• A one-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation tracks a fast magnetosonic shock over time scales comparable to an inverse ion gyrofrequency. The magnetic pressure is comparable to the thermal pressure upstream. The shock propagates across a uniform background magnetic field with a pressure that equals the thermal pressure upstream at the angle 85$^\circ$ at a speed that is 1.5 times the fast magnetosonic speed in the electromagnetic limit. Electrostatic contributions to the wave dispersion increase its phase speed at large wave numbers, which leads to a convex dispersion curve. A fast magnetosonic precursor forms ahead of the shock with a phase speed that exceeds the fast magnetosonic speed by about $\sim 30 \%$. The wave is slower than the shock and hence it is damped.
  • The thin-shell instability has been named as one process, which can generate entangled structures in astrophysical plasma on collisional (fluid) scales. It is driven by a spatially varying imbalance between the ram pressure of the inflowing upstream plasma and the downstream's thermal pressure at a non-planar shock. Here we show by means of a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation that an analogue process can destabilize a thin shell formed by two interpenetrating, unmagnetized and collisionless plasma clouds. The amplitude of the shell's spatial modulation grows and saturates after about ten inverse proton plasma frequencies, when the shell consists of connected piecewise linear patches.
  • The generation of ultra-relativistic positron beams with short duration ($\tau_{e^+} \leq 30$ fs), small divergence ($\theta_{e^+} \simeq 3$ mrad), and high density ($n_{e^+} \simeq 10^{14} - 10^{15}$ cm$^{-3}$) from a fully optical setup is reported. The detected positron beam propagates with a high-density electron beam and $\gamma$-rays of similar spectral shape and peak energy, thus closely resembling the structure of an astrophysical leptonic jet. It is envisaged that this experimental evidence, besides the intrinsic relevance to laser-driven particle acceleration, may open the pathway for the small-scale study of astrophysical leptonic jets in the laboratory.
  • The dynamics of magnetic fields with amplitude of several tens of Megagauss, generated at both sides of a solid target irradiated with a high intensity (? 1019W/cm2) picosecond laser pulse, has been spatially and temporally resolved using a proton imaging technique. The amplitude of the magnetic fields is sufficiently large to have a constraining effect on the radial expansion of the plasma sheath at the target surfaces. These results, supported by numerical simulations and simple analytical modeling, may have implications for ion acceleration driven by the plasma sheath at the rear side of the target as well as for the laboratory study of self-collimated high-energy plasma jets.
  • The growth and saturation of Buneman-type instabilities is examined with a particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation for parameters that are representative for the foreshock region of fast supernova remnant (SNR) shocks. A dense ion beam and the electrons correspond to the upstream plasma and a fast ion beam to the shock-reflected ions. The purpose of the 2D simulation is to identify the nonlinear saturation mechanisms, the electron heating and potential secondary instabilities that arise from anisotropic electron heating and result in the growth of magnetic fields. We confirm that the instabilities between both ion beams and the electrons saturate by the formation of phase space holes by the beam-aligned modes. The slower oblique modes accelerate some electrons, but they can not heat up the electrons significantly before they are trapped by the faster beam-aligned modes. Two circular electron velocity distributions develop, which are centred around the velocity of each ion beam. They develop due to the scattering of the electrons by the electrostatic wave potentials. The growth of magnetic fields is observed, but their amplitude remains low.
  • The expansion of an initially unmagnetized planar rarefaction wave has recently been shown to trigger a thermal anisotropy-driven Weibel instability (TAWI), which can generate magnetic fields from noise levels. It is examined here if the TAWI can also grow in a curved rarefaction wave. The expansion of an initially unmagnetized circular plasma cloud, which consists of protons and hot electrons, into a vacuum is modelled for this purpose with a two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is shown that the momentum transfer from the electrons to the radially accelerating protons can indeed trigger a TAWI. Radial current channels form and the aperiodic growth of a magnetowave is observed, which has a magnetic field that is oriented orthogonal to the simulation plane. The induced electric field implies that the electron density gradient is no longer parallel to the electric field. Evidence is presented here for that this electric field modification triggers a second magnetic instability, which results in a rotational low-frequency magnetowave. The relevance of the TAWI is discussed for the growth of small-scale magnetic fields in astrophysical environments, which are needed to explain the electromagnetic emissions by astrophysical jets. It is outlined how this instability could be examined experimentally.
  • The expansion of a dense plasma through a more rarefied ionised medium is a phenomenon of interest in various physics environments ranging from astrophysics to high energy density laser- matter laboratory experiments. Here this situation is modeled via a 1D Particle-In-Cell simulation; a jump in the plasma density of a factor of 100 is introduced in the middle of an otherwise equally dense electron-proton plasma with an uniform proton and electron temperature of 10eV and 1keV respectively. The diffusion of the dense plasma, through the rarified one, triggers the onset of different nonlinear phenomena such as a strong ion-acoustic shock wave and a rarefaction wave. Secondary structures are detected, some of which are driven by a drift instability of the rarefaction wave. Efficient proton acceleration occurs ahead of the shock, bringing the maximum proton velocity up to 60 times the initial ion thermal speed.
  • A 2D particle simulation models the collision of two electron-ion plasma clouds along a quasi-parallel magnetic field. The collision speed is 0.9c and the density ratio 10. A current sheet forms at the front of the dense cloud, in which the electrons and the magnetic field reach energy equipartition with the ions. A structure composed of a solenoidal and a toroidal magnetic field grows in this sheet. It resembles that in the cross-section of the torus of a force-free spheromak, which may provide the coherent magnetic fields in gamma-ray burst (GRB) jets needed for their prompt emissions.
  • The direct observation and full characterization of a Phase Space Electron Hole (EH) generated by laser-matter interaction is presented. This structure has been detected via proton radiography during the interaction between an intense laser pulse (t=1ns temporally flat-top, I= 10^14W/cm^2) and a gold 26 micron thick hohlraum. This technique has allowed us the simultaneous detection of propagation velocity, potential and electron density spatial profile across the EH with fine spatial and temporal resolution providing an unprecedentedly detailed experimental characterization.
  • Supernova remnant (SNR) blast shells can reach the flow speed $v_s = 0.1 c$ and shocks form at its front. Instabilities driven by shock-reflected ion beams heat the plasma in the foreshock, which may inject particles into diffusive acceleration. The ion beams can have the speed $v_b \approx v_s$. For $v_b \ll v_s$ the Buneman or upper-hybrid instabilities dominate, while for $v_b \gg v_s$ the filamentation and mixed modes grow faster. Here the relevant waves for $v_b \approx v_s$ are examined and how they interact nonlinearly with the particles. The collision of two plasma clouds at the speed $v_s$ is modelled with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, which convect with them magnetic fields oriented perpendicular to their flow velocity vector. One simulation models equally dense clouds and the other one uses a density ratio of 2. Both simulations show upper-hybrid waves that are planar over large spatial intervals and that accelerate electrons to $\sim$ 10 keV. The symmetric collision yields only short oscillatory wave pulses, while the asymmetric collision also produces large-scale electric fields, probably through a magnetic pressure gradient. The large-scale fields destroy the electron phase space holes and they accelerate the ions, which facilitates the formation of a precursor shock.
  • We investigate the nonlinear interaction between two laser beams in a plasma in the weakly nonlinear and relativistic regime. The evolution of the laser beams is governed by two nonlinear Schroedinger equations that are coupled with the slow plasma density response. We study the growth rates of the Raman forward and backward scattering instabilities as well of the Brillouin and self-focusing/modulational instabilities. The nonlinear evolution of the instabilities is investigated by means of direct simulations of the time-dependent system of nonlinear equations.
  • The collective production of electron-positron pairs by electrostatic waves in quantum plasmas is investigated. In particular, a semi-classical governing set of equation for a self-consistent treatment of pair creation by the Schwinger mechanism in a quantum plasma is derived.
  • We investigate the acceleration of electrons via their interaction with electrostatic waves, driven by the relativistic Buneman instability, in a system dominated by counter-propagating proton beams. We observe the growth of these waves and their subsequent saturation via electron trapping for a range of proton beam velocities, from 0.15c to 0.9c. We can report a reduced stability of the electrostatic wave (ESW) with increasing non-relativistic beam velocities and an improved wave stability for increasing relativistic beam velocities, both in accordance with previous findings. At the highest beam speeds, we find the system to be stable again for a period of ~160 plasma periods. Furthermore we observe a, to our knowledge, previously unreported secondary electron acceleration mechanism at low beam speeds. We believe that it is the result of parametric couplings to produce high phase velocity ESW's which then trap electrons, accelerating them to higher energies. This allows electrons in our simulation study to achieve the injection energy required for Fermi acceleration, for beam speeds as low as 0.15c in unmagnetised plasma.
  • Observations of synchrotron radiation across a wide range of wavelengths provide clear evidence that electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies in supernova remnants (SNRs). However, a viable mechanism for the pre-acceleration of such electrons to mildly relativistic energies has not yet been established. In this paper an electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to simulate acceleration of electrons from background energies to tens of keV at perpendicular collisionless shocks associated with SNRs. Free energy for electron energization is provided by ions reflected from the shock front, with speeds greater than the upstream electron thermal speed. The PIC simulation results contain several new features, including: the acceleration, rather than heating, of electrons via the Buneman instability; the acceleration of electrons to speeds exceeding those of the shock-reflected ions producing the instability; and strong acceleration of electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field. Electron energization takes place through a variety of resonant and non-resonant processes, of which the strongest involves stochastic wave-particle interactions. In SNRs the diffusive shock process could then supply the final step required for the production of fully relativistic electrons. The mechanisms identified in this paper thus provide a possible solution to the electron pre-acceleration problem.