• The mass function and statistics of binaries provide important diagnostics of the star formation process. Despite this importance, the mass function at low masses remains poorly known due to observational difficulties caused by the faintness of the objects. Here we report the microlensing discovery and characterization of a binary lens composed of very low-mass stars just above the hydrogen-burning limit. From the combined measurements of the Einstein radius and microlens parallax, we measure the masses of the binary components of $0.10\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$ and $0.09\pm 0.01\ M_\odot$. This discovery demonstrates that microlensing will provide a method to measure the mass function of all Galactic populations of very low mass binaries that is independent of the biases caused by the luminosity of the population.
  • Stellar activity is a potential important limitation to the detection of low mass extrasolar planets with indirect methods (RV, photometry, astrometry). In previous papers, using the Sun as a proxy, we investigated the impact of stellar activity (spots, plages, convection) on the detectability of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-type stars with RV techniques. We extend here the detectability study to the case of astrometry. We used the sunspot and plages properties recorded over one solar cycle to infer the astrometric variations that a Sun-like star seen edge-on, 10 pc away, would exhibit, if covered by such spots/bright structures. We compare the signal to the one expected from the astrometric wobble (0.3 {\mu}as) of such a star surrounded by a one Earth-mass planet in the HZ. We also briefly investigate higher levels of activity. The activity-induced astrometric signal along the equatorial plane has an amplitude of typ. less than 0.2 {\mu}as (rms=0.07 {\mu}as), smaller than the one expected from an Earth-mass planet at 1 AU. Hence, for this level of activity, the detectability is governed by the instrumental precision rather than the activity. We show that for instance a one Earth-mass planet at 1 AU would be detected with a monthly visit during less than 5 years and an instrumental precision of 0.8 {\mu}as. A level of activity 5 times higher would still allow such a detection with a precision of 0.35 {\mu}as. We conclude that astrometry is an attractive approach to search for such planets around solar type stars with most levels of stellar activity.
  • We report the detection of a Jupiter-mass planet discovered with the SOPHIE spectrograph mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Haute-Provence Observatory. The new planet orbits HD109246, a G0V star slightly more metallic than the Sun. HD109246b has a minimum mass of 0.77 MJup, an orbital period of 68 days, and an eccentricity of 0.12. It is placed in a sparsely populated region of the period distribution of extrasolar planets. We also present a correction method for the so-called seeing effect that affects the SOPHIE radial velocities. We complement this discovery announcement with a description of some calibrations that are implemented in the SOPHIE automatic reduction pipeline. These calibrations allow the derivation of the photon-noise radial velocity uncertainty and some useful stellar properties (vsini, [Fe/H], logR'HK) directly from the SOPHIE data.
  • We present new observations of a transit of the 111-day-period exoplanet HD80606b. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope and its IRAC camera on the post-cryogenic mission, we performed a 19-hour-long photometric observation of HD80606 that covers the full transit of 13-14 January 2010. We complement this photometric data by new spectroscopic observations that we simultaneously performed with SOPHIE at Haute-Provence Observatory. This provides radial velocity measurements of the first half of the transit that was previously uncovered with spectroscopy. This new data set allows the parameters of this singular planetary system to be significantly refined. We obtained a planet-to-star radius ratio R_p/R_* = 0.1001 +/- 0.0006 that is slightly lower than the one measured from previous ground observations. We detected a feature in the Spitzer light curve that could be due to a stellar spot. We also found a transit timing about 20 minutes earlier than the ephemeris prediction; this could be caused by actual TTVs due to an additional body in the system or by underestimated systematic uncertainties. The sky-projected angle between the spin-axis of HD80606 and the normal to the planetary orbital plane is found to be lambda = 42 +/- 8 degrees thanks to the fit of the Rossiter-McLaughlin anomaly. This allows scenarios with aligned spin-orbit to be definitively rejected. Over the twenty planetary systems with measured spin-orbit angles, a few of them are misaligned; this is probably the signature of two different evolution scenarios for misaligned and aligned systems, depending if they experienced or not gravitational interaction with a third body. As in the case of HD80606b, most of the planetary systems including a massive planet are tilted; this could be the signature of a separate evolution scenario for massive planets in comparison with Jupiter-mass planets.
  • Stellar activity produced by spots and plages affects the radial velocity (RV) signatures. Because even low activity stars would produce such a signal, it is crucial to determine how it influences our ability to detect small planetary signals such as those produced by Earth-mass planets in the habitable zone (HZ). In a recent paper, we investigated the impact of sunlike spots. We aim here to investigate the additional impact of plages. We used the spot and plage properties over a solar cycle to derive the RV that would be observed if the Sun was seen edge-on. The RV signal comes from the photometric contribution of spots and plages and from the attenuation of the convective blueshift in plages. We compared the RV signal with the signal that would be produced by an Earth-mass planet in the HZ. We find that the photometric contributions of spots and plages to the RV signal partially balance each other out, so that the residual signal is comparable to the spot signal. However, the plage contribution due to the convective blueshift attenuation dominates the total signal, with an amplitude over the solar cycle of about 8-10 m/s. This contribution is very strongly correlated with the Ca index on the long term, which may be a way to distinguish between stellar activity and a planet. Providing a very good temporal sampling and signal-to-noise ratio, the photometric contribution of plages and spots should not prevent detection of Earth-mass planets in the HZ. However, the convection contribution makes such a direct detection impossible, unless its effect can be corrected for by methods that still need to be found. We show that it is possible to identify the convection contribution if the sensitivity is good enough, for example, by using activity indicators.
  • Stellar spots may in some cases produce radial velocity (RV) signatures similar to those of exoplanets. To further investigate the impact of spots, we aim at studying the detectability of Earth mass planets in the habitable zone (HZ) of solar type stars, if covered by spots similar to the sunspots. We have used the Sunspots properties recorded over one solar cycle between 1993 and 2003 to build the RV curve that a solar type star seen edge-on would show, if covered by such spots with Tsun -Tspot = 550K. We also simulate the RV of such a spotted star surrounded by an Earth mass planet located in the HZ. Under present assumptions, the detection of a 1 M Earth planet located between 0.8 and 1.2 AU requires an intensive monitoring (weekly or better), during several years of low activity phasis. The temporal sampling is more crucial than the precision of the data (assuming precisions in the range [1-10] cm/s). Cooler spots may become a problem for such detections. Also, we anticipate that plages, not considered in this paper, could further complicate or even compromise the detections.
  • We report the discovery of a planetary system around HD9446, performed from radial velocity measurements secured with the spectrograph SOPHIE at the 193-cm telescope of the Haute-Provence Observatory during more than two years. At least two planets orbit this G5V, active star: HD9446b has a minimum mass of 0.7 M_Jup and a slightly eccentric orbit with a period of 30 days, whereas HD9446c has a minimum mass of 1.8 M_Jup and a circular orbit with a period of 193 days. As for most of the known multi-planet systems, the HD9446-system presents a hierarchical disposition, with a massive outer planet and a lighter inner planet.
  • (abridged) In the frame of the search for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs around early-type main-sequence stars, we present the results obtained on the early F-type star Theta Cygni. Elodie and Sophie at OHP were used to obtain the spectra. Our dedicated radial-velocity measurement method was used to monitor the star's radial velocities over five years. We also use complementary, high angular resolution and high-contrast images taken with PUEO at CFHT. We show that Theta Cygni radial velocities are quasi-periodically variable, with a ~150-day period. These variations are not due to the ~0.35-Msun stellar companion that we detected in imaging at more than 46 AU from the star. The absence of correlation between the bisector velocity span variations and the radial velocity variations for this 7 km/s vsini star, as well as other criteria indicate that the observed radial velocity variations are not due to stellar spots. The observed amplitude of the bisector velocity span variations also seems to rule out stellar pulsations. However, we observe a peak in the bisector velocity span periodogram at the same period as the one found in the radial velocity periodogram, which indicates a probable link between these radial velocity variations and the low amplitude lineshape variations which are of stellar origin. Long-period variations are not expected from this type of star to our knowledge. If a stellar origin (hence of new type) was to be confirmed for these long-period radial velocity variations, this would have several consequences on the search for planets around main-sequence stars, both in terms of observational strategy and data analysis. An alternative explanation for these variable radial velocities is the presence of at least one planet of a few Jupiter masses orbiting at less than 1 AU. (abridged)
  • Tight binaries discovered in young, nearby associations, with known distances, are ideal targets to provide dynamical mass measurements to test the physics of evolutionary models at young ages and very low masses. We report for the first time the binarity of TWA22, possible new dynamical calibrator for evolutionary models at young ages. Based on an accurate trigonometric distance (17.53 +- 0.21 pc) determination, we infer a total dynamical mass of 220 +- 21 MJup for the system. From the resolved near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy, we find an effective temperature Teff=2900+200-200 K for TWA22 A and Teff=2900+200-100 K for TWA22 B and surface gravities between 4.0 and 5.5 dex. From our photometry and a M6 +- 1 spectral type for both components, we find luminosities of log(L/Lsun)=-2.11 +- 0.13 dex and log(L/Lsun)=-2.30 +- 0.16 dex for TWA22 A and B respectively. By comparing these parameters with evolutionary models, we question the age and the multiplicity of this system. We also discuss a possible underestimation of the mass predicted by evolutionary models for young stars close to the substellar boundary.
  • We report the detection of the primary transit of the extra-solar planet HD 80606 b, thanks to photometric and spectroscopic observations performed at Observatoire de Haute-Provence, simultaneously with the CCD camera at the 120-cm telescope and the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 193-cm telescope. We observed the whole egress of the transit and partially its central part, in both data sets with the same timings. The ingress occurred before sunset and was not observed. The full duration of the transit was between 9.5 and 17.2 hours. The data allows the planetary radius to be measured (Rp = 0.9 +- 0.1 RJup) and other parameters of the system to be refined. Radial velocity measurements show the detection of a prograde Rossiter-McLaughlin effect, and provide a hint for a spin-orbit misalignment. If confirmed, this misalignment would corroborate the hypothesis that HD 80606 b owes its unusual orbital configuration to Kozai migration. HD 80606 b is by far the transiting planet on the longest period detected today. Its unusually small radius reinforces the observed relationship between the planet radius and the incident flux received from the star and opens new questions for theory. Orbiting a quite bright star (V=9), it opens opportunities to numerous follow-up studies.
  • Extra-solar planet search programs require high-precision velocity measurements. They need to study how to disentangle radial-velocity variations due to Doppler motion from the noise induced by stellar activity. We monitored the active K2V star HD 189733 and its transiting planetary companion that has a 2.2-day orbital period. We used the high-resolution spectograph SOPHIE mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence to obtain 55 spectra of HD 189733 over nearly two months. We refined the HD 189733b orbit parameters and put limits on the eccentricity and on a long-term velocity gradient. After subtracting the orbital motion of the planet, we compared the variability of spectroscopic activity indices to the evolution of the radial-velocity residuals and the shape of spectral lines. The radial velocity, the spectral-line profile and the activity indices measured in HeI (5875.62 \AA), Halpha (6562.81 \AA) and the CaII H&K lines (3968.47 \AA and 3933.66 \AA, respectively) show a periodicity around the stellar rotation period and the correlations between them are consistent with a spotted stellar surface in rotation. We used such correlations to correct for the radial-velocity jitter due to stellar activity. This results in achieving high precision on the orbit parameters, with a semi-amplitude K = 200.56 \pm 0.88 m.s-1 and a derived planet mass of M_{P}=1.13 \pm 0.03 M$_{Jup}$.
  • (Abridged) Aims: Systematic surveys to search for exoplanets have been mostly dedicated to solar-type stars sofar. We developed in 2004 a method to extend such searches to earlier A-F type dwarfs and started spectroscopic surveys to search for planets and quantify the detection limit achievable when taking into account the stars properties and their actual levels of intrinsic variations. We give here the first results of our southern survey with HARPS. Results: 1) 64% of the 170 stars with enough data points are found to be variable. 20 are found to be binaries or candidate binaries (with stars or brown dwarfs). More than 80% or the latest type stars (once binaries are removed) are intrinsically variable at a 2 m/s precision level. Stars with earlier spectral type (B-V <= 0.2) are either variable or associated to levels of uncertainties comparable to the RV rms observed on variable stars of same B-V. 2) We have detected one long-period planetary system around an F6IV-V star. 3) We have quantified the jitter due to stellar activity and we show that taking into account this jitter in addition to the stellar parameters, it is still possible to detect planets with HARPS with periods of 3 days (resp. 10 days and 100 days) on 91% (resp. 83%, 61%) of them. We show that even the earliest spectral type stars are accessible to this type of search, provided they have a low vsini and low levels of activity. 4) Taking into account the present data, we compute the actually achieved detection limits for 107 targets and discuss the limits as a function of B-V. Given the data at hand, our survey is sensitive to short-period (few days) planets and to longer ones (100 days) at a lower extent (latest type stars). We derive first constrains on the presence of planets around A-F stars for these ranges of periods.
  • Aims: In the frame of the search for extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs around early-type stars, we present the results obtained for the F-type main-sequence star HD 60532 (F6V) with HARPS. Methods: Using 147 spectra obtained with HARPS at La Silla on a time baseline of two years, we study the radial velocities of this star. Results: HD 60532 radial velocities are periodically variable, and the variations have a Keplerian origin. This star is surrounded by a planetary system of two planets with minimum masses of 1 and 2.5 Mjup and orbital separations of 0.76 and 1.58 AU respectively. We also detect high-frequency, low-amplitude (10 m/s peak-to-peak) pulsations. Dynamical studies of the system point toward a possible 3:1 mean-motion resonance which should be confirmed within the next decade.
  • High-precision interferometric observations of six early-type main sequence stars known to harbour cold debris discs have been obtained in the near-infrared K band with the FLUOR instrument at the CHARA Array. The measured squared visibilities are compared to the expected visibility of the stellar photospheres based on theoretical photospheric models taking into account rotational distortion, searching for potential visibility reduction at short baselines due to circumstellar emission. Our observations bring to light the presence of resolved circumstellar emission around one of the six target stars (zeta Aql) at the 5 sigma level. The morphology of the emission source cannot be directly constrained because of the sparse spatial frequency sampling of our interferometric data. Using complementary adaptive optics observations and radial velocity measurements, we find that the presence of a low-mass companion is a likely origin for the excess emission. The potential companion has a K-band contrast of four magnitudes, a most probable mass of about 0.6 Msun, and is expected to orbit between about 5.5 AU and 8 AU from its host star assuming a purely circular orbit. Nevertheless, by adjusting a physical debris disc model to the observed Spectral Energy Distribution of the zeta Aql system, we also show that the presence of hot dust within 10 AU from zeta Aql, producing a total thermal emission equal to 1.69 +- 0.31% of the photospheric flux in the K band, is another viable explanation for the observed near-infrared excess. Our re-interpretation of archival near- to far-infrared photometric measurements shows however that cold dust is not present around zeta Aql at the sensitivity limit of the IRS and MIPS instruments onboard Spitzer, and urges us to remove zeta Aql from the category of bona fide debris disc stars.
  • The transiting extrasolar planet XO-3b is remarkable, with a high mass and eccentric orbit. The unusual characteristics make it interesting to test whether its orbital plane is parallel to the equator of its host star, as it is observed for other transiting planets. We performed radial velocity measurements of XO-3 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93-m telescope of Haute-Provence Observatory during a planetary transit, and at other orbital phases. This allowed us to observe the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and, together with a new analysis of the transit light curve, to refine the parameters of the planet. The unusual shape of the radial velocity anomaly during the transit provides a hint for a nearly transverse Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The sky-projected angle between the planetary orbital axis and the stellar rotation axis should be lambda = 70 +/- 15 degrees to be compatible with our observations. This suggests that some close-in planets might result from gravitational interaction between planets and/or stars rather than migration due to interaction with the accretion disk. This surprising result requires confirmation by additional observations, especially at lower airmass, to fully exclude the possibility that the signal is due to systematic effects.
  • We present the detection of a 0.47 Jupiter mass planet in a 44-day period eccentric trajectory (e=0.39) orbiting the metal-rich star HD45652. This planet, the seventh giant planet discovered in the context of the ELODIE metallicity-biased planet search program, is also confirmed using higher precision radial-velocities obtained with the CORALIE and SOPHIE spectrographs. The orbital period of HD45652b places it in the middle of the "gap" in the period distribution of extra-solar planets.
  • In this paper, we report a refined determination of the orbital parameters and the detection of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect of the recently discovered transiting exoplanet HD147506b (HAT-P-2b). The large orbital eccentricity at the short orbital period of this exoplanet is unexpected and is distinguishing from other known transiting exoplanets. We performed high-precision radial velocity spectroscopic observations of HD147506 (HAT-P-2) with the new spectrograph SOPHIE, mounted on the 1.93 m telescope at the Haute-Provence observatory (OHP). We obtained 63 new measurements, including 35 on May 14 and 20 on June 11, when the planet was transiting its parent star. The radial velocity (RV) anomaly observed illustrates that HAT-P-2b orbital motion is set in the same direction as its parent star spin. The sky-projected angle between the normal of the orbital plane and the stellar spin axis, \lambda = 0.2 +12.2 -12.5 deg, is consistent with zero. The planetary and stellar radii were re-determined, yielding R_p = 0.951 +0.039 -0.053 R_Jup, R_s = 1.416 +0.040 -0.062 R_Sun. The mass M_p = 8.62 +0.39 -0.55 M_Jup and radius of HAT-P-2b indicate a density of 12.5 +2.6 -3.6 g cm^{-3}, suggesting an object in between the known close-in planets with typical density of the order of 1 g cm^{-3}, and the very low-mass stars, with density greater than 50 g cm^{-3}.
  • We report here the discovery of two planet candidates as a result of our planet-search programme biased in favour of high-metallicity stars, using the ELODIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. One of them has a minimum mass m_2\sin{i} = 2.5 M_Jup and is orbiting the metal-rich star HD43691 with period P = 40 days and eccentricity e = 0.14. The other planet has a minimum mass m_2\sin{i} = 5.6 M_Jup and orbits the slightly metal-rich star HD132406 with period P = 974 days and eccentricity e = 0.34. Both stars were followed up with additional observations using the new SOPHIE spectrograph that replaces the ELODIE instrument, allowing an improved orbital solution for the systems.
  • In the favoured core-accretion model of formation of planetary systems, solid planetesimals accumulate to build up planetary cores, which then accrete nebular gas if they are sufficiently massive. Around M-dwarf stars (the most common stars in our Galaxy), this model favours the formation of Earth-mass to Neptune-mass planets with orbital radii of 1 to 10 astronomical units (AU), which is consistent with the small number of gas giant planets known to orbit M-dwarf host stars. More than 170 extrasolar planets have been discovered with a wide range of masses and orbital periods, but planets of Neptune's mass or less have not hitherto been detected at separations of more than 0.15 AU from normal stars. Here we report the discovery of a 5.5 (+5.5/-2.7) M_earth planetary companion at a separation of 2.6 (+1.5/-0.6) AU from a 0.22 (+0.21/-0.11) M_solar M-dwarf star. (We propose to name it OGLE-2005-BLG-390Lb, indicating a planetary mass companion to the lens star of the microlensing event.) The mass is lower than that of GJ876d, although the error bars overlap. Our detection suggests that such cool, sub-Neptune-mass planets may be more common than gas giant planets, as predicted by the core accretion theory.