronic structure predicted to change significantly from a layered system with predominantly three-dimensional character to a tilted quasi-two dimensional Fermi surface. Quantum oscillations provide direct confirmation of this unusual tilted Fermi surface and also reveal very light quasiparticle masses (less than 1 me), with no significant enhancement due to electronic correlations. We find good agreement between the angular dependence of the observed and calculated de Haas-van Alphen frequencies, taking into account the contribution of different structural domains that form while cooling IrTe2.
  • We report a high magnetic field study up to 55 T of the nearly optimally doped iron-pnictide superconductor Ca$_{10}$(Pt$_{3}$As$_{8}$) ((Fe$_{1-x}$Pt$_{x}$)$_{2}$As$_{2}$)$_{5}$ (x=0.078(6)) with a Tc 10 K using magnetic torque, tunnel diode oscillator technique and transport measurements. We determine the superconducting phase diagram, revealing an anisotropy of the irreversibility field up to a factor of 10 near Tc and signatures of multiband superconductivity. Unexpectedly, we find a spin-flop like anomaly in magnetic torque at 22 T, when the magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the ab planes, which becomes significantly more pronounced as the temperature is lowered to 0.33 K. As our superconducting sample lies well outside the antiferromagnetic region of the phase diagram, the observed field-induced transition in torque indicates a spin-flop transition not of long-range ordered moments, but of nematic-like antiferromagnetic fluctuations.
  • We report a de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillation study of the 111 iron pnictide superconductors LiFeAs with T_c ~18K and LiFeP with T_c~5K. We find that for both compounds the Fermi surface topology is in good agreement with density functional band-structure calculations and shows quasi-nested electron and hole bands. The effective masses generally show significant enhancement, up to ~3 for LiFeP and ~5 for LiFeAs. However, one hole Fermi surface in LiFeP shows a very small enhancement, as compared with its other sheets. This difference probably results from k-dependent coupling to spin fluctuations and may be the origin of the different nodal and nodeless superconducting gap structures in LiFeP and LiFeAs respectively.