• The phenomenon of many-body localised (MBL) systems has attracted significant interest in recent years, for its intriguing implications from a perspective of both condensed-matter and statistical physics: they are insulators even at non-zero temperature and fail to thermalise, violating expectations from quantum statistical mechanics. What is more, recent seminal experimental developments with ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices constituting analog quantum simulators have pushed many-body localised systems into the realm of physical systems that can be measured with high accuracy. In this work, we introduce experimentally accessible witnesses that directly probe distinct features of MBL, distinguishing it from its Anderson counterpart. We insist on building our toolbox from techniques available in the laboratory, including on-site addressing, super-lattices, and time-of-flight measurements, identifying witnesses based on fluctuations, density-density correlators, densities, and entanglement. We build upon the theory of out of equilibrium quantum systems, in conjunction with tensor network and exact simulations, showing the effectiveness of the tools for realistic models.
  • In this work, we present a result on the non-equilibrium dynamics causing equilibration and Gaussification of quadratic non-interacting fermionic Hamiltonians. Specifically, based on two basic assumptions - clustering of correlations in the initial state and the Hamiltonian exhibiting delocalizing transport - we prove that non-Gaussian initial states become locally indistinguishable from fermionic Gaussian states after a short and well controlled time. This relaxation dynamics is governed by a power-law independent of the system size. Our argument is general enough to allow for pure and mixed initial states, including thermal and ground states of interacting Hamiltonians on and large classes of lattices as well as certain spin systems. The argument gives rise to rigorously proven instances of a convergence to a generalized Gibbs ensemble. Our results allow to develop an intuition of equilibration that is expected to be more generally valid and relates to current experiments of cold atoms in optical lattices.
  • Ultra-cold atoms in optical lattices provide one of the most promising platforms for analog quantum simulations of complex quantum many-body systems. Large-size systems can now routinely be reached and are already used to probe a large variety of different physical situations, ranging from quantum phase transitions to artificial gauge theories. At the same time, measurement techniques are still limited and full tomography for these systems seems out of reach. Motivated by this observation, we present a method to directly detect and quantify to what extent a quantum state deviates from a local Gaussian description, based on available noise correlation measurements from in-situ and time-of-flight measurements. This is an indicator of the significance of strong correlations in ground and thermal states, as Gaussian states are precisely the ground and thermal states of non-interacting models. We connect our findings, augmented by numerical tensor network simulations, to notions of equilibration, disordered systems and the suppression of transport in Anderson insulators.
  • Closed quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium pose several long-standing problems in physics. Recent years have seen a tremendous progress in approaching these questions, not least due to experiments with cold atoms and trapped ions in instances of quantum simulations. This article provides an overview on the progress in understanding dynamical equilibration and thermalisation of closed quantum many-body systems out of equilibrium due to quenches, ramps and periodic driving. It also addresses topics such as the eigenstate thermalisation hypothesis, typicality, transport, many-body localisation, universality near phase transitions, and prospects for quantum simulations.
  • Interacting quantum many-body systems are usually expected to thermalise, in the sense that the evolution of local expectation values approach a stationary value resembling a thermal ensemble. This intuition is notably contradicted in systems exhibiting many-body localisation, a phenomenon receiving significant recent attention. One of its most intriguing features is that, in stark contrast to the non-interacting case, entanglement of states grows without limit over time, albeit slowly. In this work, we establish a novel link between quantum information theory and notions of condensed matter, capturing the phenomenon in the Heisenberg picture. We show that the existence of local constants of motion, often taken as the defining property of many-body localisation, together with a generic spectrum, is sufficient to rigorously prove information propagation: These systems can be used to send a signal over arbitrary distances, in that the impact of a local perturbation can be detected arbitrarily far away. We perform a detailed perturbation analysis of quasi-local constants of motion and also show that they indeed can be used to construct efficient spectral tensor networks, as recently suggested. Our results provide a detailed and model-independent picture of information propagation in many-body localised systems.
  • The phenomenon of many-body localisation received a lot of attention recently, both for its implications in condensed-matter physics of allowing systems to be an insulator even at non-zero temperature as well as in the context of the foundations of quantum statistical mechanics, providing examples of systems showing the absence of thermalisation following out-of-equilibrium dynamics. In this work, we establish a novel link between dynamical properties - the absence of a group velocity and transport - with entanglement properties of individual eigenvectors. Using Lieb-Robinson bounds and filter functions, we prove rigorously under simple assumptions on the spectrum that if a system shows strong dynamical localisation, all of its many-body eigenvectors have clustering correlations. In one dimension this implies directly an entanglement area law, hence the eigenvectors can be approximated by matrix-product states. We also show this statement for parts of the spectrum, allowing for the existence of a mobility edge above which transport is possible.
  • The experimental realisation of large scale many-body systems has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. In order to work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. In this work, we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum field tomography. We employ our procedure to capture ultracold atomic systems using atom chips, a setup that allows for the quantum simulation of static and dynamical properties of interacting quantum fields. Our procedure is based on cMPS, the continuous analogues of matrix product states (MPS), ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. The reconstruction procedure is based on two- and four-point correlation functions, from which we predict higher-order correlation functions, thus validating our reconstruction for the experimental situation at hand. We apply our procedure to quenched prethermalisation experiments for quasi-condensates. In this setting, we can use the quality of our tomographic reconstruction as a probe for the non-equilibrium nature of the involved physical processes. We discuss the potential of such methods in the context of partial verification of analogue quantum simulators.
  • The dynamics of quantum phase transitions poses one of the most challenging problems in modern many-body physics. Here, we study a prototypical example in a clean and well-controlled ultracold atom setup by observing the emergence of coherence when crossing the Mott insulator to superfluid quantum phase transition. In the one-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we find perfect agreement between experimental observations and numerical simulations for the resulting coherence length. We thereby perform a largely certified analogue quantum simulation of this strongly correlated system reaching beyond the regime of free quasiparticles. Experimentally, we additionally explore the emergence of coherence in higher dimensions where no classical simulations are available, as well as for negative temperatures. For intermediate quench velocities, we observe a power-law behaviour of the coherence length, reminiscent of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. However, we find exponents that strongly depend on the final interaction strength and thus lie outside the scope of this mechanism.