• A one-dimensional model of bosons with repulsive short-range interactions, solved analytically by Lieb and Liniger many years ago, predicts existence of two branches of elementary excitations. One of them represents Bogoliubov phonons, the other, as suggested by some authors, might be related to dark solitons. On the other hand, it has been already demonstrated within a framework of the classical field approximation that quasi-one-dimensional interacting Bose gas at equilibrium exhibits excitations which are phonons and dark solitons. By showing that statistical distributions of dark solitons obtained within the classical field approximation match the distributions of quasiparticles of the second kind derived from fully quantum description we demonstrate that type II excitations in the Lieb-Liniger model are, indeed, quantum solitons.
  • Solitons, or non-destructible local disturbances, are important features of many one-dimensional (1D) nonlinear wave phenomena, from water waves in narrow canals to light pulses in optical fibers. In ultra-cold gases, they have long been sought, and were first observed to be generated by phase-imprinting. More recently, their spontaneous formation in 1D gases was predicted as a result of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, rapid evaporative cooling, and dynamical processes after a quantum quench. Here we show that they actually occur generically in the thermal equilibrium state of a weakly-interacting elongated Bose gas, without the need for external forcing or perturbations. This reveals a major new quality to the experimentally widespread quasicondensate state. It can be understood via thermal occupation of the famous and somewhat elusive Type II excitations in the Lieb-Liniger model of a uniform 1D gas.
  • We study a Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian of ultracold two component gas of spinor Chromium atoms. Dipolar interactions of magnetic moments while tuned resonantly by ultralow magnetic field can lead to spin flipping. Due to approximate axial symmetry of individual lattice site, total angular momentum is conserved. Therefore, all changes of the spin are accompanied by the appearance of the angular orbital momentum. This way excited Wannier states with non vanishing angular orbital momentum can be created. Resonant dipolar coupling of the two component Bose gas introduces additional degree of control of the system, and leads to a variety of different stable phases. The phase diagram for small number of particles is discussed.
  • We calculate the evaporative cooling dynamics of trapped one-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates for parameters leading to a range of condensates and quasicondensates in the final equilibrium state. We confirm that solitons are created during the evaporation process, but always eventually dissipate during thermalisation. The distance between solitons at the end of the evaporation ramp matches the coherence length in the final thermal state. Calculations were made using the classical fields method. They bridge the gap between the phase defect picture of the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and the long-wavelength phase fluctuations in the thermal state.
  • Fluctuations of the number of condensed atoms in a finite-size, weakly interacting Bose gas confined in a box potential are investigated for temperatures up to the critical region. The canonical partition functions are evaluated using a recursive scheme for smaller systems, and a saddle-point approximation for larger samples, that allows to treat realistic size systems containing up to $N \sim 10^5$ particles. We point out the importance of particle-number constrain and interactions between out of condensate atoms for the statistics near the critical region. For sufficiently large systems the crossover from the anomalous to normal scaling of the fluctuations is observed. The excitations are described in a self-consistent way within the Bogoliubov-Popov approximation, and the interactions between thermal atoms are described by means of the Hartree-Fock method.
  • We consider the stability of a mixture of degenerate Bose and Fermi gases. Even though the bosons effectively repel each other the mixture can still collapse provided the Bose and Fermi gases attract each other strongly enough. For a given number of atoms and the strengths of the interactions between them we find the geometry of a maximally compact trap that supports the stable mixture. We compare a simple analytical estimation for the critical axial frequency of the trap with results based on the numerical solution of hydrodynamic equations for Bose-Fermi mixture.
  • We theoretically consider the formation of bright solitons in a mixture of Bose and Fermi degenerate gases. While we assume the forces between atoms in a pure Bose component to be effectively repulsive, their character can be changed from repulsive to attractive in the presence of fermions provided the Bose and Fermi gases attract each other strongly enough. In such a regime the Bose component becomes a gas of effectively attractive atoms. Hence, generating bright solitons in the bosonic gas is possible. Indeed, after a sudden increase of the strength of attraction between bosons and fermions (realized by using a Feshbach resonance technique or by firm radial squeezing of both samples) soliton trains appear in the Bose-Fermi mixture.
  • We review our version of the classical field approximation to the dynamics of a finite temperature Bose gas. In the case of a periodic box potential, we investigate the role of the high momentum cut-off, essential in the method. In particular, we show that the cut-off going to infinity limit decribes the particle number going to infinity with the scattering length going to zero. In this weak interaction limit, the relative population of the condensate tends to unity. We also show that the cross-over energy, at which the probability distribution of the condensate occupation changes its character, grows with a growing scattering length. In the more physical case of the condensate in the harmonic trap we investigate the dissipative dynamics of a vortex. We compare the decay time and the velocities of the vortex with the available analytic estimates.
  • We present a convenient technique describing the condensate in dynamical equilibrium with the thermal cloud, at temperatures close to the critical one. We show that the whole isolated system may be viewed as a single classical field undergoing nonlinear dynamics leading to a steady state. In our procedure it is the observation process and the finite detection time that allow for splitting the system into the condensate and the thermal cloud.
  • We analyze the coherent multi-mode dynamics of a system of coupled atomic and molecular Bose gases. Starting from an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate with a small thermal component, we observe a complete depletion of the atomic and molecular condensate modes on a short time scale due to significant population of excited states. Giant coherent oscillations between the two condensates for typical parameters are almost completely suppressed. Our results cast serious doubts on the common use of the 2-mode model for description of coupled ultracold atomic-molecular systems and should be considered when planning future experiments with ultracold molecules.
  • We study the equilibrium dynamics of a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in a box. In our approach we use a semiclassical approximation similar to the description of a multi-mode laser. In dynamical equations derived from a full N-body quantum Hamiltonian we substitute all creation (and annihilation) operators (of a particle in a given box state) by appropriate c-number amplitudes. The set of nonlinear equations obtained in this way is solved numerically. We show that on the time scale of a few miliseconds the system exhibits relaxation - reaches an equilibrium with populations of different eigenstates fluctuating around their mean values.
  • We demonstrate numerically the efficient generation of vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) by using a ``phase imprinting'' method. The method consist of passing a far off resonant laser pulse through an absorption plate with azimuthally dependent absorption coefficient, imaging the laser beam onto a BEC, and thus creating the corresponding non-dissipative Stark shift potential and condensate phase shift. In our calculations we take into account experimental imperfections. We also propose an interference method to detect vortices by coherently pushing part of the condensate using optically induced Bragg scattering.