• The DustPedia project is capitalising on the legacy of the Herschel Space Observatory, using cutting-edge modelling techniques to study dust in the 875 DustPedia galaxies - representing the vast majority of extended galaxies within 3000 km s$^{-1}$ that were observed by Herschel. This work requires a database of multiwavelength imagery and photometry that greatly exceeds the scope (in terms of wavelength coverage and number of galaxies) of any previous local-Universe survey. We constructed a database containing our own custom Herschel reductions, along with standardised archival observations from GALEX, SDSS, DSS, 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, and Planck. Using these data, we performed consistent aperture-matched photometry, which we combined with external supplementary photometry from IRAS and Planck. We present our multiwavelength imagery and photometry across 42 UV-microwave bands for the 875 DustPedia galaxies. Our aperture-matched photometry, combined with the external supplementary photometry, represents a total of 21,857 photometric measurements. A typical DustPedia galaxy has multiwavelength photometry spanning 25 bands. We also present the Comprehensive & Adaptable Aperture Photometry Routine (CAAPR), the pipeline we developed to carry out our aperture-matched photometry. CAAPR is designed to produce consistent photometry for the enormous range of galaxy and observation types in our data. In particular, CAAPR is able to determine robust cross-compatible uncertainties, thanks to a novel method for reliably extrapolating the aperture noise for observations that cover a very limited amount of background. Our rich database of imagery and photometry is being made available to the community
  • The purpose of this work is the characterization of the radial distribution of dust, stars, gas, and star-formation rate (SFR) in a sub-sample of 18 face-on spiral galaxies extracted from the DustPedia sample. This study is performed by exploiting the multi-wavelength, from UV to sub-mm bands, DustPedia database, in addition to molecular (12CO) and atomic (HI) gas maps and metallicity abundance information available in the literature. We fitted the surface brightness profiles of the tracers of dust and stars, the mass surface density profiles of dust, stars, molecular gas, and total gas, and the SFR surface density profiles with an exponential curve and derived their scale-lengths. We also developed a method to solve for the CO-to-H2 conversion factor (alpha_CO) per galaxy by using dust and gas mass profiles. Although each galaxy has its own peculiar behaviour, we identified a common trend of the exponential scale-lengths vs. wavelength. On average, the scale-lengths normalized to the B-band 25 mag/arcsec^2 radius decrease from UV to 70 micron, from 0.4 to 0.2, and then increase back up to 0.3 at 500 microns. The main result is that, on average, the dust mass surface density scale-length is about 1.8 times the stellar one derived from IRAC data and the 3.6 micron surface brightness, and close to that in the UV. We found a mild dependence of the scale-lengths on the Hubble stage T: the scale-lengths of the Herschel bands and the 3.6 micron scale-length tend to increase from earlier to later types, the scale-length at 70 micron tends to be smaller than that at longer sub-mm wavelength with ratios between longer sub-mm wavelengths and 70 micron that decrease with increasing T. The scale-length ratio of SFR and stars shows a weak increasing trend towards later types.
  • Extragalactic observations of water emission can provide valuable insights into the excitation of the interstellar medium. In addition, extragalactic megamasers are powerful probes of kinematics close to active nuclei. Therefore, it is paramount to determine the true origin of the water emission, whether it is excited by processes close to an AGN or in star-forming regions. We use ALMA Band 5 science verification observations to analyse the emission of the 183 GHz water line in Arp 220 on sub-arcsecond scales, in conjunction with new ALMA Band 7 data at 325 GHz. Specifically, the nature of the process leading to the excitation of emission at these water lines is studied in this context. Supplementary 22 GHz VLA observations are used to better constrain the parameter space in the excitation modelling of the water lines. We detect 183 GHz H2O and 325 GHz water emission towards the two compact nuclei at the center of Arp 220, being brighter in Arp 220 West. The emission at these two frequencies is compared to previous single-dish data and does not show evidence of variability. The 183 and 325 GHz lines show similar spectra and kinematics, but the 22 GHz profile is significantly different in both nuclei due to a blend with an NH3 absorption line. Our findings suggest that the most likely scenario to cause the observed water emission in Arp 220 is a large number of independent masers originating from numerous star-forming regions.
  • We present an update to the ultraviolet-to-radio database of global broadband photometry for the 79 nearby galaxies that comprise the union of the KINGFISH (Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel) and SINGS (Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey) samples. The 34-band dataset presented here includes contributions from observational work carried out with a variety of facilities including GALEX, SDSS, PS, NOAO, 2MASS, WISE, Spitzer, Herschel, Planck, JCMT, and the VLA. Improvements of note include recalibrations of previously-published SINGS BVRcIc and KINGFISH far-infrared/submillimeter photometry. Similar to previous results in the literature, an excess of submillimeter emission above model predictions is seen primarily for low-metallicity dwarf/irregular galaxies. This 34-band photometric dataset for the combined KINGFISH$+$SINGS sample serves as an important multi-wavelength reference for the variety of galaxies observed at low redshift. A thorough analysis of the observed spectral energy distributions is carried out in a companion paper.
  • Dynamic and thermal processes regulate the structure of the multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM), and ultimately establish how galaxies evolve through star formation. Thus, to constrain ISM models and better understand the interplay of these processes, it is of great interest to measure the thermal pressure ($P_{\rm th}$) of the diffuse, neutral gas. By combining [C II] 158 $\mu$m, HI, and CO data from 31 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH sample, we have measured thermal pressures in 534 predominantly atomic regions with typical sizes of $\sim$1 kiloparsec. We find a distribution of thermal pressures in the $P_{\rm th}/k\sim10^3-10^5$ K cm$^{-3}$ range. For a sub-sample of regions with conditions similar to those of the diffuse, neutral gas in the Galactic plane, we find thermal pressures that follow a log-normal distribution with a median value of $P_{\rm th}/k\approx3600$ K cm$^{-3}$. These results are consistent with thermal pressure measurements using other observational methods. We find that $P_{\rm th}$ increases with radiation field strength and star formation activity, as expected from the close link between the heating of the gas and the star formation rate. Our thermal pressure measurements fall in the regime where a two-phase ISM with cold and warm neutral medium could exist in pressure equilibrium. Finally, we find that the midplane thermal pressure of the diffuse gas is about $\sim30$% of the vertical weight of the overlying ISM, consistent with results from hydrodynamical simulations of self-regulated star formation in galactic disks.
  • We study the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the radio continuum emission from the KINGFISH sample of nearby galaxies to understand the energetics and origin of this emission. Effelsberg multi-wavelength observations at 1.4GHz, 4.8GHz, 8.5GHz, and 10.5GHz combined with archive data allow us, for the first time, to determine the mid-radio continuum (1-10 GHz, MRC) bolometric luminosities and further present calibration relations vs. the monochromatic radio luminosities. The 1-10 GHz radio SED is fitted using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique leading to measurements for the nonthermal spectral index and the thermal fraction f_th with mean values of alpha_nt=0.97+-0.16 (0.79+-0.15 for the total spectral index) and f_th= 10% +- 9% at 1.4 GHz. The MRC luminosity changes over ~3 orders of magnitude in the sample. The thermal emission is responsible for ~23% of the MRC on average. We also compare the extinction-corrected diagnostics of star formation rate with the thermal and nonthermal radio tracers and derive the first star formation calibration relations using the MRC radio luminosity. The nonthermal spectral index flattens with increasing star formation rate surface density, indicating the effect of the star formation feedback on the cosmic ray electron population in galaxies. Comparing the radio and IR SEDs, we find that the FIR-to-MRC ratio could decrease with star formation rate, due to the amplification of the magnetic fields in star forming regions. This particularly implies a decrease in the ratio at high redshifts, where mostly luminous/star forming galaxies are detected.
  • The radiation of stars heats dust grains in the diffuse interstellar medium and in star-forming regions in galaxies. Modelling this interaction provides information on dust in galaxies, a vital ingredient for their evolution. It is not straightforward to identify the stellar populations heating the dust, and to link attenuation to emission on a sub-galactic scale. Radiative transfer models are able to simulate this dust-starlight interaction in a realistic, three-dimensional setting. We investigate the dust heating mechanisms on a local and global galactic scale, using the Andromeda galaxy (M31) as our laboratory. We perform a series of panchromatic radiative transfer simulations of Andromeda with our code SKIRT. The high inclination angle of M31 complicates the 3D modelling and causes projection effects. However, the observed morphology and flux density are reproduced fairly well from UV to sub-millimeter wavelengths. Our model reveals a realistic attenuation curve, compatible with previous, observational estimates. We find that the dust in M31 is mainly (91 % of the absorbed luminosity) heated by the evolved stellar populations. The bright bulge produces a strong radiation field and induces non-local heating up to the main star-forming ring at 10 kpc. The relative contribution of unevolved stellar populations to the dust heating varies strongly with wavelength and with galactocentric distance.The dust heating fraction of unevolved stellar populations correlates strongly with NUV-r colour and specific star formation rate. These two related parameters are promising probes for the dust heating sources at a local scale.
  • The European Space Agency has invested heavily in two cornerstones missions; Herschel and Planck. The legacy data from these missions provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to study cosmic dust in galaxies so that we can answer fundamental questions about, for example: the origin of the chemical elements, physical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), its effect on stellar radiation, its relation to star formation and how this relates to the cosmic far infrared background. In this paper we describe the DustPedia project, which is enabling us to develop tools and computer models that will help us relate observed cosmic dust emission to its physical properties (chemical composition, size distribution, temperature), to its origins (evolved stars, super novae, growth in the ISM) and the processes that destroy it (high energy collisions and shock heated gas). To carry out this research we will combine the Herschel/Planck data with that from other sources of data, providing observations at numerous wavelengths (< 41) across the spectral energy distribution, thus creating the DustPedia database. To maximise our spatial resolution and sensitivity to cosmic dust we limit our analysis to 4231 local galaxies (v < 3000 km/s) selected via their near infrared luminosity (stellar mass). To help us interpret the data we have developed a new physical model for dust (THEMIS), a new Bayesian method of fitting and interpreting spectral energy distributions (HerBIE) and a state-of-the-art Monte Carlo photon tracing radiative transfer model (SKIRT). In this the first of the DustPedia papers we describe the project objectives, data sets used and provide an insight into the new scientific methods we plan to implement.
  • We present a line survey of the ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp 220, taken with the newly installed SEPIA Band 5 instrument on APEX. We illustrate the capacity of SEPIA to detect the 183.3 GHz H2O 31,3-22,0 line against the atmospheric H2O absorption feature. We confirm the previous detection of the HCN(2-1) line, and detect new transitions of standard dense gas tracers such as HNC(2-1), HCO+(2-1), CS(4-3), C34S(4-3), HC3N(20-19). We also detect HCN(2-1) v2=1 and the 193.5 GHz methanol (4-3) group for the first time. The absence of time variations in the megamaser water line compared to previous observations seems to rule out an AGN nuclear origin for the line. It could, on the contrary, favor a thermal origin instead, but also possibly be a sign that the megamaser emission is associated with star-forming cores washed-out in the beam. We finally discuss how the new transitions of HCN, HNC, HCO+ refine our knowledge of the ISM physical conditions in Arp 220.
  • The [NII] 122 and 205 \mu m transitions are powerful tracers of the ionized gas in the interstellar medium. By combining data from 21 galaxies selected from the Herschel KINGFISH and Beyond the Peak surveys, we have compiled 141 spatially resolved regions with a typical size of ~1 kiloparsec, with observations of both [NII] far-infrared lines. We measure [NII] 122/205 line ratios in the ~0.6-6 range, which corresponds to electron gas densities $n_e$~1-300 cm$^{-3}$, with a median value of $n_e$=30 cm$^{-3}$. Variations in the electron density within individual galaxies can be as a high as a factor of ~50, frequently with strong radial gradients. We find that $n_e$ increases as a function of infrared color, dust-weighted mean starlight intensity, and star formation rate surface density ($\Sigma_{SFR}$). As the intensity of the [NII] transitions is related to the ionizing photon flux, we investigate their reliability as tracers of the star formation rate (SFR). We derive relations between the [NII] emission and SFR in the low-density limit and in the case of a log-normal distribution of densities. The scatter in the correlation between [NII] surface brightness and $\Sigma_{SFR}$ can be understood as a property of the $n_e$ distribution. For regions with $n_e$ close to or higher than the [NII] line critical densities, the low-density limit [NII]-based SFR calibration systematically underestimates the SFR since [NII] emission is collisionally quenched. Finally, we investigate the relation between [NII] emission, SFR, and $n_e$ by comparing our observations to predictions from the MAPPINGS-III code.
  • To compute the SFR of galaxies from the rest-frame UV it is essential to take into account the obscuration by dust. To do so, one of the most popular methods consists in combining the UV with the emission from the dust itself in the IR. Yet, different studies have derived different estimators, showing that no such hybrid estimator is truly universal. In this paper we aim at understanding and quantifying what physical processes drive the variations between different hybrid estimators. Doing so, we aim at deriving new universal UV+IR hybrid estimators to correct the UV for dust attenuation, taking into account the intrinsic physical properties of galaxies. We use the CIGALE code to model the spatially-resolved FUV to FIR SED of eight nearby star-forming galaxies drawn from the KINGFISH sample. This allows us to determine their local physical properties, and in particular their UV attenuation, average SFR, average specific SFR (sSFR), and their stellar mass. We then examine how hybrid estimators depend on said properties. We find that hybrid UV+IR estimators strongly depend on the stellar mass surface density (in particular at 70 and 100 micron) and on the sSFR (in particular at 24 micron and the TIR). Consequently, the IR scaling coefficients for UV obscuration can vary by almost an order of magnitude. This result contrasts with other groups who found relatively constant coefficients with small deviations. We exploit these variations to construct a new class of hybrid estimators based on observed UV to near-IR colours and near-IR luminosity densities per unit area. We find that they can reliably be extended to entire galaxies. The new estimators provide better estimates of attenuation-corrected UV emission than classical hybrid estimators. Naturally taking into account the variable impact of dust heated by old stellar populations, they constitute a step towards universal estimators.
  • We combine Spitzer and Herschel data of the star-forming region N11 in the Large Magellanic Cloud to produce detailed maps of the dust properties in the complex and study their variations with the ISM conditions. We also compare APEX/LABOCA 870um observations with our model predictions in order to decompose the 870um emission into dust and non-dust (free-free emission and CO(3-2) line) contributions. We find that in N11, the 870um can be fully accounted for by these 3 components. The dust surface density map of N11 is combined with HI and CO observations to study local variations in the gas-to-dust mass ratios. Our analysis leads to values lower than those expected from the LMC low-metallicity as well as to a decrease of the gas-to-dust mass ratio with the dust surface density. We explore potential hypotheses that could explain the low observed gas-to-dust mass ratios (variations in the XCO factor, presence of CO-dark gas or of optically thick HI or variations in the dust abundance in the dense regions). We finally decompose the local SEDs using a Principal Component Analysis (i.e. with no a priori assumption on the dust composition in the complex). Our results lead to a promising decomposition of the local SEDs in various dust components (hot, warm, cold) coherent with that expected for the region. Further analysis on a larger sample of galaxies will follow in order to understand how unique this decomposition is or how it evolves from one environment to another.
  • In this work, we aim at providing a consistent analysis of the dust properties from metal-poor to metal-rich environments by linking them to fundamental galactic parameters. We consider two samples of galaxies: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey (DGS) and KINGFISH, totalling 109 galaxies, spanning almost 2 dex in metallicity. We collect infrared (IR) to submillimetre (submm) data for both samples and present the complete data set for the DGS sample. We model the observed spectral energy distributions (SED) with a physically-motivated dust model to access the dust properties. Using a different SED model (modified blackbody), dust composition (amorphous carbon), or wavelength coverage at submm wavelengths results in differences in the dust mass estimate of a factor two to three, showing that this parameter is subject to non-negligible systematic modelling uncertainties. For eight galaxies in our sample, we find a rather small excess at 500 microns (< 1.5 sigma). We find that the dust SED of low-metallicity galaxies is broader and peaks at shorter wavelengths compared to more metal-rich systems, a sign of a clumpier medium in dwarf galaxies. The PAH mass fraction and the dust temperature distribution are found to be driven mostly by the specific star-formation rate, SSFR, with secondary effects from metallicity. The correlations between metallicity and dust mass or total-IR luminosity are direct consequences of the stellar mass-metallicity relation. The dust-to-stellar mass ratios of metal-rich sources follow the well-studied trend of decreasing ratio for decreasing SSFR. The relation is more complex for highly star-forming low-metallicity galaxies and depends on the chemical evolutionary stage of the source (i.e., gas-to-dust mass ratio). Dust growth processes in the ISM play a key role in the dust mass build-up with respect to the stellar content at high SSFR and low metallicity. (abridged)
  • The far-infrared (FIR) lines are key tracers of the physical conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM) and are becoming workhorse diagnostics for galaxies throughout the universe. Our goal is to explain the differences and trends observed in the FIR line emission of dwarf galaxies compared to more metal-rich galaxies. We present Herschel PACS spectroscopic observations of the CII157um, OI63 and 145um, OIII88um, NII122 and 205um, and NIII57um fine-structure cooling lines in a sample of 48 low-metallicity star-forming galaxies of the guaranteed time key program Dwarf Galaxy Survey. We correlate PACS line ratios and line-to-LTIR ratios with LTIR, LTIR/LB, metallicity, and FIR color, and interpret the observed trends in terms of ISM conditions and phase filling factors with Cloudy radiative transfer models. We find that the FIR lines together account for up to 3 percent of LTIR and that star-forming regions dominate the overall emission in dwarf galaxies. Compared to metal-rich galaxies, the ratios of OIII/NII122 and NIII/NII122 are high, indicative of hard radiation fields. In the photodissociation region (PDR), the CII/OI63 ratio is slightly higher than in metal-rich galaxies, with a small increase with metallicity, and the OI145/OI63 ratio is generally lower than 0.1, demonstrating that optical depth effects should be small on the scales probed. The OIII/OI63 ratio can be used as an indicator of the ionized gas/PDR filling factor, and is found ~4 times higher in the dwarfs than in metal-rich galaxies. The high CII/LTIR, OI/LTIR, and OIII/LTIR ratios, which decrease with increasing LTIR and LTIR/LB, are interpreted as a combination of moderate FUV fields and low PDR covering factor. Harboring compact phases of low filling factor and a large volume filling factor of diffuse gas, the ISM of low-metallicity dwarf galaxies has a more porous structure than that in metal-rich galaxies.
  • The manner in which gas accretes and orbits within circumnuclear rings has direct implications for the star formation process. In particular, gas may be compressed and shocked at the inflow points, resulting in bursts of star formation at these locations. Afterwards the gas and young stars move together through the ring. In addition, star formation may occur throughout the ring, if and when the gas reaches sufficient density to collapse under gravity. These two scenarios for star formation in rings are often referred to as the `pearls on a string' and `popcorn' paradigms. In this paper, we use new Herschel PACS observations, obtained as part of the KINGFISH Open Time Key Program, along with archival Spitzer and ground-based observations from the SINGS Legacy project, to investigate the heating and cooling of the interstellar medium in the nearby star-forming ring galaxy, NGC4736. By comparing spatially resolved estimates of the stellar FUV flux available for heating, with the gas and dust cooling derived from the FIR continuum and line emission, we show that while star formation is indeed dominant at the inflow points in NGC 4736, additional star formation is needed to balance the gas heating and cooling throughout the ring. This additional component most likely arises from the general increase in gas density in the ring over its lifetime. Our data provide strong evidence, therefore, for a combination of the two paradigms for star formation in the ring in NGC4736.
  • The rate at which interstellar gas is converted into stars, and its dependence on environment, is one of the pillars on which our understanding of the visible Universe is build. We present a comparison of the surface density of young stars (Sigma_*) and dust surface density (Sigma_d) across NGC346 (N66) in 115 independent pixels of 6x6 pc^2. We find a correlation between Sigma_* and Sigma_d with a considerable scatter. A power law fit to the data yields a steep relation with an exponent of 2.6+-0.2. We convert Sigma_d to gas surface density (Sigma_g) and Sigma_* to star formation rate (SFR) surface densities (Sigma_SFR), using simple assumptions for the gas-to-dust mass ratio and the duration of star formation. The derived total SFR (4+-1 10^-3 M_sun/yr) is consistent with SFR estimated from the Ha emission integrated over the Ha nebula. On small scales the Sigma_SFR derived using Ha systematically underestimates the count-based Sigma_SFR, by up to a factor of 10. This is due to ionizing photons escaping the area, where the stars are counted. We find that individual 36 pc^2 pixels fall systematically above integrated disc-galaxies in the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram by on average a factor of ~7. The NGC346 average SFR over a larger area (90 pc radius) lies closer to the relation but remains high by a factor of ~3. The fraction of the total mass (gas plus young stars) locked in young stars is systematically high (~10 per cent) within the central 15 pc and systematically lower outside (2 per cent), which we interpret as variations in star formation efficiency. The inner 15 pc is dominated by young stars belonging to a centrally condensed cluster, while the outer parts are dominated by a dispersed population. Therefore, the observed trend could reflect a change of star formation efficiency between clustered and non-clustered star-formation.
  • With the newly available SPIRE images at 250 and 500 micron from Herschel Space Observatory, we study quantitative correlations over a sub-kpc scale among three distinct emission components in the interstellar medium of the nearby spiral galaxy M 81 (NGC 3031): (a) $I_{8}$ or $I_{24}$, the surface brightness of the mid-infrared emission observed in the Spitzer IRAC 8 or MIPS 24 micron band, with $I_8$ and $I_{24}$ being dominated by the emissions from Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs) of dust, respectively; (b) $I_{500}$, that of the cold dust continuum emission in the Herschel SPIRE 500 micron band, dominated by the emission from large dust grains heated by evolved stars, and (c) $I_{{\rm H}\alpha}$, a nominal surface brightness of the H$\alpha$ line emission, from gas ionized by newly formed massive stars. The results from our correlation study, free from any assumption on or modeling of dust emissivity law or dust temperatures, present solid evidence for significant heating of PAHs and VSGs by evolved stars. In the case of M 81, about 67% (48%) of the 8 micron (24 micron) emission derives its heating from evolved stars, with the remainder attributed to radiation heating associated with ionizing stars.
  • The [CII] 157.74 $\mu$m transition is the dominant coolant of the neutral interstellar gas, and has great potential as a star formation rate (SFR) tracer. Using the Herschel KINGFISH sample of 46 nearby galaxies, we investigate the relation of [CII] surface brightness and luminosity with SFR. We conclude that [CII] can be used for measurements of SFR on both global and kiloparsec scales in normal star-forming galaxies in the absence of strong active galactic nuclei (AGN). The uncertainty of the $\Sigma_{\rm [CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ calibration is $\pm$0.21 dex. The main source of scatter in the correlation is associated with regions that exhibit warm IR colors, and we provide an adjustment based on IR color that reduces the scatter. We show that the color-adjusted $\Sigma_{\rm[CII]}-\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ correlation is valid over almost 5 orders of magnitude in $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$, holding for both normal star-forming galaxies and non-AGN luminous infrared galaxies. Using [CII] luminosity instead of surface brightness to estimate SFR suffers from worse systematics, frequently underpredicting SFR in luminous infrared galaxies even after IR color adjustment (although this depends on the SFR measure employed). We suspect that surface brightness relations are better behaved than the luminosity relations because the former are more closely related to the local far-UV field strength, most likely the main parameter controlling the efficiency of the conversion of far-UV radiation into gas heating. A simple model based on Starburst99 population-synthesis code to connect SFR to [CII] finds that heating efficiencies are $1\%-3\%$ in normal galaxies.
  • Physical conditions of the interstellar medium in galaxies are closely linked to the ambient radiation field and the heating of dust grains. In order to characterize dust properties in galaxies over a wide range of physical conditions, we present here the radial surface brightness profiles of the entire sample of 61 galaxies from Key Insights into Nearby Galaxies: Far-Infrared Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH). The main goal of our work is the characterization of the grain emissivities, dust temperatures, and interstellar radiation fields responsible for heating the dust. After fitting the dust and stellar radial profiles with exponential functions, we fit the far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) in each annular region with single-temperature modified black bodies using both variable (MBBV) and fixed (MBBF) emissivity indices beta, as well as with physically motivated dust models. Results show that while most SED parameters decrease with radius, the emissivity index beta also decreases with radius in some galaxies, but in others is increasing, or rising in the inner regions and falling in the outer ones. Despite the fixed grain emissivity (average beta~ 2.1) of the physically-motivated models, they are well able to accommodate flat spectral slopes with beta<= 1. We find that flatter slopes (beta<= 1.5) are associated with cooler temperatures, contrary to what would be expected from the usual Tdust-beta degeneracy. This trend is related to variations in Umin since beta and Umin are very closely linked over the entire range in Umin sampled by the KINGFISH galaxies: low Umin is associated with flat beta<=1. Both these results strongly suggest that the low apparent \beta values (flat slopes) in MBBV fits are caused by temperature mixing along the line-of-sight, rather than by intrinsic variations in grain properties. Abstract truncated for arXiv.
  • We search for variations in the disk of Centaurus A of the emission from atomic fine structure lines using Herschel PACS and SPIRE spectroscopy. In particular we observe the [C II](158 $\mu$m), [N II](122 and 205 $\mu$m), [O I](63 and 145 $\mu$m) and [O III](88 $\mu$m) lines, which all play an important role in cooling the gas in photo-ionized and photodissociation regions. We determine that the ([C II]+[O I]$_{63}$)/$F_{TIR}$ line ratio, a proxy for the heating efficiency of the gas, shows no significant radial trend across the observed region, in contrast to observations of other nearby galaxies. We determine that 10 - 20% of the observed [C II] emission originates in ionized gas. Comparison between our observations and a PDR model shows that the strength of the far-ultraviolet radiation field, $G_0$, varies between $10^{1.75}$ and $10^{2.75}$ and the hydrogen nucleus density varies between $10^{2.75}$ and $10^{3.75}$ cm$^{-3}$, with no significant radial trend in either property. In the context of the emission line properties of the grand-design spiral galaxy M51 and the elliptical galaxy NGC 4125, the gas in Cen A appears more characteristic of that in typical disk galaxies rather than elliptical galaxies.
  • We investigate the connection between dust and gas in the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891. High resolution Herschel PACS and SPIRE 70, 100, 160, 250, 350, and 500 $\mu$m images are combined with JCMT SCUBA 850 $\mu$m observations to trace the far-infrared/submillimetre spectral energy distribution (SED). Maps of the HI 21 cm line and CO(J=3-2) emission trace the atomic and molecular hydrogen gas, respectively. We fit one-component modified blackbody models to the integrated SED, finding a global dust mass of 8.5$\times$10$^{7}$ M$_{\odot}$ and an average temperature of 23$\pm$2 K. We also fit the pixel-by-pixel SEDs to produce maps of the dust mass and temperature. The dust mass distribution correlates with the total stellar population as traced by the 3.6 $\mu$m emission. The derived dust temperature, which ranges from approximately 17 to 24 K, is found to correlate with the 24 $\mu$m emission. Allowing the dust emissivity index to vary, we find an average value of $\beta$ = 1.9$\pm$0.3. We confirm an inverse relation between the dust emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, but do not observe any variation of this relationship with vertical height from the mid-plane of the disk. A comparison of the dust properties with the gaseous components of the ISM reveals strong spatial correlations between the surface mass densities of dust and the molecular hydrogen and total gas surface densities. Observed asymmetries in the dust temperature, and the H$_{2}$-to-dust and total gas-to-dust ratios hint that an enhancement in the star formation rate may be the result of larger quantities of molecular gas available to fuel star formation in the NE compared to the SW. Whilst the asymmetry likely arises from dust obscuration due to the geometry of the line-of-sight projection of the spiral arms, we cannot exclude an enhancement in the star formation rate in the NE side of the disk.
  • We gather infrared (IR) photometric data from 8 to 500 microns (Spitzer, WISE, IRAS and Herschel) for all of the HRS galaxies. Draine & Li (2007) models are fit to the data from which the stellar contribution has been carefully removed. We find that our photometric coverage is sufficient to constrain all of the models parameters and that a strong constraint on the 20-60 microns range is mandatory to estimate the relative contribution of the photo-dissociation regions to the IR SED. The SED models tend to systematically under-estimate the observed 500 microns flux densities, especially for low mass systems. We provide the output parameters for all of the galaxies: the minimum intensity of the interstellar radiation field (ISRF), the fraction of PAH, the relative contribution of PDR and evolved stellar population to the dust heating, the $M_{dust}$ and the $L_{IR}$. For a subsample of gas-rich galaxies, we analyze the relations between these parameters and the integrated properties of galaxies, such as $M_*$, SFR, metallicity, H$\alpha$ and H-band surface brightness, and the FUV attenuation. A good correlation between the fraction of PAH and the metallicity is found implying a weakening of the PAH emission in galaxies with low metallicities. The intensity of the IRSF and the H-band and H$\alpha$ surface brightnesses are correlated, suggesting that the diffuse dust component is heated by both the young stars in star forming regions and the diffuse evolved population. We use these results to provide a new set of IR templates calibrated with Herschel observations on nearby galaxies and a mean SED template to provide the z=0 reference for cosmological studies. For the same purpose, we put our sample on the SFR-$M_*$ diagram. The templates are compared to the most popular IR SED libraries, enlightening a large discrepancy between all of them in the 20-100 microns range.
  • We model the infrared to submillimeter spectral energy distribution of 11 nearby galaxies of the KINGFISH sample using Spitzer and Herschel data and compare model extrapolations at 870um (using different fitting techniques) with LABOCA 870um observations. We investigate how the differences between predictions and observations vary with model assumptions or environment. At global scales, we find that modified blackbody models using realistic cold emissivity indices (beta_c=2 or 1.5) are able to reproduce the 870um observed emission within the uncertainties for most of the sample. Low values (beta_c<1.3) would be required in NGC0337, NGC1512 and NGC7793. At local scales, we observe a systematic 870um excess when using beta_=2.0. The beta_c=1.5 or the Draine and Li (2007) models can reconcile predictions with observations in part of the disks. Some of the remaining excesses occur towards the centres and can be partly or fully accounted for by non-dust contributions such as CO(3-2) or, to a lesser extent, free-free or synchrotron emission. In three non-barred galaxies, the remaining excesses rather occur in the disk outskirts. This could be a sign of a flattening of the submm slope (and decrease of the effective emissivity index) with radius in these objects.
  • We aim to quantify the molecular gas reservoir in a subset of 6 low-metallicity galaxies from the Herschel Dwarf Galaxy Survey with newly acquired CO data, and link this reservoir to the observed star formation activity. We present CO(1-0), CO(2-1), and CO(3-2) observations obtained at the ATNF Mopra 22-m, APEX, and IRAM 30-m telescopes, as well as [CII] 157um and [OI] 63um observations obtained with the Herschel/PACS spectrometer in the 6 galaxies: Haro11, Mrk1089, Mrk930, NGC4861, NGC625, and UM311. We derive molecular gas mass from several methods including the use of the CO-to-H2 conversion factor Xco (both Galactic and metallicity-scaled values) and of dust measurements. The molecular and atomic gas reservoirs are compared to the star formation activity. We also constrain the physical conditions of the molecular clouds using the non-LTE code RADEX and the spectral synthesis code Cloudy. We detect CO in 5 of the 6 galaxies, including first detections in Haro11 (Z~0.4 Zsun), Mrk930 (0.2 Zsun), and UM311 (0.5 Zsun), but CO remains undetected in NGC4861 (0.2 Zsun). The CO luminosities are low while [CII] is bright in these galaxies, resulting in [CII]/CO(1-0)>10000. Our dwarf galaxies are in relatively good agreement with the Schmidt-Kennicutt relation for total gas. They show short molecular depletion time scales, even when considering metallicity-scaled Xco factors. Those galaxies are dominated by their HI gas, except Haro11 which has high star formation efficiency and is dominated by ionized and molecular gas. We determine the mass of each ISM phase in Haro11 using Cloudy and estimate an equivalent Xco factor which is 10 times higher than the Galactic value. Overall, our results confirm the emerging picture that CO suffers from significant selective photodissociation in low-metallicity dwarf galaxies.
  • This paper analyses the behaviour of the gas-to-dust mass ratio (G/D) of local Universe galaxies over a large metallicity range. We combine three samples: the Dwarf Galaxy Survey, the KINGFISH survey and a subsample from Galametz et al. (2011) totalling 126 galaxies, covering a 2 dex metallicity range, with 30% of the sample with 12+log(O/H) < 8.0. The dust masses are homogeneously determined with a semi-empirical dust model, including submm constraints. The atomic and molecular gas masses are compiled from the literature. Two XCO are used to estimate molecular gas masses: the Galactic XCO, and a XCO depending on the metallicity (as Z^{-2}). Correlations with morphological types, stellar masses, star formation rates and specific star formation rates are discussed. The trend between G/D and metallicity is empirically modelled using power-laws (slope of -1 and free) and a broken power-law. We compare the evolution of the G/D with predictions from chemical evolution models. We find that out of the five tested galactic parameters, metallicity is the galactic property driving the observed G/D. The G/D versus metallicity relation cannot be represented by a power-law with a slope of -1 over the whole metallicity range. The observed trend is steeper for metallicities lower than ~ 8.0. A large scatter is observed in the G/D for a given metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.37 dex in metallicity bins of ~0.1 dex. The broken power-law reproduces best the observed G/D and provides estimates of the G/D that are accurate to a factor of 1.6. The good agreement of the G/D and its scatter with the three tested chemical evolution models shows that the scatter is intrinsic to galactic properties, reflecting the different star formation histories, dust destruction efficiencies, dust grain size distributions and chemical compositions across the sample. (abriged)