• The ability to directly follow and time resolve the rearrangement of the nuclei within molecules is a frontier of science that requires atomic spatial and few-femtosecond temporal resolutions. While laser induced electron diffraction can meet these requirements, it was recently concluded that molecules with particular orbital symmetries (such as {\pi}g) cannot be imaged using purely backscattering electron wave packets without molecular alignment. Here, we demonstrate, in direct contradiction to these findings, that the orientation and shape of molecular orbitals presents no impediment for retrieving molecular structure with adequate sampling of the momentum transfer space. We overcome previous issues by showcasing retrieval of the structure of randomly oriented O2 and C2H2 molecules, with {\pi}g and {\pi}u symmetries, respectively, and where their ionisation probabilities do not maximise along their molecular axes. While this removes a serious bottleneck for laser induced diffraction imaging, we find unexpectedly strong back scattering contributions from low-Z atoms.
  • We present the first experimental data on strong-field ionization of atomic hydrogen by few-cycle laser pulses. We obtain quantitative agreement at the 10% level between the data and an {\it ab initio} simulation over a wide range of laser intensities and electron energies.
  • We report 32% efficient frequency doubling of single frequency 1029 nm light to green light at 514.5 nm using a single pass configuration. A congruent composition, periodically poled magnesium doped lithium niobate (PPMgLN) crystal of 50 mm length was used to generate a second harmonic power of 2.3 W. To our knowledge, this is the highest reported frequency doubling efficiency of any wavelength light in a PPMgLN crystal and also the highest reported SHG output power in the green for PPMgLN.