• The detection and subsequent characterisation of exoplanets are intimately linked to the characteristics of their host star. Therefore, it is necessary to study the star in detail in order to understand the formation history and characteristics of their companion(s). Our aims were to develop a community tool that allows the automated calculation of stellar parameters for a large number of stars, using high resolution echelle spectra and minimal photometric magnitudes, and introduce the first results in this work. We measured the equivalent widths of several iron lines and used them to solve the radiative transfer equation assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium to obtain the atmospheric parameters ($T_{\text{eff}}$, [Fe/H], logg and $\xi_t$). We used these values to derive the abundance of 11 chemical elements in the stellar photosphere (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu and Zn). Rotation and macroturbulent velocity were obtained using temperature calibrators and synthetic line profiles to match the observed spectra of five absorption lines. Finally, by interpolating in a grid of MIST isochrones, we derived the mass, radius and age using a Bayesian approach. SPECIES obtains bulk parameters that are in good agreement with measured values from different existing catalogues, including when different methods are used to derive them. We find excellent agreement with previous works that used similar methodologies. We find discrepancies in the chemical abundances for some elements with respect to other works, which could be produced by differences in $T_{\text{eff}}$, or in the line list or the atomic line data used to derive them. We also obtained analytic relations to describe the correlations between different parameters, and we implemented new methods to better handle these correlations, which provides a better description of the uncertainties associated with the measurements.
  • We report the discovery of two hot Jupiters orbiting the stars EPIC229426032 and EPIC246067459. We used photometry data from Campaign 11 and 12 of the Kepler (K2) Mission, as well as radial velocity data obtained using the HARPS, FEROS, and CORALIE spectrographs. EPIC229426032 b and EPIC246067459 b have masses of $1.36^{+0.10}_{-0.10}$ and $0.86^{+0.13}_{-0.12}\,R_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, radii of $1.63^{+0.07}_{-0.08}$ and $1.30^{+0.15}_{-0.14}\,M_{\mathrm{Jup}}$, and are orbiting their host stars in 2.18 and 3.2 day orbits, respectively. The large radius of EPIC229426032 b leads us to conclude that this corresponds to a highly inflated hot Jupiter. EPIC2460674559 b has a radius consistent with theoretical models, considering the high incident flux falling on the planet. Both of these discoveries represent excellent laboratories to study the physics of planetary atmospheres, and the factors playing a role in planetary infation, as well as planet formation and evolution. EPIC229426032 b is particularly favourable for follow-up studies, since not only is it very inflated, but it also orbits a relatively bright star ($V = 11.6$).
  • Although the majority of radial velocity detected planets have been found orbiting solar-type stars, a fraction of them have been discovered around giant stars. These planetary systems have revealed different orbital properties when compared to solar-type stars companions. In particular, radial velocity surveys have shown that there is a lack of giant planets in close-in orbits around giant stars, in contrast to the known population of hot-Jupiters orbiting solar-type stars. The reason of this distinctive feature in the semimajor-axis distribution has been theorized to be the result of the stellar evolution and/or due to the effect of a different formation/evolution scenario for planets around intermediate-mass stars. However, in the past few years, a handful of transiting short-period planets (P$\lesssim$ 10 days) have been found around giant stars, thanks to the high precision photometric data obtained initially by the Kepler mission, and later by its two-wheels extension K2. These new discoveries, have allowed us for the first time to study the orbital properties and physical parameters of these intriguing and elusive sub-stellar companions. In this paper we report on an independent discovery of a transiting planet in field 10 of the K2 mission, also reported recently by Grunblatt et al. (2017). The main orbital parameters of EPIC\,228754001\,$b$, obtained with all the available data for the system, are the following: $P$ = 9.1708 $\pm$ 0.0025 $d$, $e$ = 0.290 $\pm$ 0.049, Mp = 0.495 $\pm$ 0.007 Mjup \,and Rp = 1.089 $\pm$ 0.006 Rjup. This is the fifth known planet orbiting any giant star with $a < 0.1$, and the most eccentric one among them, making EPIC\,228754001\,$b$ a very interesting object.
  • A recent reanalysis of archival data has lead several authors to arrive at strikingly different conclusions for a number of planet-hosting candidate stars. In particular, some radial velocities measured using FEROS spectra have been shown to be inaccurate, throwing some doubt on the validity of a number of planet detections. Motivated by these results, we have begun the Reanalysis of Archival FEROS specTra (RAFT) program and here we discuss the first results from this work. We have reanalyzed FEROS data for the stars HD 11977, HD 47536, HD 70573, HD 110014 and HD 122430, all of which are claimed to have at least one planetary companion. We have reduced the raw data and computed the radial velocity variations of these stars, achieving a long-term precision of $\sim$ 10 m/s on the known stable star tau Ceti, and in good agreement with the residuals to our fits. We confirm the existence of planets around HD 11977, HD 47536 and HD 110014, but with different orbital parameters than those previously published. In addition, we found no evidence of the second planet candidate around HD 47536, nor any companions orbiting HD 122430 and HD 70573. Finally, we report the discovery of a second planet around HD 110014, with a minimum mass of 3.1 Mjup and a orbital period of 130 days. Analysis of activity indicators allow us to confirm the reality of our results and also to measure the impact of magnetic activity on our radial velocity measurements. These results confirm that very metal-poor stars down to [Fe/H]$\sim$ -0.7 dex, can indeed form giant planets given the right conditions.