• Galaxies represent one of the preferred candidate sources to drive the reionization of the universe. Even as gains are made in mapping the galaxy UV luminosity density to z>6, significant uncertainties remain regarding the conversion to the implied ionizing emissivity. The relevant unknowns are the Lyman-continuum (LyC) photon production efficiency xi_{ion} and the escape fraction f_{esc}. As we show here, the first of these unknowns is directly measureable in z=4-5 galaxies, based on the impact the Halpha line has on the observed IRAC fluxes. By computing a LyC photon production rate from the implied Halpha luminosities for a broad selection of z=4-5 galaxies and comparing this against the dust-corrected UV-continuum luminosities, we provide the first-ever direct estimates of the LyC photon production efficiency xi_{ion} for the z>~4 galaxy population. We find log_{10} xi_{ion}/[Hz/ergs] to have a mean value of 25.27_{-0.03}^{+0.03} and 25.34_{-0.02}^{+0.02} for sub-L* z=4-5 galaxies adopting Calzetti and SMC dust laws, respectively. Reassuringly, both values are consistent with standardly assumed xi_{ion}'s in reionization models, with a slight preference for higher xi_{ion}'s (by ~0.1 dex) adopting the SMC dust law. A modest ~0.03-dex increase in these estimates would result if the escape fraction for ionizing photons is non-zero and galaxies dominate the ionizing emissivity at z~4.4. High values of xi_{ion} (~25.5-25.8 dex) are derived for the bluest galaxies (beta<-2.3) in our samples, independent of dust law and consistent with results for a z=7.045 galaxy. Such elevated values of xi_{ion} would have important consequences, indicating that f_{esc} cannot be in excess of 13% unless the galaxy UV luminosity function does not extend down to -13 mag or the clumping factor is greater than 3. A low escape fraction would fit well with the low rate of LyC leakage observed at z~3.
  • We present K-band spectra of rest-frame optical emission lines for 24 star-forming galaxies at z~3.2-3.7 using MOSFIRE on the Keck 1 telescope. Strong rest-frame optical [O III] and Hbeta emission lines were detected in 18 LBGs. The median flux ratio of [O III]5007 to Hbeta is 5.1+/-0.5, a factor of 5-10x higher than in local galaxies with similar stellar masses. The observed Hbeta luminosities are in good agreement with expectations from the estimated star-formation rates, and none of our sources are detected in deep X-ray stacks, ruling out significant contamination by active galactic nuclei. Combining our sample with a variety of LBGs from the literature, including 49 galaxies selected in a very similar manner, we find a high median ratio of [OIII]/Hbeta = 4.8+0.8-1.7. This high ratio seems to be an ubiquitous feature of z~3-4 LBGs, very different from typical local star-forming galaxies at similar stellar masses. The only comparable systems at z~0 are those with similarly high specific star-formation rates, though ~5x lower stellar masses. High specific star-formation rates either result in a much higher ionization parameter or other unusual conditions for the interstellar medium, which result in a much higher [OIII]/Hbeta line ratio. This implies a strong relation between a global property of a galaxy, the specific star-formation rate, and the local conditions of ISM in star-forming regions.
  • The Large Early Galaxy Census (LEGA-C) is a Public Spectroscopic Survey of $\sim3200$ $K$-band selected galaxies at redshifts $z=0.6-1.0$ with stellar masses M_star > 1e10M_sun, conducted with VIMOS on ESO's Very Large Telescope. The survey is embedded in the COSMOS field ($R.A. = 10h00$; $Dec.=+2\deg$). The 20-hour long integrations produce high-$S/N$ continuum spectra that reveal ages, metallicities and velocity dispersions of the stellar populations. LEGA-C's unique combination of sample size and depth will enable us for the first time to map the stellar content at large look-back time, across galaxies of different types and star-formation activity. Observations started in December 2014 and are planned to be completed by mid 2018, with early data releases of the spectra and value-added products. In this paper we present the science case, the observing strategy, an overview of the data reduction process and data products, and a first look at the relationship between galaxy structure and spectral properties, as it existed 7 Gyr ago.
  • We present Hubble WFC3/IR slitless grism spectra of a remarkably bright $z\gtrsim10$ galaxy candidate, GN-z11, identified initially from CANDELS/GOODS-N imaging data. A significant spectroscopic continuum break is detected at $\lambda=1.47\pm0.01~\mu$m. The new grism data, combined with the photometric data, rule out all plausible lower redshift solutions for this source. The only viable solution is that this continuum break is the Ly$\alpha$ break redshifted to ${z_\mathrm{grism}=11.09^{+0.08}_{-0.12}}$, just $\sim$400 Myr after the Big Bang. This observation extends the current spectroscopic frontier by 150 Myr to well before the Planck (instantaneous) cosmic reionization peak at z~8.8, demonstrating that galaxy build-up was well underway early in the reionization epoch at z>10. GN-z11 is remarkably and unexpectedly luminous for a galaxy at such an early time: its UV luminosity is 3x larger than L* measured at z~6-8. The Spitzer IRAC detections up to 4.5 $\mu$m of this galaxy are consistent with a stellar mass of ${\sim10^{9}~M_\odot}$. This spectroscopic redshift measurement suggests that the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be able to similarly and easily confirm such sources at z>10 and characterize their physical properties through detailed spectroscopy. Furthermore, WFIRST, with its wide-field near-IR imaging, would find large numbers of similar galaxies and contribute greatly to JWST's spectroscopy, if it is launched early enough to overlap with JWST.
  • The IRAC ultradeep field (IUDF) and IRAC Legacy over GOODS (IGOODS) programs are two ultradeep imaging surveys at 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m with the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC). The primary aim is to directly detect the infrared light of reionization epoch galaxies at z > 7 and to constrain their stellar populations. The observations cover the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF), including the two HUDF parallel fields, and the CANDELS/GOODS-South, and are combined with archival data from all previous deep programs into one ultradeep dataset. The resulting imaging reaches unprecedented coverage in IRAC 3.6{\mu}m and 4.5{\mu}m ranging from > 50 hour over 150 arcmin^2, > 100 hour over 60 sq arcmin2, to 200 hour over 5 - 10 arcmin$^2$. This paper presents the survey description, data reduction, and public release of reduced mosaics on the same astrometric system as the CANDELS/GOODS-South WFC3 data. To facilitate prior-based WFC3+IRAC photometry, we introduce a new method to create high signal-to-noise PSFs from the IRAC data and reconstruct the complex spatial variation due to survey geometry. The PSF maps are included in the release, as are registered maps of subsets of the data to enable reliability and variability studies. Simulations show that the noise in the ultradeep IRAC images decreases approximately as the square root of integration time over the range 20 - 200 hours, well below the classical confusion limit, reaching 1{\sigma} point source sensitivities as faint as of 15 nJy (28.5 AB) at 3.6{\mu}m and 18 nJy (28.3 AB) at 4.5{\mu}m. The value of such ultradeep IRAC data is illustrated by direct detections of z = 7 - 8 galaxies as faint as HAB = 28.
  • The remarkable HST datasets from the CANDELS, HUDF09, HUDF12, ERS, and BoRG/HIPPIES programs have allowed us to map out the evolution of the UV LF from z~10 to z~4. We have identified 5859, 3001, 857, 481, 217, and 6 galaxy candidates at z~4, z~5, z~6, z~7, z~8, and z~10, respectively from the ~1000 arcmin**2 area probed. The selection of z~4-8 galaxies over the five CANDELS fields allows us to assess the cosmic variance; the largest variations are apparent at z>=7. Our new LF determinations at z~4 and z~5 span a 6-mag baseline (-22.5 to -16 AB mag). These determinations agree well with previous estimates, but the larger samples and volumes probed here result in a more reliable sampling of >L* galaxies and allow us to reassess the form of the UV LFs. Our new LF results strengthen our earlier findings to 3.4 sigma significance for a steeper faint-end slope to the UV LF at z>4, with alpha evolving from alpha=-1.64+/-0.04 at z~4 to alpha=-2.06+/-0.13 at z~7 (and alpha = -2.02+/-0.23 at z~8), consistent with that expected from the evolution of the halo mass function. With our improved constraints at the bright end, we find less evolution in the characteristic luminosity M* over the redshift range z~4 to z~7; the observed evolution in the LF is now largely represented by changes in phi*. No evidence for a non-Schechter-like form to the z~4-8 LFs is found. A simple conditional LF model based on halo growth and evolution in the M/L ratio of halos ((1+z)**-1.5) provides a good representation of the observed evolution.
  • We utilise a two-color Lyman-Break selection criterion to search for z~9-10 galaxies over the first 19 clusters in the CLASH program. A systematic search yields three z~9-10 candidates. While we have already reported the most robust of these candidates, MACS1149-JD, two additional z~9 candidates are also found and have H_{160}-band magnitudes of ~26.2-26.9. A careful assessment of various sources of contamination suggests <~1 contaminants for our z~9-10 selection. To determine the implications of these search results for the LF and SFR density at z~9, we introduce a new differential approach to deriving these quantities in lensing fields. Our procedure is to derive the evolution by comparing the number of z~9-10 galaxy candidates found in CLASH with the number of galaxies in a slightly lower redshift sample (after correcting for the differences in selection volumes), here taken to be z~8. This procedure takes advantage of the fact that the relative volumes available for the z~8 and z~9-10 selections behind lensing clusters are not greatly dependent on the details of the lensing models. We find that the normalization of the UV LF at z~9 is just 0.28_{-0.20}^{+0.39}\times that at z~8, ~1.4_{-0.8}^{+3.0}x lower than extrapolating z~4-8 LF results. While consistent with the evolution in the UV LF seen at z~4-8, these results marginally favor a more rapid evolution at z>8. Compared to similar evolutionary findings from the HUDF, our result is less insensitive to large-scale structure uncertainties, given our many independent sightlines on the high-redshift universe.
  • We determine the intrinsic, 3-dimensional shape distribution of star-forming galaxies at 0<z<2.5, as inferred from their observed projected axis ratios. In the present-day universe star-forming galaxies of all masses 1e9 - 1e11 Msol are predominantly thin, nearly oblate disks, in line with previous studies. We now extend this to higher redshifts, and find that among massive galaxies (M* > 1e10 Msol) disks are the most common geometric shape at all z < 2. Lower-mass galaxies at z>1 possess a broad range of geometric shapes: the fraction of elongated (prolate) galaxies increases toward higher redshifts and lower masses. Galaxies with stellar mass 1e9 Msol (1e10 Msol) are a mix of roughly equal numbers of elongated and disk galaxies at z~1 (z~2). This suggests that galaxies in this mass range do not yet have disks that are sustained over many orbital periods, implying that galaxies with present-day stellar mass comparable to that of the Milky Way typically first formed such sustained stellar disks at redshift z~1.5-2. Combined with constraints on the evolution of the star formation rate density and the distribution of star formation over galaxies with different masses, our findings imply that, averaged over cosmic time, the majority of stars formed in disks.
  • We measure the UV-continuum slope beta for over 4000 high-redshift galaxies over a wide range of redshifts z~4-8 and luminosities from the HST HUDF/XDF, HUDF09-1, HUDF09-2, ERS, CANDELS-N, and CANDELS-S data sets. Our new beta results reach very faint levels at z~4 (-15.5 mag: 0.006 L*(z=3)), z~5 (-16.5 mag: 0.014L*(z=3)), and z~6 and z~7 (-17 mag: 0.025 L*(z=3)). Inconsistencies between previous studies led us to conduct a comprehensive review of systematic errors and develop a new technique for measuring beta that is robust against biases that arise from the impact of noise. We demonstrate, by object-by-object comparisons, that all previous studies, including our own and those done on the latest HUDF12 dataset, suffer from small systematic errors in beta. We find that after correcting for the systematic errors (typically d(beta) ~0.1-0.2) all beta results at z~7 from different groups are in excellent agreement. The mean beta we measure for faint (-18 mag: 0.1L*(z=3)) z~4, z~5, z~6, and z~7 galaxies is -2.03+/-0.03+/-0.06 (random and systematic errors), -2.14+/-0.06+/-0.06, -2.24+/-0.11+/-0.08, and -2.30+/-0.18+/-0.13, respectively. Our new beta values are redder than we have reported in the past, but bluer than other recent results. Our previously reported trend of bluer beta's at lower luminosities is confirmed, as is the evolution to bluer beta's at high redshifts. beta appears to show only a mild luminosity dependence faintward of M(UV,AB) ~ -19 mag, suggesting that the mean beta asymptotes to ~ -2.2 to -2.4 for faint z>~4 galaxies. At z~7, the observed beta's suggest non-zero, but low dust extinction, and they agree well with values predicted in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations.
  • Spectroscopic + photometric redshifts, stellar mass estimates, and rest-frame colors from the 3D-HST survey are combined with structural parameter measurements from CANDELS imaging to determine the galaxy size-mass distribution over the redshift range 0<z<3. Separating early- and late-type galaxies on the basis of star-formation activity, we confirm that early-type galaxies are on average smaller than late-type galaxies at all redshifts, and find a significantly different rate of average size evolution at fixed galaxy mass, with fast evolution for the early-type population, R_eff ~ (1+z)^-1.48, and moderate evolution for the late-type population, R_eff ~ (1+z)^-0.75. The large sample size and dynamic range in both galaxy mass and redshift, in combination with the high fidelity of our measurements due to the extensive use of spectroscopic data, not only fortify previous results, but also enable us to probe beyond simple average galaxy size measurements. At all redshifts the slope of the size-mass relation is shallow, R_eff ~ M_star^0.22, for late-type galaxies with stellar mass >3x10^9 M_sol, and steep, R_eff M_star^0.75, for early-type galaxies with stellar mass >2x10^10 M_sol. The intrinsic scatter is <~0.2 dex for all galaxy types and redshifts. For late-type galaxies, the logarithmic size distribution is not symmetric, but skewed toward small sizes: at all redshifts and masses a tail of small late-type galaxies exists that overlaps in size with the early-type galaxy population. The number density of massive (~10^11 M_sol), compact (R_eff < 2 kpc) early-type galaxies increases from z=3 to z=1.5-2 and then strongly decreases at later cosmic times.
  • In this paper we describe the first data release of the UltraVISTA near-infrared imaging survey of the COSMOS field. We summarise the key goals and design of the survey and provide a detailed description of our data reduction techniques . We provide stacked, sky-subtracted images in $YJHK_{\rm s}$ and narrow-band filters constructed from data collected during the first year of UltraVISTA observations. Our stacked images reach $5\sigma$ $AB$ depths in an aperture of $2\arcsec$ diameter of $\sim 25$ in $Y$ and $\sim 24$ in $JHK_{\rm s}$ bands and all have sub-arcsecond seeing. To this $5\sigma$ limit, our $K_{\rm s}$ catalogue contains 216,268 sources. We carry out a series of quality assessment tests on our images and catalogues, comparing our stacks with existing catalogues. The $1\sigma$ astrometric RMS in both directions for stars selected with $17.0<K_{\rm s}\rm {(AB)} <19.5$ is $\sim 0.08\arcsec$ in comparison to the publicly-available COSMOS ACS catalogues. Our images are resampled to the same pixel scale and tangent point as the publicly available COSMOS data and so may be easily used to generate multi-colour catalogues using this data. All images and catalogues presented in this paper are publicly available through ESO's "phase 3" archiving and distribution system and from the UltraVISTA web site.
  • We identify 73 z~7 and 59 z~8 candidate galaxies in the reionization epoch, and use this large 26-29.4 AB mag sample of galaxies to derive very deep luminosity functions to <-18 AB mag and the star formation rate density at z~7 and z~8. The galaxy sample is derived using a sophisticated Lyman-Break technique on the full two-year WFC3/IR and ACS data available over the HUDF09 (~29.4 AB mag, 5 sigma), two nearby HUDF09 fields (~29 AB mag, 14 arcmin) and the wider area ERS (~27.5 AB mag) ~40 arcmin**2). The application of strict optical non-detection criteria ensures the contamination fraction is kept low (just ~7% in the HUDF). This very low value includes a full assessment of the contamination from lower redshift sources, photometric scatter, AGN, spurious sources, low mass stars, and transients (e.g., SNe). From careful modelling of the selection volumes for each of our search fields we derive luminosity functions for galaxies at z~7 and z~8 to <-18 AB mag. The faint-end slopes alpha at z~7 and z~8 are uncertain but very steep at alpha = -2.01+/-0.21 and alpha=-1.91+/-0.32, respectively. Such steep slopes contrast to the local alpha<~-1.4 and may even be steeper than that at z~4 where alpha=-1.73+/-0.05. With such steep slopes (alpha<~-1.7) lower luminosity galaxies dominate the galaxy luminosity density during the epoch of reionization. The star formation rate densities derived from these new z~7 and z~8 luminosity functions are consistent with the trends found at later times (lower redshifts). We find reasonable consistency, with the SFR densities implied from reported stellar mass densities, being only ~40% higher at z<7. This suggests that (1) the stellar mass densities inferred from the Spitzer IRAC photometry are reasonably accurate and (2) that the IMF at very high redshift may not be very different from that at later times.
  • Searches for very-high-redshift galaxies over the past decade have yielded a large sample of more than 6,000 galaxies existing just 900-2,000 million years (Myr) after the Big Bang (redshifts 6 > z > 3; ref. 1). The Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF09) data have yielded the first reliable detections of z ~ 8 galaxies that, together with reports of a gamma-ray burst at z ~ 8.2 (refs 10, 11), constitute the earliest objects reliably reported to date. Observations of z ~ 7-8 galaxies suggest substantial star formation at z > 9-10. Here we use the full two-year HUDF09 data to conduct an ultra-deep search for z ~ 10 galaxies in the heart of the reionization epoch, only 500 Myr after the Big Bang. Not only do we find one possible z ~ 10 galaxy candidate, but we show that, regardless of source detections, the star formation rate density is much smaller (~10%) at this time than it is just ~200 Myr later at z ~ 8. This demonstrates how rapid galaxy build-up was at z ~ 10, as galaxies increased in both luminosity density and volume density from z ~ 8 to z ~ 10. The 100-200 Myr before z ~ 10 is clearly a crucial phase in the assembly of the earliest galaxies.
  • We present the Spitzer IRAC/MUSYC Public Legacy Survey in the Extended CDF-South (SIMPLE), which consists of deep IRAC observations covering the ~1,600 arcmin^2 area surrounding GOODS-S. The limiting magnitudes of the SIMPLE IRAC mosaics typically are 23.8, 23.6, 21.9, and 21.7, at 3.6 um, 4.5 um, 5.8 um, and 8.0 um, respectively (5-sigma total point source magnitudes in AB). The SIMPLE IRAC images are combined with the 10'x15' GOODS IRAC mosaics in the center. We give detailed descriptions of the observations, data reduction, and properties of the final images, as well as the detection and photometry methods used to build a catalog. Using published optical and near-infrared data from the Multiwavelength Survey by Yale-Chile (MUSYC), we construct an IRAC-selected catalog, containing photometry in UBVRIz'JHK, [3.6 um], [4.5 um], [5.8 um], and [8.0 um]. The catalog contains 43,782 sources with S/N > 5 at 3.6 um, 19,993 of which have 13-band photometry. We compare this catalog to the publicly available MUSYC and FIREWORKS catalogs and discuss the differences. Using a high signal-to-noise sub-sample of 3,391 sources with ([3.6] + [4.5])/2 < 21.2, we investigate the star formation rate history of massive galaxies out to z ~ 1.8. We find that at z ~ 1.8 at least 30% +/-7% of the most massive galaxies (Mstar > 10^11 Msol) are passively evolving, in agreement with earlier results from surveys covering less area.
  • We present a multi-wavelength study of galaxy populations in the core of the massive, X-ray luminous cluster XMMU J2235 at z=1.39, based on VLT and HST optical and near-infrared photometry. Luminosity functions in the z, H, and Ks bands show a faint-end slope consistent with being flat, and a characteristic magnitude M* close to passive evolution predictions of M* of local massive clusters, with a formation redshift z>2. The color-magnitude and color-mass diagrams show evidence of a tight red sequence of massive galaxies, with overall old stellar populations, generally early-type morphology, typically showing early-type spectral features and rest-frame far-UV emission consistent with very low star formation rates (SFR<0.2Msun/yr). Star forming spectroscopic members, with SFRs of up to ~100Msun/yr, are all located at clustercentric distances >~250kpc, with the central cluster region already appearing effectively quenched. Massive galaxies in the core of this cluster appear to be in an advanced evolutionary stage in terms of both star formation and mass assembly. The high-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function is essentially already in place, and the stellar mass fraction estimated within r500 (~1%, Kroupa IMF) is already similar to that of local massive clusters. On the other hand, morphological analysis of the massive red sequence galaxies suggests that they are smaller than similarly massive local early-types. While possibly affected by systematics and biases, this result might imply that, in spite of the overall early assembly of these sources, their evolution is not complete, and processes like minor (and likely dry) merging might still shape their structural properties to resemble those of their local counterparts, without substantially affecting their stellar mass or host stellar populations.[abridged]
  • With a complete, mass-selected sample of quiescent galaxies from the NEWFIRM Medium-Band Survey (NMBS), we study the stellar populations of the oldest and most massive galaxies (>10^11 Msun) to high redshift. The sample includes 570 quiescent galaxies selected based on their extinction-corrected U-V colors out to z=2.2, with accurate photometric redshifts, sigma_z/(1+z)~2%, and rest-frame colors, sigma_U-V~0.06 mag. We measure an increase in the intrinsic scatter of the rest-frame U-V colors of quiescent galaxies with redshift. This scatter in color arises from the spread in ages of the quiescent galaxies, where we see both relatively quiescent red, old galaxies and quiescent blue, younger galaxies towards higher redshift. The trends between color and age are consistent with the observed composite rest-frame spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these galaxies. The composite SEDs of the reddest and bluest quiescent galaxies are fundamentally different, with remarkably well-defined 4000A- and Balmer-breaks, respectively. Some of the quiescent galaxies may be up to 4 times older than the average age- and up to the age of the universe, if the assumption of solar metallicity is correct. By matching the scatter predicted by models that include growth of the red sequence by the transformation of blue galaxies to the observed intrinsic scatter, the data indicate that most early-type galaxies formed their stars at high redshift with a burst of star formation prior to migrating to the red sequence. The observed U-V color evolution with redshift is weaker than passive evolution predicts; possible mechanisms to slow the color evolution include increasing amounts of dust in quiescent galaxies towards higher redshift, red mergers at z<1, and a frosting of relatively young stars from star formation at later times.
  • We investigate the Spitzer/IRAC properties of 36 z~7 z-dropout galaxies and 3 z~8 Y-dropout galaxies derived from deep/wide-area WFC3/IR data of the Early Release Science, the ultradeep HUDF09, and wide-area NICMOS data. We fit stellar population synthesis models to the SEDs to derive mean redshifts, stellar masses, and ages. The z~7 galaxies are best characterized by substantial ages (>100 Myr) and M/L_V~0.2. The main trend with decreasing luminosity is that of bluing of the far-UV slope from beta~-2.0 to beta~-3.0. This can be explained by decreasing metallicity, except for the lowest luminosity galaxies (0.1 L*{z=3}), where low metallicity and smooth SFHs fail to match the blue far-UV and moderately red H-[3.6] color. Such colors may require episodic SFHs with short periods of activity and quiescence ("on-off" cycles) and/or a contribution from emission lines. The stellar mass of our sample of z~7 star forming galaxies correlates with SFR according to log M* = 8.70 (+-0.09) + 1.06(+-0.10) log SFR, implying star formation may have commenced at z>10. No galaxies are found with SFRs much higher or lower than the past averaged SFR suggesting that the typical star formation timescales are probably a substantial fraction of the Hubble time. We report the first IRAC detection of Y-dropout galaxies at z~8. The average rest-frame U-V=0.3 (AB) of the 3 galaxies are similar to faint z~7 galaxies, implying similar M/L. The stellar mass density to M_{UV,AB}<-18 is rho*(z=8) = 1.8^{+0.7}_{-1.0} x 10^6 M_sun Mpc^-3, following log rho*(z)= 10.6(+-0.6) - 4.4(+-0.7) log(1+z) [M_sun Mpc^-3] over 3<z< 8.
  • We use the ultra-deep WFC3/IR data over the HUDF and the Early Release Science WFC3/IR data over the CDF-South GOODS field to quantify the broadband spectral properties of candidate star-forming galaxies at z~7. We determine the UV-continuum slope beta in these galaxies, and compare the slopes with galaxies at later times to measure the evolution in beta. For luminous L*(z=3) galaxies, we measure a mean UV-continuum slope beta of -2.0+/-0.2, which is comparable to the beta~-2 derived at similar luminosities at z~5-6. However, for the lower luminosity 0.1L*(z=3) galaxies, we measure a mean beta of -3.0+/-0.2. This is substantially bluer than is found for similar luminosity galaxies at z~4, just 800 Myr later, and even at z~5-6. In principle, the observed beta of -3.0 can be matched by a very young, dust-free stellar population, but when nebular emission is included the expected beta becomes >~-2.7. To produce these very blue beta's (i.e., beta~-3), extremely low metallicities and mechanisms to reduce the red nebular emission are likely required. For example, a large escape fraction (i.e., f_{esc}>~0.3) could minimize the contribution from this red nebular emission. If this is correct and the escape fraction in faint z~7 galaxies is >~0.3, it may help to explain how galaxies reionize the universe.
  • We study the Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) mid-infrared (rest-frame optical) fluxes of 14 newly WFC3/IR-detected z=7 z_{850}-dropout galaxies and 5 z=8 Y_{105}-dropout galaxies. The WFC3/IR depth and spatial resolution allow accurate removal of contaminating foreground light, enabling reliable flux measurements at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron. None of the galaxies are detected to [3.6]=26.9 (AB, 2 sigma), but a stacking analysis reveals a robust detection for the z_{850}-dropouts and an upper limit for the Y_{105}-dropouts. We construct average broadband SEDs using the stacked ACS, WFC3, and IRAC fluxes and fit stellar population synthesis models to derive mean redshifts, stellar masses, and ages. For the z_{850}-dropouts, we find z=6.9^{+0.1}_{-0.1}, (U-V)_{rest}=0.4, reddening A_V=0, stellar mass M*=1.2^{+0.3}_{-0.6} x 10^9 M_sun (Salpeter IMF). The best-fit ages ~300Myr, M/L_V=0.2, and SSFR=1.7Gyr^{-1} are similar to values reported for luminous z=7 galaxies, indicating the galaxies are smaller but not younger. The sub-L* galaxies observed here contribute significantly to the stellar mass density and under favorable conditions may have provided enough photons for sustained reionization at 7<z<11. In contrast, the z=8.3^{+0.1}_{-0.2} Y_{105}-dropouts have stellar masses that are uncertain by 1.5 dex due to the near-complete reliance on far-UV data. Adopting the 2 sigma upper limit on the M/L(z=8), the stellar mass density to M_{UV,AB} < -18 declines from rho*(z=7)=3.7^{+1.0}_{-1.8} x 10^6 M_sun Mpc^{-3} to rho*(z=8) < 8 x 10^5 M_sun Mpc^{-3}, following (1+z)^{-6} over 3<z<8. Lower masses at z=8 would signify more dramatic evolution, which can be established with deeper IRAC observations, long before the arrival of the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present a first morphological study of z~7-8 Lyman Break galaxies (LBGs) from Oesch et al. 2009 and Bouwens et al. 2009 detected in ultra-deep near-infrared imaging of the Hubble Ultra Deep field (HUDF) by the HUDF09 program. With an average intrinsic size of 0.7+-0.3 kpc these galaxies are found to be extremely compact having an average observed surface brightness of mu_J ~= 26 mag arcsec^(-2), and only two out of the full sample of 16 z~7 galaxies show extended features with resolved double cores. By comparison to lower redshift LBGs it is found that only little size evolution takes place from z~7 to z~6, while galaxies between z~4-5 show more extended wings in their apparent profiles. The average size scales as (1+z)^(-m) with m=1.12+-0.17 for galaxies with luminosities in the range (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} and with m=1.32+-0.52 for (0.12-0.3)L*_{z=3}, consistent with galaxies having constant comoving sizes. The peak of the size distribution changes only slowly from z~7 to z~4. However, a tail of larger galaxies (>~ 1.2 kpc) is gradually built up towards later cosmic times, possibly via hierarchical build-up or via enhanced accretion of cold gas. Additionally, the average star-formation surface density of LBGs with luminosities (0.3-1)L*_{z=3} is nearly constant at Sigma_{SFR}=1.9 Msun/yr/kpc^2 over the entire redshift range z~4-7 suggesting similar star-formation efficiencies at these early epochs. The above evolutionary trends seem to hold out to z~8 though the sample is still small and possibly incomplete.
  • We present a sample of 16 robust z~7 z-drop galaxies detected by the newly installed WFC3/IR camera on the Hubble Space Telescope. Our analysis is based on the first epoch data of the HUDF09 program covering the Hubble Ultra Deep Field with 60 orbits of Y, J, and H observations. These remarkable data cover 4.7 arcmin^2 and are the deepest NIR images ever taken, reaching to ~29 mag AB (5 sigma). The 16 z~6.5-7.5 galaxies have been identified based on the Lyman Break technique utilizing (z-Y) vs. (Y-J) colors. They have magnitudes J = 26.0-29.0 (AB), an average apparent half-light radius of ~0.16 arcsec (<~1 kpc), and show very blue colors (some even beta<~-2.5), in particular at low luminosities. The WFC3/IR data confirms previous NICMOS detections indicating that the dropout selection at z~7 is very reliable. Our data allow a first determination of the faint end slope of the z~7 luminosity function, reaching down to M_UV ~ -18, a full magnitude fainter than previous measurements. When fixing phi*=1.4e-3/Mpc^3/mag to the value previously measured at z~6, we find a best-fit value of alpha=-1.77+-0.20, with a characteristic luminosity of M_*=-19.91+-0.09. This steep slope is similar to what is seen at z~2-6 and indicates that low luminosity galaxies could potentially provide adequate flux to reionize the universe. The remarkable depth and resolution of these new images provide insights into the coming power of JWST.
  • We select 25,000 galaxies from the NEWFIRM Medium Band Survey (NMBS) to study the rest-frame U-V color distribution of galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5. The five unique NIR filters of the NMBS enable the precise measurement of photometric redshifts and rest-frame colors for 9,900 galaxies at 1 < z < 2.5. The rest-frame U-V color distribution at all z<~2.5 is bimodal, with a red peak, a blue peak, and a population of galaxies in between (the green valley). Model fits to the optical-NIR SEDs and the distribution of MIPS-detected galaxies indicate that the colors of galaxies in the green valley are determined largely by the amount of reddening by dust. This result does not support the simplest interpretation of green valley objects as a transition from blue star-forming to red quiescent galaxies. We show that correcting the rest-frame colors for dust reddening allows a remarkably clean separation between the red and blue sequences up to z~2.5. Our study confirms that dusty starburst galaxies can contribute a significant fraction to red sequence samples selected on the basis of a single rest-frame color (i.e. U-V), so extra care must be taken if samples of truly "red and dead" galaxies are desired. Interestingly, of galaxies detected at 24 microns, 14% remain on the red sequence after applying the reddening correction.
  • We study the relation between size and star formation activity in a complete sample of 225 massive (M > 5 x 10^10 Msun) galaxies at 1.5<z<2.5, selected from the FIREWORKS UV-IR catalog of the CDFS. Based on stellar population synthesis model fits to the observed restframe UV-NIR SEDs, and independent MIPS 24 micron observations, 65% of galaxies are actively forming stars, while 35% are quiescent. Using sizes derived from 2D surface brightness profile fits to high resolution (FWHM_{PSF}~0.45 arcsec) groundbased ISAAC data, we confirm and improve the significance of the relation between star formation activity and compactness found in previous studies, using a large, complete mass-limited sample. At z~2, massive quiescent galaxies are significantly smaller than massive star forming galaxies, and a median factor of 0.34+/-0.02 smaller than galaxies of similar mass in the local universe. 13% of the quiescent galaxies are unresolved in the ISAAC data, corresponding to sizes <1 kpc, more than 5 times smaller than galaxies of similar mass locally. The quiescent galaxies span a Kormendy relation which, compared to the relation for local early types, is shifted to smaller sizes and brighter surface brightnesses and is incompatible with passive evolution. The progenitors of the quiescent galaxies, were likely dominated by highly concentrated, intense nuclear star bursts at z~3-4, in contrast to star forming galaxies at z~2 which are extended and dominated by distributed star formation.
  • We have compiled a sample of early-type cluster galaxies from 0 < z < 1.3 and measured the evolution of their ellipticity distributions. Our sample contains 487 galaxies in 17 z>0.3 clusters with high quality space-based imaging and a comparable sample of 210 galaxies in 10 clusters at z<0.05. We select early-type galaxies (elliptical and S0 galaxies) that fall within the cluster R_{200}, and which lie on the red-sequence in the magnitude range -19.3 > M_B > -21, after correcting for luminosity evolution. Our ellipticity measurements are made in a consistent manner over our whole sample. We perform extensive simulations to quantify the systematic and statistical errors, and find that it is crucial to use PSF-corrected model fits. We find that neither the median ellipticity, nor the shape of the ellipticity distribution of cluster early-type galaxies evolves with redshift from z ~ 0 to z > 1. These results are strongly suggestive of an unchanging overall bulge-to-disk ratio distribution for cluster early-type galaxies over the last ~8Gyr. This result contrasts with that from visual classifications which show that the fraction of morphologically-selected disk-dominated early-type galaxies, or S0s, is significantly lower at z>0.4 than at z~0. Taking the ellipticity measurements and assuming, as in all previous studies, that the intrinsic ellipticity distribution of both elliptical and S0 galaxies remains constant, then we conclude from the lack of evolution in the observed early-type ellipticity distribution that the relative fractions of ellipticals and S0s do not evolve from z~1 to z=0 for a red-sequence selected samples of galaxies in the cores of clusters of galaxies.
  • Using HST and Spitzer IRAC imaging, we report the discovery of a very bright strongly lensed Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidate at z~7.6 in the field of the massive galaxy cluster Abell 1689. The galaxy candidate, which we refer to as A1689-zD1, shows a strong z-J break of at least 2.2 mag and is completely undetected (<1 sigma) in HST/ACS g, r, i, and z-band data. These properties, combined with the very blue J-H and H-[4.5] colors, are exactly the properties of an z~7.6 LBG and can only be reasonably fit by a star-forming galaxy at z=7.6 +/- 0.4. Attempts to reproduce these properties with a model galaxy at z<4 yield particularly poor fits. A1689-zD1 has an observed (lensed) magnitude of 24.7 AB (8 sigma) in the NICMOS H band and is ~1.3 mag brighter than the brightest-known z-dropout galaxy. When corrected for the cluster magnification of 9.3 at z~7.6, the candidate has an intrinsic magnitude of H=27.1 AB, or about an L* galaxy at z~7.6. The source-plane deprojection shows that the star formation is occurring in compact knots of size ~<300 pc. The best-fit stellar population synthesis models yield a median redshift of 7.6, stellar masses (1.6-3.9) x 10^9 M_sun, stellar ages 45-320 Myr, star-formation rates ~<7.6 M_sun/yr, and low reddening with A_V <= 0.3. These properties are generally similar to those of LBGs found at z~5-6. The inferred stellar ages suggest a formation redshift of z~8-10 (t~<0.63 Gyr). A1689-zD1 is the brightest observed, highly reliable z>7.0 galaxy candidate found to date.