• Organic chromophores with heteroatoms possess an important excited state relaxation channel from an optically allowed {\pi}{\pi}* to a dark n{\pi}*state. We exploit the element and site specificity of soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to selectively follow the electronic change during the {\pi}{\pi}*/n{\pi}* internal conversion. As a hole forms in the n orbital during {\pi}{\pi}*/n{\pi}* internal conversion, the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum at the heteroatom K-edge exhibits an additional resonance. We demonstrate the concept with the nucleobase thymine, a prototypical heteroatomic chromophore. With the help of time resolved NEXAFS spectroscopy at the oxygen K-edge, we unambiguously show that {\pi}{\pi}*/n{\pi}* internal conversion takes place within (60 \pm 30) fs. High-level coupled cluster calculations on the isolated molecules used in the experiment confirm the superb electronic structure sensitivity of this new method for excited state investigations.
  • We present a new method for ultrafast spectroscopy of molecular photoexcited dynamics. The technique uses a pair of femtosecond pulses: a photoexcitation pulse initiating excited state dynamics followed by a soft x-ray (SXR) probe pulse that core ionizes certain atoms inside the molecule. We observe the Auger decay of the core hole as a function of delay between the photoexcitation and SXR pulses. The core hole decay is particularly sensitive to the local valence electrons near the core and shows new types of propensity rules, compared to dipole selection rules in SXR absorption or emission spectroscopy. We apply the delayed ultrafast x-ray Auger probing (DUXAP) method to the specific problem of nucleobase photoprotection to demonstrate its potential. The ultraviolet photoexcited \pi\pi* states of nucleobases are prone to chemical reactions with neighboring bases. To avoid this, the single molecules funnel the \pi\pi* population to lower lying electronic states on an ultrafast timescale under violation of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The new type of propensity rule, which is confirmed by Auger decay simulations, allows us to have increased sensitivity on the direct relaxation from the \pi\pi* state to the vibrationally hot electronic ground state. For the nucleobase thymine, we measure a decay constant of 300 fs in agreement with previous quantum chemical simulations.
  • We study the influence of phase matching on interference minima in high harmonic spectra. We concentrate on structures in atoms due to interference of different angular momentum channels during recombination. We use the Cooper minimum (CM) in argon at 47 eV as a marker in the harmonic spectrum. We measure 2d harmonic spectra in argon as a function of wavelength and angular divergence. While we identify a clear CM in the spectrum when the target gas jet is placed after the laser focus, we find that the appearance of the CM varies with angular divergence and can even be completely washed out when the gas jet is placed closer to the focus. We also show that the argon CM appears at different wavelengths in harmonic and photo-absorption spectra measured under conditions independent of any wavelength calibration. We model the experiment with a simulation based on coupled solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation and the Maxwell wave equation, including both the single atom response and macroscopic effects of propagation. The single atom calculations confirm that the ground state of argon can be represented by its field free $p$ symmetry, despite the strong laser field used in high harmonic generation. Because of this, the CM structure in the harmonic spectrum can be described as the interference of continuum $s$ and $d$ channels, whose relative phase jumps by $\pi$ at the CM energy, resulting in a minimum shifted from the photoionization result. We also show that the full calculations reproduce the dependence of the CM on the macroscopic conditions. We calculate simple phase matching factors as a function of harmonic order and explain our experimental and theoretical observation in terms of the effect of phase matching on the shape of the harmonic spectrum. Phase matching must be taken into account to fully understand spectral features related to HHG spectroscopy.