• We study high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in model atoms driven by plasmonic-enhanced fields. These fields result from the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures by few-cycle laser pulses. We demonstrate that the spatial inhomogeneous character of the laser electric field, in a form of Gaussian-shaped functions, leads to an unexpected relationship between the HHG cutoff and the laser wavelength. Precise description of the spatial form of the plasmonic-enhanced field allows us to predict this relationship. We combine the numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE) with the plasmonic-enhanced electric fields obtained from 3D finite element simulations. We additionally employ classical simulations to supplement the TDSE outcomes and characterize the extended HHG spectra by means of their associated electron trajectories. A proper definition of the spatially inhomogeneous laser electric field is instrumental to accurately describe the underlying physics of HHG driven by plasmonic-enhanced fields. This characterization opens new perspectives for HHG control with various experimental nano-setups
  • A possible route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution is to employ recolliding electrons as `probes'. The recollision process in molecules is, however, very challenging to treat using {\it ab initio} approaches. Even for the simplest diatomic systems, such as H$_2$, today's computational capabilities are not enough to give a complete description of the electron and nuclear dynamics initiated by a strong laser field. As a consequence, approximate qualitative descriptions are called to play an important role. In this contribution we extend the work presented in N. Su\'arez {\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev. A {\bf 95}, 033415 (2017), to three-center molecular targets. Additionally, we incorporate a more accurate description of the molecular ground state, employing information extracted from quantum chemistry software packages. This step forward allows us to include, in a detailed way, both the molecular symmetries and nodes present in the high-occupied molecular orbital. We are able to, on the one hand, keep our formulation as analytical as in the case of diatomics, and, on the other hand, to still give a complete description of the underlying physics behind the above-threshold ionization process. The application of our approach to complex multicenter - with more than 3 centers, targets appears to be straightforward.
  • Electron-electron correlation effects play an instrumental role in our understanding of sequential (SDI) and non-sequential double ionization (NSDI) mechanisms. Here, we present a theoretical study of NSDI driven by plasmonic-enhanced spatial inhomogeneous fields. By numerically solving the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation for a linear reduced model of He and a double-electron time-evolution probability analysis, we provide evidence for the enhancement effects in NSDI showing that the double ionization yield at lower laser peak intensities is increased due to the inhomogeneity of the laser field. Furthermore, our quantum mechanical model, as well as classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations, show that inhomogeneous fields are a useful tool for splitting the binary and recoil processes in the rescattering scenario.
  • Studies of strong field ionization have historically relied on the strong field approximation, which neglects all spatial dependence in the forces experienced by the electron after ionization. More recently, the small spatial inhomogeneity introduced by the long-range Coulomb potential has been linked to a number of important features in the photoelectron spectrum, such as Coulomb asymmetry, Coulomb focusing, and the low energy structure (LES). Here, we demonstrate by combined quantum and classical simulations that a small time-varying spatial dependence in the laser electric field creates a prominent higher energy peak at energies above the "classical cut-off" for direct electrons. This higher energy structure (HES) originates from direct electrons ionized near the peak of a single half-cycle of the laser pulse. The HES is separated from all other ionization events (providing sub-cycle resolution) and is highly sensitive to the carrier envelope phase (CEP). The large accumulation of electrons with tuneable energy suggests a promising method for creating a localized source of electron pulses of attosecond duration using tabletop laser technology.
  • Strong field photoemission and electron recollision provide a viable route to extract electronic and nuclear dynamics from molecular targets with attosecond temporal resolution. However, since an {\em ab-initio} treatment of even the simplest diatomic systems is beyond today's capabilities approximate qualitative descriptions are warranted. In this paper, we develop such a theoretical approach to model the photoelectrons resulting from intense laser-molecule interaction. We present a general theory for symmetric diatomic molecules in the single active electron approximation that, amongst other capabilities, allows adjusting both the internuclear separation and molecular potential in a direct and simple way. More importantly we derive an analytic approximate solution of the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE), based on a generalized strong field approximation (SFA) version. Using that approach we obtain expressions for electrons emitted transition amplitudes from two different molecular centres, and accelerated then in the strong laser field. One innovative aspect of our theory is the fact that the dipole matrix elements are free from non-physical gauge and coordinate system dependent terms -- this is achieved by adapting the coordinate system, in which SFA is performed, to the centre from which the corresponding part of the time dependent wave function originates. Our analytic results agree very well with the numerical solution of the full three-dimensional TDSE for the H$_2^+$ molecule. Moreover, the theoretical model was applied to describe laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) measurements of O$_2^+$ molecules, obtained at ICFO, and reproduces the main features of the experiment very well. Our approach can be extended in a natural way to more complex molecules and multi-electron systems.
  • Recently two emerging areas of research, attosecond and nanoscale physics, have started to come together. Attosecond physics deals with phenomena occurring when ultrashort laser pulses, with duration on the femto- and sub-femtosecond time scales, interact with atoms, molecules or solids. The laser-induced electron dynamics occurs natively on a timescale down to a few hundred or even tens of attoseconds, which is comparable with the optical field. On the other hand, the second branch involves the manipulation and engineering of mesoscopic systems, such as solids, metals and dielectrics, with nanometric precision. Although nano-engineering is a vast and well-established research field on its own, the merger with intense laser physics is relatively recent. In this article we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical overview of physics that takes place when short and intense laser pulses interact with nanosystems, such as metallic and dielectric nanostructures. In particular we elucidate how the spatially inhomogeneous laser induced fields at a nanometer scale modify the laser-driven electron dynamics. Consequently, this has important impact on pivotal processes such as ATI and HHG. The deep understanding of the coupled dynamics between these spatially inhomogeneous fields and matter configures a promising way to new avenues of research and applications. Thanks to the maturity that attosecond physics has reached, together with the tremendous advance in material engineering and manipulation techniques, the age of atto-nano physics has begun, but it is in the initial stage. We present thus some of the open questions, challenges and prospects for experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions, as well as experiments aimed at characterizing the induced fields and the unique electron dynamics initiated by them with high temporal and spatial resolution.
  • We theoretically investigate high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in Rydberg atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous laser fields, induced, for instance, by plasmonic enhancement. It is well known that the laser intensity should to exceed certain threshold in order to generate HHG, when noble gas atoms in their ground state are used as an active medium. One way to enhance the coherent light coming from a conventional laser oscillator is to take advantage of the amplification obtained by the so-called surface plasmon polaritons, created when a low intensity laser field is focused onto a metallic nanostructure. The main limitation of this scheme is the low damage threshold of the materials employed in the nanostructures engineering. In this work we propose to use Rydberg atoms, driven by spatially inhomogeneous, plasmonic-enhanced laser fields, for HHG. We exhaustively discuss the behaviour and efficiency of these systems in the generation of coherent harmonic emission. To this aim we numerically solve the time-dependent Schr\"{o}dinger equation for an atom with an electron initially in a highly excited $n$-th Rydberg state, located in the vicinity of a metallic nanostructure, where the electric field changes spatially on the scales relevant for the dynamics of the laser-ionized electron. We first use a one-dimensional model to investigate the phenomena systematically. We then employ a more realistic situation, when the interaction of a plasmonic-enhanced laser field with a three-dimensional Hydrogen atom is modelled. We discuss the scaling of the relevant input parameters with the principal quantum number $n$ of the Rydberg state in question, and demonstrate that harmonic emission could be achieved from Rydberg atoms well below the damage threshold, thus without deteriorating the geometry and properties of the metallic nanostructure.
  • We present a theoretical study of the wave packet dynamics of the H$_2^+$ molecular ion in plasmon-enhanced laser fields. Such fields may be produced, for instance, when metallic nano-structures are illuminated by a laser pulse of moderated intensity. Their main property is that they vary in space on nanometer scales. We demonstrate that the spatial inhomogeneous character of these plasmonic fields leads to an enhancement of electron localization, an instrumental phenomenon that controls molecular fragmentation. We suggest that the charge-imbalance induced by the surface-plasmon resonance near the metallic nano-structures is the origin of the increase in the electron localization.
  • We present theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) driven by plasmonic fields in two-electron atomic systems. Comparing the two-active electron and single-active electron approximation models of the negative hydrogen ion atom, we provide strong evidence that a double non-sequential two-electron recombination appears to be the main responsible for the HHG cutoff extension. Our analysis is carried out by means of a reduced one-dimensional numerical integration of the two-electron time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE), and on investigations of the classical electron trajectories resulting from the Newton's equation of motion. Additional comparisons between the negative hydrogen ion and the helium atom suggest that the double recombination process depends distinctly on the atomic target. Our research paves the way to the understanding of strong field processes in multi-electronic systems driven by spatially inhomogeneous fields.
  • Theoretical approaches to strong field phenomena driven by plasmonic fields are based on the length gauge formulation of the laser-matter coupling. From the theoretical viewpoint it is known there exists no preferable gauge and consequently the predictions and outcomes should be independent of this choice. The use of the length gauge is mainly due to the fact that the quantity obtained from finite elements simulations of plasmonic fields is the plasmonic enhanced laser electric field rather than the laser vector potential. In this paper we develop, from first principles, the velocity gauge formulation of the problem and we apply it to the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in atoms. A comparison to the results obtained with the length gauge is made. It is analytically and numerically demonstrated that both gauges give equivalent descriptions of the emitted HHG spectra resulting from the interaction of a spatially inhomogeneous field and the single active electron (SAE) model of the helium atom. We discuss, however, advantages and disadvantages of using different gauges in terms of numerical efficiency.
  • We present the first theoretical investigation of carrier-wave Rabi flopping in real atoms by employing numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in alkali species. Given the short HHG cutoff, related to the low saturation intensity, we concentrate on the features of the third harmonic of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) atoms. For pulse areas of 2$\pi$ and Na atoms, a characteristic unique peak appears, which, after analyzing the ground state population, we correlate with the conventional Rabi flopping. On the other hand, for larger pulse areas, carrier-wave Rabi flopping occurs, and is associated with a more complex structure in the third harmonic. These new characteristics observed in K atoms indicate the breakdown of the area theorem, as was already demonstrated under similar circumstances in narrow band gap semiconductors.
  • We present studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) at laser intensities well above saturation. We use driving laser pulses which present a particular electron dynamics in the turn-on stage. Our results predict an increasing on the harmonic yield, after an initial dropping, when the laser intensity is increased. This fact contradicts the general belief of a progressive degradation of the harmonic emission at ultrahigh intensities. We have identified a particular set of trajectories which emerges in the turn-on stage of these singular laser pulses, responsible of the unexpected growth on the harmonic efficiency at this high intensity regime. Our study combines two complementary approaches: classical analysis and full quantum mechanical calculations resulting from the numerical integration of the 3-dimensional time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation complemented with the time-frequency analysis.
  • It was already experimentally demonstrated that high-energy electrons can be generated using metal nanotips as active media. In addition, it has been theoretically proven that the high-energy tail of the photoemitted electrons is intrinsically linked to the recollision phenomenon. Through this recollision process it is also possible to convert the energy gained by the laser-emitted electron in the continuum in a coherent XUV photon. It means the emission of harmonic radiation appears to be feasible, although it has not been experimentally demonstrated hitherto till now. In this paper, we employ a quantum mechanical approach to model the electron dipole moment including both the laser experimental conditions and the bulk matter properties and predict is possible to generate coherent UV and XUV radiation using metal nanotips as sources. Our quantum mechanical results are fully supported by their classical counterparts.
  • We present theoretical predictions of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the interaction of short femtosecond laser pulses with metal nanotips. It has been demonstrated that high energy electrons can be generated using nanotips as sources; furthermore the recollision mechanism has been proven to be the physical mechanism behind this photoemission. If recollision exists, it should be possible to convert the laser-gained energy by the electron in the continuum in a high energy photon. Consequently the emission of harmonic radiation appears to be viable, although it has not been experimentally demonstrated hitherto. We employ a quantum mechanical time dependent approach to model the electron dipole moment including both the laser experimental conditions and the bulk matter properties. The use of metal tips shall pave a new way of generating coherent XUV light with a femtosecond laser field.
  • A set of Mathematica functions is presented to model classically two of the most important processes in strong field physics, namely high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI). Our approach is based on the numerical solution of the Newton-Lorentz equation of an electron moving on an electric field and takes advantage of the symbolic languages features and graphical power of Mathematica. Similarly as in the Strong Field Approximation (SFA), the effects of atomic potential on the motion of electron in the laser field are neglected. The SFA has proven to be an essential tool in strong field physics in the sense that it is able to predict with great precision the harmonic (in the HHG) and energy (in the ATI) limits. We have extended substantially the conventional classical simulations, where the electric field is only dependent on time, including spatial nonhomogeneous fields and spatial and temporal synthesized fields. Spatial nonhomogeneous fields appear when metal nanosystems interact with strong and short laser pulses and temporal synthesized fields are routinely generated in attosecond laboratories around the world. Temporal and spatial synthesized fields have received special attention nowadays because they would allow to exceed considerably the conventional harmonic and electron energy frontiers. Classical simulations are an invaluable tool to explore exhaustively the parameters domain at a cheap computational cost, before massive quantum mechanical calculations, absolutely indispensable for detailed analysis, are performed.
  • We perform a detailed analysis of above threshold ionization (ATI) in atoms within the strong field approximation (SFA) by considering spatially inhomogeneous monochromatic laser fields. The locally enhanced field induced by resonance plasmons is an example for such inhomogeneous fields. We investigate how the individual pairs of quantum orbits contribute to the photoelectron spectra and the angular electron momentum distributions. We demonstrate that the quantum orbits have a very different behavior in the spatially inhomogeneous field when compared to the homogeneous field. In the case of inhomogeneous fields, the ionization and rescattering times differ between neighboring cycles, despite the field being monochromatic. Indeed, the contributions from one cycle may lead to a lower cutoff, while another may develop a higher cutoff. Within our model, we show that the ATI cutoff extends far beyond the semiclassical cutoff, as a function of inhomogeneity strength. Furthermore, the angular momentum distributions have very different features compared to the homogeneous case. For the neighboring cycles, the electron momentum distributions do not share the same absolute momentum, and they do not have the same yield
  • We present theoretical investigations of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the interaction of noble gases with localized surface plasmons. These plasmonic fields are produced when a metal nanoparticle is subject to a few-cycle laser pulse. The enhanced field, which largely depends on the geometrical shape of the metallic structure, has a strong spatial dependency. We demonstrate that the strong non-homogeneity of this laser field plays an important role in the HHG process and leads to a significant increase of the harmonic cut-off energy. In order to understand and characterize this new feature, we include the functional form of the laser electric field obtained from recent attosecond streaking experiments [F. S{\"u}{\ss}mann and M. F. Kling, Proc. of SPIE, {\bf Vol. 8096}, 80961C (2011)] in the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE). By performing classical simulations of the HHG process we show consistency between them and the quantum mechanical predictions. These allow us to understand the origin of the extended harmonic spectra as a selection of particular trajectory sets. The use of metal nanoparticles shall pave a completely new way of generating coherent XUV light with a laser field which characteristics can be synthesized locally.
  • We use three dimensional time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (3D--TDSE) to calculate angular electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra of atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous fields. An example for such inhomogeneous fields is the locally enhanced field induced by resonant plasmons, appearing at surfaces of metallic nanoparticles, nanotips and gold bow-tie shape nanostructures. Our studies show that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role in the above threshold ionization process in the tunneling regime, causing significant modifications to the electron momentum distributions and photoelectron spectra, while its effects in the multiphoton regime appear to be negligible. Indeed, through tunneling ATI process, one can obtain higher energy electrons as well as high degree of asymmetry in the momentum space map. In this study we consider near infrared laser fields with intensities in the mid-$10^{14}$ W/cm$^{2}$ range and we use linear approximation to describe their spatial dependence. We show that in this case it is possible to drive electrons with energies in the near-keV regime. Furthermore, we study how the carrier envelope phase influences the emission of ATI photoelectrons for few-cycle pulses. Our quantum mechanical calculations are fully supported by their classical counterparts.
  • We present theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in rare gases driven by plasmonic field enhancement. This kind of fields appears when plasmonic nanostructures are illuminated by an intense few-cycle laser and have a particular spatial dependency, depending on the geometrical shape of the nanostructure. We demonstrate that the strong nonhomogeneous character of the laser enhanced field plays an important role in the HHG process and significantly extends the harmonic cutoff. Our models are based on numerical solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) and supported by classical and semiclassical calculations.
  • In strong field laser physics it is a common practice to use the high-order harmonic cutoff to estimate the laser intensity of the pulse that generates the harmonic radiation. Based on the semiclassical arguments it is possible to find a direct relationship between the maximum value of the photon energy and the laser intensity. This approach is only valid if the electric field driving HHG is spatially homogenous. In laser-matter processes driven by plasmonics fields, the enhanced fields present a spatial dependence that strongly modifies the electron motion and consequently the laser driven phenomena. As a result, this method should be revised in order to more realistically estimate the field. In this work, we demonstrate how the inhomogeneity of the fields will effect this estimation. Furthermore, by employing both quantum mechanical and classical calculations, we show how one can obtain a better estimation for the intensity of the enhanced field in plasmonic nanostructure.
  • We present theoretical studies of above threshold ionization (ATI) produced by spatially inhomogeneous fields. This kind of field appears as a result of the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures and metal nanoparticles with a short laser pulse. We use the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE) in reduced dimensions to understand and characterize the ATI features in these fields. It is demonstrated that the inhomogeneity of the laser electric field plays an important role in the ATI process and it produces appreciable modifications to the energy-resolved photoelectron spectra. In fact, our numerical simulations reveal that high energy electrons can be generated. Specifically, using a linear approximation for the spatial dependence of the enhanced plasmonic field and with a near infrared laser with intensities in the mid- 10^{14} W/cm^{2} range, we show it is possible to drive electrons with energies in the near-keV regime. Furthermore, we study how the carrier envelope phase influences the emission of ATI photoelectrons for few-cycle pulses. Our quantum mechanical calculations are supported by their classical counterparts.
  • We perform a detailed analysis of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in atoms within the strong field approximation (SFA) by considering spatially inhomogeneous monochromatic laser fields. We investigate how the individual pairs of quantum orbits contribute to the harmonic spectra. We show that in the case of inhomogeneous fields, the electron tunnels with two different canonical momenta. One of them leads to a higher cutoff and the other one develops a lower cutoff. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the quantum orbits have a very different behavior in comparison to the homogeneous field. We also conclude that in the case of the inhomogeneous fields, both odd and even harmonics are present in the HHG spectra. Within our model, we show that the HHG cutoff extends far beyond the semiclassical cutoff as a function of inhomogeneity strength. Our findings are in good agreement both with quantum mechanical and classical models.
  • We present numerical simulations of high-order harmonic generation in helium using a temporally synthesised and spatially non-homogeneous strong laser field. The combination of temporal and spatial laser field synthesis results in a dramatic cut-off extension far beyond the usual semiclassical limit. Our predictions are based on the convergence of three complementary approaches: resolution of the three dimensional Time Dependent Schr\"odinger Equation, time-frequency analysis of the resulting dipole moment and classical trajectories extraction. Employing a combination of temporally and spatially synthesised laser field provides coherent XUV photons beyond the carbon K-edge which is of high interest for initiating inner-shell dynamics and study time-resolved intra-molecular attosecond spectroscopy.
  • We study high-order harmonic generation (HHG) resulting from the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures with a short laser pulse. We show that both the inhomogeneities of the local electric field and the confinement of the electron motion play an important role in the HHG process and lead to a significant increase of the harmonic cutoff. In order to understand and characterize this feature, we combine the numerical solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) with the electric fields obtained from 3D finite element simulations. We employ time-frequency analysis to extract more detailed information from the TDSE results and to explain the extended harmonic spectra. Our findings have the potential to boost up the utilization of HHG as coherent extreme ultraviolet (XUV) sources.
  • We present theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) produced by non-homogeneous fields as resulting from the illumination of plasmonic nanostructures with a short laser pulse. We show that both the inhomogeneity of the local fields and the confinement of the electron movement play an important role in the HHG process and lead to the generation of even harmonics and a significantly increased cutoff, more pronounced for the longer wavelengths cases studied. In order to understand and characterize the new HHG features we employ two different approaches: the numerical solution of the time dependent Schr\"odinger equation (TDSE) and the semiclassical approach known as Strong Field Approximation (SFA). Both approaches predict comparable results and show the new features, but using the semiclassical arguments behind the SFA and time-frequency analysis tools, we are able to fully understand the reasons of the cutoff extension.