• The grand-design face-on spiral galaxy NGC6946 is remarkable because of its high star formation activity, the massive northern spiral arm, and the magnetic arms, which are observed in polarized radio synchrotron emission and are located between the optical arms and possibly are magnetic reconnection regions. X-ray observations of NGC6946 performed with XMM-Newton were used to study the emission from X-ray point sources and diffuse hot gas, including the magnetic arms and the halo. Spectral fitting of the diffuse X-ray emission allowed us to derive temperatures of the hot gas. With assumptions about the emission volume, this allowed us to estimate gas densities, masses, and cooling times. To explain the X-ray emission from the spiral arms of NGC6946 two-temperature plasma models are needed to account for the disk and halo emission. The interarm regions show only one thermal component. We observe that the temperature of the hot gas in and above the magnetic arm regions increases slightly when compared to the average temperatures in the areas in and above the spiral arms. For the southwestern part of the disk, which is depolarized in the radio range by Faraday rotation, we find more efficient mixing of disk and halo gas. We propose magnetic reconnection in the magnetic arm regions of NGC6946 as the possible cause of the additional heating of the gas and ordering of the magnetic fields. In the southwestern part of the galactic disk we observed indications of a possible faster outflow of the hot gas. A very hot gas within the MF16 nebula possibly suggests shock heating by a supernova explosion.
  • Isotropic and anisotropic wavelet transforms are used to decompose the images of the spiral galaxy M83 in various tracers to quantify structures in a range of scales from 0.2 to 10 kpc. We used radio polarization observations at {\lambda}6 cm and 13 cm obtained with the VLA, Effelsberg and ATCA telescopes and APEX sub-mm observations at 870 {\mu}m, which are first published here, together with maps of the emission of warm dust, ionized gas, molecular gas, and atomic gas. The spatial power spectra are similar for the tracers of dust, gas, and total magnetic field, while the spectra of the ordered magnetic field are significantly different. The wavelet cross-correlation between all material tracers and total magnetic field is high, while the structures of the ordered magnetic field are poorly correlated with those of other tracers. -- The magnetic field configuration in M83 contains pronounced magnetic arms. Some of them are displaced from the corresponding material arms, while others overlap with the material arms. The magnetic field vectors at {\lambda}6 cm are aligned with the outer material arms, while significant deviations occur in the inner arms and in the bar region, possibly due to non-axisymmetric gas flows. Outside the bar region, the typical pitch angles of the material and magnetic spiral arms are very close to each other at about 10{\deg}. The typical pitch angle of the magnetic field vectors is about 20{\deg} larger than that of the material spiral arms. One of the main magnetic arms in M83 is displaced from the gaseous arms, while the other main arm overlaps a gaseous arm. We propose that a regular spiral magnetic field generated by a mean-field dynamo is compressed in material arms and partly aligned with them. The interaction of galactic dynamo action with a transient spiral pattern is a promising mechanism for producing such complicated spiral patterns as in M83.
  • We present a comprehensive X-ray study of the population of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the LMC. Using primarily XMM-Newton, we conduct a systematic spectral analysis of LMC SNRs to gain new insights on their evolution and the interplay with their host galaxy. We combined all the archival XMM observations of the LMC with those of our Very Large Programme survey. We produced X-ray images and spectra of 51 SNRs, out of a list of 59. Using a careful modelling of the background, we consistently analysed all the X-ray spectra and measure temperatures, luminosities, and chemical compositions. We investigated the spatial distribution of SNRs in the LMC and the connection with their environment, characterised by various SFHs. We tentatively typed all LMC SNRs to constrain the ratio of core-collapse to type Ia SN rates in the LMC. We compared the X-ray-derived column densities to HI maps to probe the three-dimensional structure of the LMC. This work provides the first homogeneous catalogue of X-ray spectral properties of LMC SNRs. It offers a complete census of LMC SNRs exhibiting Fe K lines (13% of the sample), or revealing contribution from hot SN ejecta (39%). Abundances in the LMC ISM are found to be 0.2-0.5 solar, with a lower [$\alpha$/Fe] than in the Milky Way. The ratio of CC/type Ia SN in the LMC is $N_{\mathrm{CC}}/N_{\mathrm{Ia}} = 1.35(_{-0.24}^{+0.11})$, lower than in local SN surveys and galaxy clusters. Comparison of X-ray luminosity functions of SNRs in Local Group galaxies reveals an intriguing excess of bright objects in the LMC. We confirm that 30 Doradus and the LMC Bar are offset from the main disc of the LMC, to the far and near sides, respectively. (abridged)
  • We assessed the scientific productivity and data usage statistics of XMM-Newton by examining 3272 refereed papers published until the end of 2012 that directly use XMM-Newton data. The SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) was accessed for information on each paper including the number of citations. For each paper, the XMM-Newton observation identifiers and instruments were determined and used extract detailed information from the XMM-Newton archive on the parameters of the observations. The information obtained from these sources was then combined to allow the scientific productivity of the mission to be assessed. Since three years after the launch, about 300 refereed papers per year were published that directly use XMM-Newton data. After more than 13 years in operation, this rate shows no decline. Since 2002, around 100 scientists per year have become lead authors for the first time. Each refereed XMM-Newton paper receives around four citations per year in the first few years with a long-term citation rate of three citations per year, more than five years after publication. About half of the articles citing XMM-Newton articles are not primarily X-ray observational papers. The distribution of elapsed time between observations taken under the Guest Observer programme and first article peaks at 2 years with a possible second peak at 3.25 years. Observations taken under the Target of Opportunity programme are published significantly faster, after one year on average. 90% of science time taken until the end of 2009 has been used in at least one article. Most observations were used more than once, yielding on average a factor of two in usage on available observing time per year. About 20% of all slew observations have been used in publications. The scientific productivity of XMM-Newton remains extremely high with no evidence that it is decreasing after more than 13 years of operations.
  • We present a detailed radio, X-ray and optical study of a newly discovered Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant (SNR) which we denote MCSNR J0508-6902. Observations from the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the $\textit{XMM-Newton}$ X-ray observatory are complemented by deep H$\alpha$ images and Anglo Australian Telescope AAOmega spectroscopic data to study the SNR shell and its shock-ionisation. Archival data at other wavelengths are also examined. The remnant follows a filled-in shell type morphology in the radio-continuum and has a size of $\sim$74 pc $\times$ 57 pc at the LMC distance. The X-ray emission exhibits a faint soft shell morphology with Fe-rich gas in its interior $-$ indicative of a Type Ia origin. The remnant appears to be mostly dissipated at higher radio-continuum frequencies leaving only the south-eastern limb fully detectable while in the optical it is the western side of the SNR shell that is clearly detected. The best-fit temperature to the shell X-ray emission ($kT = 0.41^{+0.05}_{-0.06}$ keV) is consistent with other large LMC SNRs. We determined an O/Fe ratio of $<21$ and an Fe mass of 0.5-1.8$~M_{\odot}$ in the interior of the remnant, both of which are consistent with the Type Ia scenario. We find an equipartition magnetic field for the remnant of $\sim$28 $\mu$G, a value typical of older SNRs and consistent with other analyses which also infer an older remnant.
  • The XMM-Newton survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) revealed 3053 X-ray sources with the majority expected to be active galactic nuclei (AGN) behind the SMC. However, the high stellar density in this field often does not allow assigning unique optical counterparts and hinders source classification. On the other hand, the association of X-ray point sources with radio emission can be used to select background AGN with high confidence, and to constrain other object classes like pulsar wind nebula. To classify X-ray and radio sources, we use clear correlations of X-ray sources found in the XMM-Newton survey with radio-continuum sources detected with ATCA and MOST. Deep radio-continuum images were searched for correlations with X-ray sources of the XMM-Newton SMC-survey point-source catalogue as well as galaxy clusters seen with extended X-ray emission. Eighty eight discrete radio sources were found in common with the X-ray point-source catalogue in addition to six correlations with extended X-ray sources. One source is identified as a Galactic star and eight as galaxies. Eight radio sources likely originate in AGN that are associated with clusters of galaxies seen in X-rays. One source is a PWN candidate. We obtain 43 new candidates for background sources located behind the SMC. A total of 24 X-ray sources show jet-like radio structures.
  • Local-Group galaxies provide access to samples of X-ray source populations of whole galaxies. The XMM-Newton survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) completely covers the bar and eastern wing with a 5.6 deg^2 area in the (0.2-12.0) keV band. To characterise the X-ray sources in the SMC field, we created a catalogue of point sources and sources with moderate extent. Sources with high extent (>40") have been presented in a companion paper. We searched for point sources in the EPIC images using sliding-box and maximum-likelihood techniques and classified the sources using hardness ratios, X-ray variability, and their multi-wavelength properties. The catalogue comprises 3053 unique X-ray sources with a median position uncertainty of 1.3" down to a flux limit for point sources of ~10^-14 erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the (0.2-4.5) keV band, corresponding to 5x10^33 erg s^-1 for sources in the SMC. We discuss statistical properties, like the spatial distribution, X-ray colour diagrams, luminosity functions, and time variability. We identified 49 SMC high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB), four super-soft X-ray sources (SSS), 34 foreground stars, and 72 active galactic nuclei (AGN) behind the SMC. In addition, we found candidates for SMC HMXBs (45) and faint SSSs (8) as well as AGN (2092) and galaxy clusters (13). We present the most up-to-date catalogue of the X-ray source population in the SMC field. In particular, the known population of X-ray binaries is greatly increased. We find that the bright-end slope of the luminosity function of Be/X-ray binaries significantly deviates from the expected universal high-mass X-ray binary luminosity function.
  • Although numerous archival XMM-Newton observations existed towards the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) before 2009, only a fraction of the whole galaxy was covered. Between May 2009 and March 2010 we carried out an XMM-Newton survey of the SMC, in order to obtain a complete overage of both its bar and wing. Thirty-three observations of 30 different fields with a total exposure of about ne Ms filled the missing parts. We systematically processed all available SMC data from the European Photon Imaging Camera. After rejecting observations with very high background we included 53 archival and the 33 survey observations. We produced images in five different energy bands. We applied astrometric boresight corrections using secure identifications of X-ray sources and combine all the images to produce a mosaic, which covers the main body of the SMC. We present an overview of the XMM-Newton observations, describe their analysis and summarise first results which will be presented in follow-up papers in detail. Here, we mainly focus on extended X-ray sources like supernova remnants (SNRs) and clusters of galaxies which are seen in our X-ray images. The XMM-Newton survey represents the deepest complete survey of the SMC in the 0.15-12.0 keV X-ray band. We propose three new SNRs with low surface brightness of a few 10^-14 erg s^-1 cm^-2 arcmin^-2 and large extent. Also several known remnants appear larger than previously measured from X-rays or other wavelengths extending the size distribution of SMC SNRs to larger values.
  • The hot intracluster/intragroup medium (ICM/IGM) and a high galaxy density can lead to perturbations of the galactic interstellar medium (ISM) due to ram pressure and/or tidal interaction effects. In radio polarimetry observations, both phenomena may manifest similar features. X-ray data can help to determine the real origin of the perturbation. We analyse the distribution and physical properties of the hot gas in the Virgo cluster spiral galaxies NGC 4254 and NGC 4569, which indicate that the cluster environment has had a significant influence on their properties. By performing both spatial and spectral analyses of X-ray data, we try to distinguish between two major phenomena: tidal and ram pressure interactions. We compare our findings with the case of NGC 2276, in which a shock was reported, by analysing XMM-Newton X-ray data for this galaxy. We use archival XMM-Newton observations of NGC 4254, NGC 4569, and NGC 2276. Maps of the soft diffuse emission in the energy band 0.2 - 1 keV are obtained. For the three galaxies, especially at the position of magnetic field enhancements we perform a spectral analysis to derive gas temperatures and thus to look for shock signatures. A shock is a signature of ram pressure resulting from supersonic velocities; weak tidal interactions are not expected to influence the temperature of the ionized gas. In NGC 4254, we do not observe any temperature increase. This suggests tidal interactions rather than ram pressure stripping. In NGC 4569 the radio polarized ridge shows a higher temperature, which may indicate ram-pressure effects. For NGC 2276, we do not find clear indications of a shock. The main driver of the observed distortions is most likely tidal interaction. Determining gas temperatures via sensitive X-ray observations seems to be a good method for distinguishing between ram pressure and tidal interaction effects acting upon a galaxy.
  • We present the results of a 500 ksec long XMM-Newton observation and a 120 ksec long quasi-simultaneous Chandra observation of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H0707-495 performed in 2010 September. Consistent with earlier results by Fabian et al. (2009) and Zoghbi et al. (2010), the spectrum is found to be dominated by relativistically broadened reflection features from an ionised accretion disc around a maximally rotating black hole. Even though the spectra changed between this observation and earlier XMM-Newton observations, the physical parameters of the black hole and accretion disc (i.e., spin and inclination) are consistent between both observations. We show that this reflection spectrum is slightly modified by absorption in a mildly relativistic, highly ionised outflow which changed velocity from around 0.11c to 0.18c between 2008 January and 2010 September. Alternative models, in which the spectral shape is dominated by absorption, lead to spectral fits of similar quality, however, the parameters inferred for the putative absorber are unphysical.
  • The detailed comparison between observations and simulations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in the Virgo cluster has led to a three dimensional view of the galaxy orbits within the hot intracluster medium. The 3D velocities and Mach numbers derived from simulations can be used to derive simple Mach cone geometries for Virgo spiral galaxies. We search for indications of hot gas within Mach cones in X-ray observations of selected Virgo Cluster spiral galaxies (NGC 4569, NGC 4388, and NGC 4501). We find extraplanar diffuse X-ray emission in all galaxies. Based on the 3D velocity vectors from dynamical modelling a simple Mach cone is fitted to the triangular shape of NGC 4569's diffuse X-ray emission. Assuming that all extraplanar diffuse X-ray emission has to be located inside the Mach cone, we also fit Mach cones to NGC 4388's and NGC 4501's extraplanar X-ray emission. For NGC 4569 it is hard to reconcile the derived Mach cone opening angle with a Mach number based on the sound speed alone. Instead, a Mach number involving the Alfv\'enic speed seems to be more appropriate, yielding a magnetic field strength of $\sim 3$-6 $\mu$G for a intracluster medium density of $n \sim 10^{-4}$ cm$^{-3}$. Whereas the temperature of the hot component of NGC 4569's X-ray halo (0.5 keV) is at the high end but typical for a galactic outflow, the temperature of the hot gas tails of NGC 4388 and NGC 4501 are significantly hotter (0.7-0.9 keV). In NGC 4569 we find direct evidence for a Mach cone which is filled with hot gas from a galactic superwind. We suggest that the high gas temperatures in the X-ray tails of NGC 4388 and NGC 4501 are due to the mixing of the stripped ISM into the hot intracluster medium of the Virgo cluster.
  • Aims: IKT 16 is an X-ray and radio-faint supernova remnant (SNR) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). A previous X-ray study of this SNR found a hard X-ray source near its centre. Using all available archival and proprietary XMM-Newton data, alongside new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and optical observations at H-alpha and forbidden [SII] and [OIII] lines, we aim to constrain the properties of the SNR and discover the nature of the hard source within. Methods: We combine XMM-Newton datasets to produce the highest quality X-ray image of IKT 16 to date. We use this, in combination with radio and optical images, to conduct a multi-wavelength morphological analysis of the remnant. We extract separate spectra from the SNR and the bright source near its centre, and conduct spectral fitting of both regions. Results: We find IKT 16 to have a radius of 37+-3 pc, with the bright source located 8+-2 pc from the centre. This is the largest known SNR in the SMC. The large size of the remnant suggests it is likely in the Sedov-adiabatic phase of evolution. Using a Sedov model to fit the SNR spectrum, we find an electron temperature kT of 1.03+-0.12 keV and an age of 14700 yr. The absorption found requires the remnant to be located deep within the SMC. The bright source is fit with a power law with index 1.58+-0.07, and is associated with diffuse radio emission extending towards the centre of the SNR. We argue that this source is likely to be the neutron star remnant of the supernova explosion, and infer its transverse kick velocity to be 580+-100 km/s. The X-ray and radio properties of this source strongly favour a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) origin.
  • In the course of the XMM-Newton survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), a region to the east of the emission nebula N19 was observed in November 2009. To search for new candidates for high mass X-ray binaries the EPIC PN and MOS data of the detected point sources were investigated and their spectral and temporal characteristics identified. A new transient (XMMUJ005011.2-730026= SXP214) with a pulse period of 214.05 s was discovered; the source had a hard X-ray spectrum with power-law index of ~0.65. The accurate X-ray source location permits the identification of the X-ray source with a ~15th magnitude Be star, thereby confirming this system as a new Be/X-ray binary.
  • One of the goals of the XMM-Newton survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud is the study of the Be/X-ray binary population. During one of our first survey observations a bright new transient - XMMUJ004814.0-732204 - was discovered. We present the analysis of the EPIC X-ray data together with optical observations, to investigate the spectral and temporal characteristics of XMMUJ004814.0-732204. We found coherent X-ray pulsations in the EPIC data with a period of (11.86642 +/- 0.00017) s. The X-ray spectrum can be modelled by an absorbed power-law with indication for a soft excess. Depending on the modelling of the soft X-ray spectrum, the photon index ranges between 0.53 and 0.66. We identify the optical counterpart as a B = 14.9mag star which was monitored during the MACHO and OGLE-III projects. The optical light curves show regular outbursts by ~0.5 mag in B and R and up to 0.9 mag in I which repeat with a time scale of about 1000 days. The OGLE-III optical colours of the star are consistent with an early B spectral type. An optical spectrum obtained at the 1.9 m telescope of the South African Astronomical Observatory in December 2009 shows H_alpha emission with an equivalent width of 3.5 +/- 0.6 A. The X-ray spectrum and the detection of pulsations suggest that XMMUJ004814.0-732204 is a new high mass X-ray binary pulsar in the SMC. The long term variability and the H_alpha emission line in the spectrum of the optical counterpart identify it as a Be/X-ray binary system.
  • The XMM-Newton survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was performed to study the population of X-ray sources in this neighbouring galaxy. During one of the observations, the symbiotic binary SMC3 was found at its highest X-ray luminosity observed until now. In SMC3 wind accretion from a giant donor star onto a white dwarf is believed to cause steady hydrogen burning on the white dwarf surface, making such systems candidates for supernova type Ia progenitors. It was suggested that the X-ray source is eclipsed every ~4.5 years by the companion star and its stellar wind to explain the large X-ray variability seen in ROSAT data. We use the available X-ray data to test this scenario. We present the ~20 year X-ray light curve of SMC3 and study the spectral evolution as seen with XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn to investigate possible scenarios which can reproduce the high X-ray variability. We did not find significant variations in the photo-electric absorption, as it would be expected during eclipse ingress and egress. Instead, the X-ray spectra from different intensity levels, when modelled by black-body emission, can be better explained by variations either in normalisation (by a factor of ~50) or in temperature (kT between 24 eV and 34 eV). The light curve shows maxima and minima with slow transitions between them. To explain the gradual variations in the X-ray light curve and to avoid changes in absorption by neutral gas, a predominant part of the stellar wind must be ionised by the X-ray source. Compton scattering with variable electron column density (of the order of 5 x 10^24 cm^-2) along the line of sight could then be responsible for the intensity changes. The X-ray variability of SMC3 could also be caused by temperature changes in the hydrogen burning envelope of the white dwarf, an effect which could even dominate if the stellar wind density is not sufficiently high.
  • On 2009 January 22 numerous strong bursts were detected from the anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408. Swift/XRT and XMM-Newton/EPIC observations carried out in the following two weeks led to the discovery of three X-ray rings centered on this source. The ring radii increased with time following the expansion law expected for a short impulse of X-rays scattered by three dust clouds. Assuming different models for the dust composition and grain size distribution, we fit the intensity decay of each ring as a function of time at different energies, obtaining tight constrains on the distance of the X-ray source. Although the distance strongly depends on the adopted dust model, we find that some models are incompatible with our X-ray data, restricting to 4-8 kpc the range of possible distances for 1E 1547.0-5408. The best-fitting dust model provides a source distance of 3.91 +/- 0.07 kpc, which is compatible with the proposed association with the supernova remnant G 327.24-0.13, and implies distances of 2.2 kpc, 2.6 kpc and 3.4 kpc for the dust clouds, in good agreement with the dust distribution inferred by CO line observations towards 1E 1547.0-5408. However, dust distances in agreement with CO data are also obtained for a set of similarly well-fitting models that imply a source distance of about 5 kpc. A distance of about 4-5 kpc is also favored by the fact that these dust models are already known to provide good fits to the dust-scattering halos of bright X-ray binaries.
  • Aims: We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission in the halo and the disc of the starburst galaxy NGC 253. Methods: After removing point-like sources, we analysed XMM-Newton images, hardness ratio maps and spectra from several regions in the halo and the disc. We introduce a method to produce vignetting corrected images from the EPIC pn data, and we developed a procedure that allows a correct background treatment for low surface brightness spectra, using a local background, together with closed filter observations. Results: Most of the emission from the halo is at energies below 1 keV. In the disc, also emission at higher energies is present. The extent of the diffuse emission along the major axis of the disc is 13.6 kpc. The halo resembles a horn structure and reaches out to ~9 kpc perpendicular to the disc. Disc regions that cover star forming regions, like spiral arms, show harder spectra than regions with lower star forming activity. Models for spectral fits of the disc regions need at least three components: two thermal plasmas with solar abundances plus a power law and galactic foreground absorption. Temperatures are between 0.1 and 0.3 keV and between 0.3 and 0.9 keV for the soft and the hard component, respectively. The power law component may indicate an unresolved contribution from X-ray binaries in the disc. The halo emission is not uniform, neither spatially nor spectrally. The southeastern halo is softer than the northwestern halo. To model the spectra in the halo, we needed two thermal plasmas with solar abundances plus galactic foreground absorption. Temperatures are around 0.1 and 0.3 keV. A comparison between X-ray and UV emission shows that both originate from the same regions.
  • Radio observations can show how cluster galaxies are affected by various environmental factors. We made three frequency radio-polarimetric VLA observations and performed sensitive XMM-Newton observations in X-rays and UV light of NGC4254. The distribution of total radio intensity at 8.46 4.86 GHz reveals a global asymmetry with a more diffuse and almost two times larger extension to the north than to the south. The radio polarized intensity is even more asymmetric, showing a strange bright ridge in the southern disk edge, displaced to the downstream side of the local density wave. Magnetic arms can be also seen in other disk portions, mostly avoiding nearby optical spiral arms. Spatially resolved emission of hot X-ray gas from the whole galactic disk, with its soft component closely tracing star-forming regions, is detected. The slope of the local radio nonthermal-infrared relation is <1, thus smaller than for the radio thermal-infrared one (>1). Using the radio thermal emission-based star formation rate (SFR) we find higher extinction in more Halpha luminous star-forming regions with a power-law slope of 0.83. The galaxy's estimated mean SFR of 0.026 M_sun/yr/kpc^2 is three times larger than in other spirals of similar Hubble type. NGC4254 seems to belong to the class of `young' Virgo cluster members, which recently experienced a gravitational encounter at the cluster's periphery, which perturbed its spiral arms by tidal forces and triggered a burst of star-formation which still maintains strong radio and infrared emissions. Tidal forces could also sheared the magnetic field in the southern disk portion and led to the observed polarized ridge, though, magnetic field compression by weak ram pressure forces of the cluster gas cannot be excluded.
  • Context. Supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) are characterised by very low temperatures (< 100 eV). Classical SSSs have bolometric luminosities in the range of 10^36-10^38 erg/s and are modelled with steady nuclear burning of hydrogen on the surfaces of white dwarfs. However, several SSSs have been discovered with much higher luminosities. Their nature is still unclear. Aims. We report the discovery of a 4h modulation for an ultraluminous SSS in the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4631, observed with XMM-Newton in 2002 June. Temporal and spectral analysis of the source is performed. Methods. We use a Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis for the period search and evaluate the confidence level using Monte-Carlo simulations. We measure the source temperature, flux and luminosity through spectral fitting. Results. A modulation of 4.2+-0.4 h (3 sigma error) was found for the SSS with a confidence level >99%. Besides dips observed in the light curve, the flux decreased by a factor of 3 within ~10h. The spectrum can be described with an absorbed blackbody model with kT~67eV. The absorbed luminosity in the 0.2-2 kev energy band was 2.7x10^38 erg/sec while the bolometric luminosity was a hundred time higher (3.2x10^40 erg/s), making the source one of the most luminous of its class, assuming the best fit model is correct. Conclusions. This source is another very luminous SSS for which the standard white dwarf interpretation cannot be applied, unless a strong beaming factor is considered. A stellar-mass black hole accreting at a super Eddington rate is a more likely interpretation, where the excess of accreted matter is ejected through a strong optically-thick outflow. The 4 h modulation could either be an eclipse from the companion star or the consequence of a warped accretion disk.
  • Earlier observations of NGC 1808 in various wavebands (X-ray, optical, near-infrared, radio) provided evidence for the existence of either a starburst or a Seyfert 2 nucleus. We here present the results of multiwavelength XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, which directly prove the co-existence of thermal diffuse plasma and non-nuclear unresolved point-like sources associated with the starburst activity, along with a Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nucleus (LLAGN) or an Ultra Luminous X-ray source (ULX). The broad bandwidth of XMM-Newton allows us to show that the unresolved nuclear source in NGC 1808 dominates the hard X-ray spectrum, while the emission in the soft regime, below 1 keV, is dominated by a thermal component associated to an extended starburst. Both EPIC and RGS data provide reliable detections of a number of emission lines from heavy elements, with abundances ranging from roughly 0.7 to 2.2 Z_sol for different elements. However, no 6.4 keV Fe K-alpha fluorescence line emission was detected. The analysis of the nuclear region of NGC 1808 allows us to detect and disentangle the contribution of an unresolved nuclear X-ray source and the starburst region, but the exact nature of the nucleus remains unknown. The observed luminosity of NGC 1808 is L(2-10 keV)=(1.61+/-0.06)E+40 erg/s. A comparison of our OM 212 nm image with a CTIO 4-m telescope H-alpha frame shows a good general correspondence between the emission from massive stars and warm ionized gas, with minor deviations near the ends of the bar in NGC 1808. An aditional, very soft thermal spectral component with kT~0.1 keV has been discovered in the XMM-Newton spectral analysis, which most likely originates from the halo of NGC 1808.
  • Observations of the southern peculiar galaxy NGC 2442 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in total and linearly polarized radio continuum at 6cm are presented and compared with previously obtained H$\alpha$ data. The distribution of polarized emission, a signature of regular magnetic fields, reveals some physical phenomena which are unusual among spiral galaxies. We find evidence for tidal interaction and/or ram pressure from the intergalactic medium compressing the magnetic field at the northern and western edges of the galaxy. The radial component of the regular magnetic field in the northern arm is directed away from the centre of the galaxy, a finding which is in contrast to the majority of galaxies studied to date. The oval distortion caused by the interaction generates a sudden jump of the magnetic field pattern upstream of the inner northern spiral arm, similar to galaxies with long bars. An unusual ``island'' of strong regular magnetic field east of the galaxy is probably the brightest part of a magnetic arm frequently seen in spiral galaxies, which appear to be phase-shifted images of the preceding optical arm. The strong magnetic field of the ``island'' indicates a past phase of active star formation when the preceding optical arm was exposed to ram pressure.
  • In an XMM-Newton raster observation of the bright Local Group spiral galaxy M 33 we study the population of X-ray sources (X-ray binaries, supernova remnants) down to a 0.2--4.5 keV luminosity of 10^35 erg/s -- more than a factor of 10 deeper than earlier ROSAT observations. EPIC hardness ratios and optical and radio information are used to distinguish between different source classes. The survey detects 408 sources in an area of 0.80 square degree. We correlate these newly detected sources with earlier M 33 X-ray catalogues and information from optical, infra-red and radio wavelengths. As M 33 sources we detect 21 supernova remnants (SNR) and 23 SNR candidates, 5 super-soft sources, and 2 X-ray binaries (XRBs). There are 267 sources classified as hard, which may either be XRBs or Crab-like SNRs in M 33 or background AGN. The 44 confirmed and candidate SNRs more than double the number of X-ray detected SNRs in M 33. 16 of these are proposed as SNR candidates from the X-ray data for the first time. On the other hand, there are several sources not connected to M 33: five foreground stars, 30 foreground star candidates, 12 active galactic nucleus candidates, one background galaxy and one background galaxy candidate. Extrapolating from deep field observations we would expect 175 to 210 background sources in this field. This indicates that about half of the sources detected are sources within M 33.
  • NGC1808 is a nearby spiral galaxy that harbours an active central region with an extent of 20 arcsec (i.e. 1 kpc). Previous X-ray and optical/NIR observations have provided convincing evidence for the existence of a starburst and an AGN. We present here preliminary results of the analysis of XMM-Newton data. We show a weak high-resolution soft X-ray spectrum with only emission lines typical of a starburst. Our analysis of the EPIC-pn spectrum shows two thermal components, but there is an additional, hard X-ray power law tail that is most likely due to an obscured active nucleus. Thus, our data show for the first time the presence of emission from both components, AGN and starburst, in one observation.
  • We observed the Galactic black hole candidate XTE J1650-500 early in its Fall, 2001 outburst with the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging pn Camera (EPIC-pn). The observed spectrum is consistent with the source having been in the "very high" state. We find a broad, skewed Fe K-alpha emission line which suggests that the primary in this system may be a Kerr black hole, and which indicates a steep emissivity profile that is hard to explain in terms of a standard accretion disk model. These results are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those from an XMM-Newton observation of the Seyfert galaxy MCG--6-30-15. The steep emissivity in MCG--6-30-15 may be explained by the extraction and dissipation of rotational energy from a black hole with nearly- maximal angular momentum or material in the plunging region via magnetic connections to the inner accretion disk. If this process is at work in both sources, an exotic but fundamental general relativistic prediction may be confirmed across a factor of 10^6 in black hole mass. We discuss these results in terms of the accretion flow geometry in stellar-mass black holes, and the variety of enigmatic phenomena often observed in the very high state.
  • (Abridged) We describe the results of the highest-resolution radio observations yet made of four relic radio sources in the Abell clusters A13, A85, A133 and A4038. Our VLA images at 1.4 GHz with 4" resolution show a remarkable variety of fine structure in the form of spectacular arcs, wisps, plumes and loops. Their integrated radio flux densities fall very rapidly with frequency, with power-law slopes between 2.1 and 4.4 near 1.4 GHz The relics possess linear polarization levels ranging between 2.3 % (A133) and 35 % (A85); the higher polarization fractions imply a highly ordered magnetic field in the fine structure and low differential Faraday rotation in the intervening cluster gas. The optical identification of host galaxies remains problematic. In A85, A133 and A4038 the travel times for the brightest cluster galaxies are significantly longer than the modeled ages of the relics and nearby bright ellipticals provide a better match. Excess X-ray emission in the 0.5 keV-to-2 keV band was found near the relics in A85 and A133. The surface brightness was too high to be attributed to the inverse-Compton mechanism alone. We found excellent fits to the broad-band radio spectra using the anisotropic (KGKP) model of spectral ageing, and we have extended the model to include diffusion of particles between regions of different field strength (the Murgia-JP, or MJP, model). The steep radio spectra imply ages for the relics of ~ 10^8 yr, at the start of which period their radio luminosities would have been ~ 10^25 W/Hz at 1.4 GHz.