• The recent discovery of topology-protected charge transport of ultimate thinness on surfaces of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) are breaking new ground in fundamental quantum science and transformative technology. Yet a challenge remains on how to isolate and disentangle helical spin transport on the surface from bulk conduction. Here we show that selective midinfrared femtosecond photoexcitation of exclusive intraband electronic transitions at low temperature underpins topological enhancement of terahertz (THz) surface transport in doped Bi2Se3, with no complication from interband excitations or need for controlled doping. The unique, hot electron state is characterized by conserved populations of surface/bulk bands and by frequency-dependent hot carrier cooling times that directly distinguish the faster surface channel than the bulk. We determine the topological enhancement ratio between bulk and surface scattering rates, i.e., $\gamma_\text{BS}/\gamma_\text{SS}\sim$3.80 in equilibrium. These behaviors are absent at elevated lattice temperatures and for high pumpphoton frequencies and uences. The selective, mid-infrared-induced THz conductivity provides a new paradigm to characterize TIs and may apply to emerging topological semimetals in order to separate the transport connected with the Weyl nodes from other bulk bands.
  • Intense, single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses offer a promising approach for understanding and controlling the properties of a material on an ultrafast time scale. In particular, resonantly exciting phonons leads to a better understanding of how they couple to other degrees of freedom in the material (e.g., ferroelectricity, conductivity and magnetism) while enabling coherent control of lattice vibrations and the symmetry changes associated with them. However, an ultrafast method for observing the resulting structural changes at the atomic scale is essential for studying phonon dynamics. A simple approach for doing this is optical second harmonic generation (SHG), a technique with remarkable sensitivity to crystalline symmetry in the bulk of a material as well as at surfaces and interfaces. This makes SHG an ideal method for probing phonon dynamics in topological insulators (TI), materials with unique surface transport properties. Here, we resonantly excite a polar phonon mode in the canonical TI Bi$_2$Se$_3$ with intense THz pulses and probe the subsequent response with SHG. This enables us to separate the photoinduced lattice dynamics at the surface from transient inversion symmetry breaking in the bulk. Furthermore, we coherently control the phonon oscillations by varying the time delay between a pair of driving THz pulses. Our work thus demonstrates a versatile, table-top tool for probing and controlling ultrafast phonon dynamics in materials, particularly at surfaces and interfaces, such as that between a TI and a magnetic material, where exotic new states of matter are predicted to exist.
  • Transient four-wave mixing studies of bulk GaAs under conditions of broad bandwidth excitation of primarily interband transitions have enabled four-particle correlations tied to degenerate (exciton-exciton) and nondegenerate (exciton-carrier) interactions to be studied. Real two-dimensional Fourier-transform spectroscopy (2DFTS) spectra reveal a complex response at the heavy-hole exciton emission energy that varies with the absorption energy, ranging from dispersive on the diagonal, through absorptive for low-energy interband transitions to dispersive with the opposite sign for interband transitions high above band gap. Simulations using a multilevel model augmented by many-body effects provide excellent agreement with the 2DFTS experiments and indicate that excitation-induced dephasing (EID) and excitation-induced shift (EIS) affect degenerate and nondegenerate interactions equivalently, with stronger exciton-carrier coupling relative to exciton-exciton coupling by approximately an order of magnitude. These simulations also indicate that EID effects are three times stronger than EIS in contributing to the coherent response of the semiconductor.
  • We report ultrafast transient-grating measurements, above and below the Curie temperature, of the dilute ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As containing 6% Mn. At 80 K (15 K), we observe that photoexcited electrons in the conduction band have a lifetime of 8 ps (5 ps) and diffuse at about 70 cm2/s (60 cm2/s). Such rapid diffusion requires either an electronic mobility exceeding 7,700 cm2/Vs or a conduction-band effective mass less than half the GaAs value. Our data suggest that neither the scattering rate nor the effective mass of the (Ga,Mn)As conduction band differs significantly from that of GaAs.
  • Although we seriously disagree with many of the points raised in the comment by Edmonds et al., we feel that it is valuable and timely, since comparison of this comment and our paper serves to underscore an important property of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As in thin film form.
  • The ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As has emerged as the most studied material for prototype applications in semiconductor spintronics. Because ferromagnetism in (Ga,Mn)As is hole-mediated, the nature of the hole states has direct and crucial bearing on its Curie temperature TC. It is vigorously debated, however, whether holes in (Ga,Mn)As reside in the valence band or in an impurity band. In this paper we combine results of channeling experiments, which measure the concentrations both of Mn ions and of holes relevant to the ferromagnetic order, with magnetization, transport, and magneto-optical data to address this issue. Taken together, these measurements provide strong evidence that it is the location of the Fermi level within the impurity band that determines TC through determining the degree of hole localization. This finding differs drastically from the often accepted view that TC is controlled by valence band holes, thus opening new avenues for achieving higher values of TC.
  • We present a unified interpretation of experimentally observed magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) in the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As, based on theoretical arguments, which demonstrates that MCD in this material arises primarily from a difference in the density of spin-up and spin-down states in the valence band brought about by the presence of the Mn impurity band, rather than being primarily due to the Zeeman splitting of electronic states.
  • The magneto-optical inter-polarization conversions by a layer of quantum dots have been investigated. Various types of polarization response of the sample were observed as a function of external magnetic field and of the orientation of the sample. The full set of experimental dependences is analyzed in terms of a one-step and a two-step model of spin evolution. The angular distribution of the quantum dots over the directions of elongation in the plane of the sample is taken into account in terms of the two models, and the model predictions are compared with experimental observations.
  • We have used polarized neutron reflectometry to study the structural and magnetic properties of the individual layers in a series of (Al,Be,Ga)As/(Ga,Mn)As/GaAs/(Ga,Mn)As multilayer samples. Structurally, we observe that the samples are virtually identical except for the GaAs spacer thickness (which varies from 3-12 nm), and confirm that the spacers contain little or no Mn. Magnetically, we observe that for the sample with the thickest spacer layer, modulation doping by the(Al,Be,Ga)As results in (Ga,Mn)As layers with very different temperature dependent magnetizations. However, as the spacer layer thickness is reduced, the temperature dependent magnetizations of the top an bottom (Ga,Mn)As layers become progressively more similar - a trend we find to be independent of the crystallographic direction along which spins are magnetized. These results definitively show that (Ga,Mn)As layers can couple across a non-magnetic spacer, and that such coupling depends on spacer thickness.
  • We report the observation of negative magnetoresistance in the ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs at low temperatures ($T<3$ K) and low magnetic fields ($0< B <20$ mT). We attribute this effect to weak localization. Observation of weak localization provides a strong evidence of impurity band transport in these materials, since for valence band transport one expects either weak anti-localization due to strong spin-orbit interactions or total suppression of interference by intrinsic magnetization. In addition to the weak localization, we observe Altshuler-Aronov electron-electron interactions effect in this material.
  • We have used complementary neutron and x-ray reflectivity techniques to examine the depth profiles of a series of as-grown and annealed Ga[1-x]Mn[x]As thin films. A magnetization gradient is observed for two as-grown films and originates from a nonuniformity of Mn at interstitial sites, and not from local variations in Mn at Ga sites. Furthermore, we see that the depth-dependent magnetization can vary drastically among as-grown Ga[1-x]Mn[x]As films despite being deposited under seemingly similar conditions. These results imply that the depth profile of interstitial Mn is dependent not only on annealing, but is also extremely sensitive to initial growth conditions. We observe that annealing improves the magnetization by producing a surface layer that is rich in Mn and O, indicating that the interstitial Mn migrates to the surface. Finally, we expand upon our previous neutron reflectivity study of Ga[1-x]Mn[x]As, by showing how the depth profile of the chemical composition at the surface and through the film thickness is directly responsible for the complex magnetization profiles observed in both as-grown and annealed films.
  • We present a comprehensive study of the reversal process of perpendicular magnetization in thin layers of the ferromagnetic semiconductor Ga1-xMnxAs. For this investigation we have purposely chosen Ga1-xMnxAs with a low Mn concentration (x ~ 0.02), since in such specimens contributions of cubic and uniaxial anisotropy parameters are comparable, allowing us to identify the role of both types of anisotropy in the magnetic reversal process. As a first step we have systematically mapped out the angular dependence of ferromagnetic resonance in thin Ga1-xMnxAs layers, which is a highly effective tool for obtaining the magnetic anisotropy parameters of the material. The process of perpendicular magnetization reversal was then studied by magneto-transport (i.e., Hall effect and planar Hall effect measurements). These measurements enable us to observe coherent spin rotation and non-coherent spin switching between the (100) and (010) planes. A model is proposed to explain the observed multi-step spin switching. The agreement of the model with experiment indicates that it can be reliably used for determining magnetic anisotropy parameters from magneto-transport data. An interesting characteristic of perpendicular magnetization reversal in Ga1-xMnxAs with low x is the appearance of a double hysteresis loops in the magnetization data. This double-loop behavior can be understood by generalizing the proposed model to include the processes of domain nucleation and expansion.
  • We present a time-resolved optical study of the dynamics of carriers and phonons in Ga_{1-x}Mn_{x}As layers for a series of Mn and hole concentrations. While band filling is the dominant effect in transient optical absorption in low-temperature-grown (LT) GaAs, band gap renormalization effects become important with increasing Mn concentration in Ga_{1-x}Mn_{x}As, as inferred from the sign of the absorption change. We also report direct observation on lattice vibrations in Ga1-xMnxAs layers via reflective electro-optic sampling technique. The data show increasingly fast dephasing of LO phonon oscillations for samples with increasing Mn and hole concentration, which can be understood in term of phonon scattering by the holes.
  • We study spin dynamics of excitons confined in self-assembled CdSe quantum dots by means of optical orientation in magnetic field. At zero field the exciton emission from QDs populated via LO phonon-assisted absorption shows a circular polarization of 14%. The polarization degree of the excitonic emission increases dramatically when a magnetic field is applied. Using a simple model, we extract the exciton spin relaxation times of 100 ps and 2.2 ns in the absence and presence of magnetic field, respectively. With increasing temperature the polarization of the QD emission gradually decreases. Remarkably, the activation energy which describes this decay is independent of the external magnetic field, and, therefore, of the degeneracy of the exciton levels in QDs. This observation implies that the temperature-induced enhancement of the exciton spin relaxation is insensitive to the energy level degeneracy and can be attributed to the same excited state distribution.
  • Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is used to study magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs in a series of Ga$_{1 - x}$Mn$_{x}$As/Ga$_{1 - y}$Al$_{y}$As heterostructures modulation-doped by Be. The FMR experiments provide a direct measure of cubic and uniaxial magnetic anisotropy fields, and their dependence on the doping level. It is found that the increase in doping -- in addition to rising the Curie temperature of the Ga$_{1 - x}$Mn$_{x}$As layers -- also leads to a very significant increase of their uniaxial anisotropy field. The FMR measurements further show that the effective $g$-factor of Ga$_{1 - x}$Mn$_{x}$As is also strongly affected by the doping. This in turn provides a direct measure of the contribution from the free hole magnetization to the magnetization of Ga$_{1 - x}$Mn$_{x}$As system as a whole.
  • We show that two major carrier excitation mechanisms are present in II-VI self-assembled quantum dots. The first one is related to direct excited state - ground state transition. It manifests itself by the presence of sharp and intense lines in the excitation spectrum measured from single quantum dots. Apart from these lines, we also observe up to four much broader excitation lines. The energy spacing between these lines indicates that they are associated with absorption related to longitudinal optical phonons. By analyzing resonantly excited photoluminescence spectra, we are able to separate the contributions from these two mechanisms. In the case of CdTe dots, the excited state - ground state relaxation is important for all dots in ensemble, while phonon - assisted processes are dominant for the dots with smaller lateral size.
  • Using micro- and nano-scale resonantly excited PL and PLE, we study the excitonic structure of CdSe/ZnSe and CdTe/ZnTe self assembled quantum dots (SAQD). Strong resonantly enhanced PL is seen at one to four optic phonon energies below the laser excitation energy. The maximum enhancement is not just one phonon energy above the peak energy distribution of QDs, but rather is 50 meV (for CdSe dots) or 100 meV (for CdTe) above the peak distribution. We interpret this unusual result as from double resonances associated with excited state to ground state energies being commensurate with LO phonons. Such a situation appears to occur only for the high-energy quantum dots.
  • We study the excitonic structure of CdSe/ZnSe self assembled quantum dots (SAQD) by magneto-photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Using fixed 200 nm apertures through a metal film, we are able to probe single narrow (200 micro-eV) spectroscopic lines emitted from CdSe quantum dots at 2K. Using linear polarization analysis of these lines, we find that approximately half of the quantum dots are elliptically elongated along the [110] direction. The other half of the QDs are symmetric, with emission lines which are completely unpolarized at zero field and exhibit no doublet structure. Using an applied magnetic field, we obtain the diamagnetic shift and the g-factor for several symmetric dots and find that the variation from dot to dot is random, with no systematic dependence with emission energy. In addition, we find no correlation between the diamagnetic shift and the g-factor.
  • In this paper, we demonstrate external control over the magnetization direction in ferromagnetic (FM) In_{1-x}Mn_{x}As/GaSb heterostructures. FM ordering with T_C as high as 50 K is confirmed by SQUID magnetization, anomalous Hall effect (AHE), and magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) measurements. Even though tensile strain is known to favor an easy axis normal to the layer plane, at low temperatures we observe that the magnetization direction in several samples is intermediate between the normal and in-plane axes. As the temperature increases, however, the easy axis rotates to the direction normal to the plane. We further demonstrate that the easy magnetization axis can be controlled by incident light through a bolometric effect, which induces a pronounced increase in the amplitude of the AHE. A mean-field-theory model for the carrier-mediated ferromagnetism reproduces the tendency for dramatic reorientations of the magnetization axis, but not the specific sensitivity to small temperature variations.
  • We discuss a new narrow-gap ferromagnetic (FM) semiconductor alloy, In(1-x)Mn(x)Sb, and its growth by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy. The magnetic properties were investigated by direct magnetization measurements, electrical transport, magnetic circular dichroism, and the magneto-optical Kerr effect. These data clearly indicate that In(1-x)Mn(x)Sb possesses all the attributes of a system with carrier-mediated FM interactions, including well-defined hysteresis loops, a cusp in the temperature dependence of the resistivity, strong negative magnetoresistance, and a large anomalous Hall effect. The Curie temperatures in samples investigated thus far range up to 8.5 K, which are consistent with a mean-field-theory simulation of the carrier-induced ferromagnetism based on the 8-band effective band-orbital method.
  • The effect of modulation doping by Be on the ferromagnetic properties of Ga(1-x)Mn(x)As is investigated in Ga(1-x)Mn(x)As/Ga(1-y)Al(y)As heterojunctions and quantum wells. Introducing Be acceptors into the Ga(1-y)Al(y)As barriers leads to an increase of the Curie temperature T_C of Ga(1-x)Mn(x)As, from 70 K in undoped structures to over 100 K with the modulation doping. This increase is qualitatively consistent with a multi-band mean field theory simulation of carrier-mediated ferromagnetism. An important feature is that the increase of T_C occurs only in those structures where the modulation doping is introduced after the deposition of the magnetic layer, but not when the Be-doped layer is grown first. This behavior is expected from the strong sensitivity of Mn interstitial formation to the value of the Fermi energy during growth.
  • We provide experimental evidence that the upper limit of ~110 K commonly observed for the Curie temperature T_C of Ga(1-x)Mn(x)As is caused by the Fermi-level-induced hole saturation. Ion channeling, electrical and magnetization measurements on a series of Ga(1-x-y)Mn(x)Be(y)As layers show a dramatic increase of the concentration of Mn interstitials accompanied by a reduction of T_C with increasing Be concentration, while the free hole concentration remains relatively constant at ~5x10^20 cm^-3. These results indicate that the concentrations of free holes and ferromagnetically active Mn spins are governed by the position of the Fermi level, which controls the formation energy of compensating interstitial Mn donors.
  • A narrow-gap ferromagnetic In(1-x)Mn(x)Sb semiconductor alloy was successfully grown by low-temperature molecular beam epitaxy on CdTe/GaAs hybrid substrates. Ferromagnetic order in In(1-x)Mn(x)Sb was unambiguously established by the observation of clear hysteresis loops both in direct magnetization measurements and in the anomalous Hall effect, with Curie temperatures T_C ranging up to 8.5 K. The observed values of T_C agree well with the existing models of carrier-induced ferromagnetism.