• What are Type II-Linear supernovae (SNe II-L)? This class, which has been ill defined for decades, now receives significant attention -- both theoretically, in order to understand what happens to stars in the ~15-25Mo range, and observationally, with two independent studies suggesting that they cannot be cleanly separated photometrically from the regular hydrogen-rich SNe II-P characterised by a marked plateau in their light curve. Here, we analyze the multi-band light curves and extensive spectroscopic coverage of a sample of 35 SNe II and find that 11 of them could be SNe II-L. The spectra of these SNe are hydrogen deficient, typically have shallow Halpha absorption, may show indirect signs of helium via strong OI 7774 absorption, and have faster line velocities consistent with a thin hydrogen shell. The light curves can be mostly differentiated from those of the regular, hydrogen-rich SNe II-P by their steeper decline rates and higher luminosity, and we propose as a defining photometric characteristic the decline in the V band: SNe II-L seem to decline by more than 0.5 mag from peak brightness by day 50 after explosion. Using our sample we provide template light curves for SNe II-L and II-P in 4 photometric bands.
  • We present extensive multi-wavelength observations of the extremely rapidly declining Type Ic supernova, SN 2005ek. Reaching a peak magnitude of M_R = -17.3 and decaying by ~3 mag in the first 15 days post-maximum, SN 2005ek is among the fastest Type I supernovae observed to date. The spectra of SN 2005ek closely resemble those of normal SN Ic, but with an accelerated evolution. There is evidence for the onset of nebular features at only nine days post-maximum. Spectroscopic modeling reveals an ejecta mass of ~0.3 Msun that is dominated by oxygen (~80%), while the pseudo-bolometric light curve is consistent with an explosion powered by ~0.03 Msun of radioactive Ni-56. Although previous rapidly evolving events (e.g., SN 1885A, SN 1939B, SN 2002bj, SN 2010X) were hypothesized to be produced by the detonation of a helium shell on a white dwarf, oxygen-dominated ejecta are difficult to reconcile with this proposed mechanism. We find that the properties of SN 2005ek are consistent with either the edge-lit double detonation of a low-mass white dwarf or the iron-core collapse of a massive star, stripped by binary interaction. However, if we assume that the strong spectroscopic similarity of SN 2005ek to other SN Ic is an indication of a similar progenitor channel, then a white-dwarf progenitor becomes very improbable. SN 2005ek may be one of the lowest mass stripped-envelope core-collapse explosions ever observed. We find that the rate of such rapidly declining Type I events is at least 1-3% of the normal SN Ia rate.
  • We describe observed properties of the Type Iax class of supernovae (SNe Iax), consisting of SNe observationally similar to its prototypical member, SN 2002cx. The class currently has 25 members, and we present optical photometry and/or optical spectroscopy for most of them. SNe Iax are spectroscopically similar to SNe Ia, but have lower maximum-light velocities (2000 < |v| < 8000 km/s), typically lower peak magnitudes (-14.2 > M_V,peak > -18.9 mag), and most have hot photospheres. Relative to SNe Ia, SNe Iax have low luminosities for their light-curve shape. There is a correlation between luminosity and light-curve shape, similar to that of SNe Ia, but offset from that of SNe Ia and with larger scatter. Despite a host-galaxy morphology distribution that is highly skewed to late-type galaxies without any SNe Iax discovered in elliptical galaxies, there are several indications that the progenitor stars are white dwarfs (WDs): evidence of C/O burning in their maximum-light spectra, low ejecta masses, strong Fe lines in their late-time spectra, a lack of X-ray detections, and deep limits on massive stars and star formation at the SN sites. However, two SNe Iax show strong He lines in their spectra. The progenitor system and explosion model that best fits all of the data is a binary system of a C/O WD that accretes matter from a He star and has a significant deflagration. At least some of the time, this explosion will not disrupt the WD. We estimate that in a given volume there are 31^+17_-13 SNe Iax for every 100 SNe Ia, and for every 1 M_sun of iron generated by SNe Ia at z = 0, SNe Iax generate 0.052^+0.017_-0.014 M_sun. Being the largest class of peculiar SNe, thousands of SNe Iax will be discovered by LSST. Future detailed observations of SNe Iax should further our understanding of both their progenitor systems and explosions as well as those of SNe Ia.
  • Supernova (SN) 2009ig was discovered 17 hours after explosion by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, promptly classified as a normal Type Ia SN (SN Ia), peaked at V = 13.5 mag, and was equatorial, making it one of the foremost supernovae for intensive study in the last decade. Here, we present ultraviolet (UV) and optical observations of SN 2009ig, starting about 1 day after explosion until around maximum brightness. Our data include excellent UV and optical light curves, 25 premaximum optical spectra, and 8 UV spectra, including the earliest UV spectrum ever obtained of a SN Ia. SN 2009ig is a relatively normal SN Ia, but does display high-velocity ejecta - the ejecta velocity measured in our earliest spectra (v ~ -23,000 km/s for Si II 6355) is the highest yet measured in a SN Ia. The spectral evolution is very dramatic at times earlier than 12 days before maximum brightness, but slows after that time. The early-time data provide a precise measurement of 17.13 +/- 0.07 days for the SN rise time. The optical color curves and early-time spectra are significantly different from template light curves and spectra used for light-curve fitting and K-corrections, indicating that the template light curves and spectra do not properly represent all Type Ia supernovae at very early times. In the age of wide-angle sky surveys, SNe like SN 2009ig that are nearby, bright, well positioned, and promptly discovered will still be rare. As shown with SN 2009ig, detailed studies of single events can provide significantly more information for testing systematic uncertainties related to SN Ia distance estimates and constraining progenitor and explosion models than large samples of more distant SNe.
  • The Seyfert 1 galaxy Zw 229-015 is among the brightest active galaxies being monitored by the Kepler mission. In order to determine the black hole mass in Zw 229-015 from H-beta reverberation mapping, we have carried out nightly observations with the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3m telescope during the dark runs from June through December 2010, obtaining 54 spectroscopic observations in total. We have also obtained nightly V-band imaging with the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope at Lick Observatory and with the 0.9m telescope at the Brigham Young University West Mountain Observatory over the same period. We detect strong variability in the source, which exhibited more than a factor of 2 change in broad H-beta flux. From cross-correlation measurements, we find that the H-beta light curve has a rest-frame lag of 3.86(+0.69,-0.90) days with respect to the V-band continuum variations. We also measure reverberation lags for H-alpha and H-gamma and find an upper limit to the H-delta lag. Combining the H-beta lag measurement with a broad H-beta width of sigma = 1590+/-47 km/s measured from the root-mean-square variability spectrum, we obtain a virial estimate of M_BH = 1.00(-0.24,+0.19)*10^7 solar masses for the black hole in Zw 229-015. As a Kepler target, Zw 229-015 will eventually have one of the highest-quality optical light curves ever measured for any active galaxy, and the black hole mass determined from reverberation mapping will serve as a benchmark for testing relationships between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
  • Supernovae (SNe) are thought to arise from two different physical processes. The cores of massive, short-lived stars undergo gravitational core collapse and typically eject a few solar masses during their explosion. These are thought to appear as as type Ib/c and II SNe, and are associated with young stellar populations. A type Ia SN is thought to arise from the thermonuclear detonation of a white dwarf star composed mainly of carbon and oxygen, whose mass approaches the Chandrasekhar limit. Such SNe are observed in both young and old stellar environments. Here we report our discovery of the faint type Ib SN 2005E in the halo of the nearby isolated galaxy, NGC 1032. The lack of any trace of recent star formation near the SN location (Fig. 1), and the very low derived ejected mass (~0.3 M_sun), argue strongly against a core-collapse origin for this event. Spectroscopic observations and the derived nucleosynthetic output show that the SN ejecta have high velocities and are dominated by helium-burning products, indicating that SN 2005E was neither a subluminous nor a regular SN Ia (Fig. 2). We have therefore found a new type of stellar explosion, arising from a low-mass, old stellar system, likely involving a binary with a primary white dwarf and a helium-rich secondary. The SN ejecta contain more calcium than observed in any known type of SN and likely additional large amounts of radioactive 44Ti. Such SNe may thus help resolve fundamental physical puzzles, extending from the composition of the primitive solar system and that of the oldest stars, to the Galactic production of positrons.
  • An extensive dataset for SN 2003hv that covers the flux evolution from maximum light to day +786 is presented. The data are combined with published nebular-phase infrared spectra, and the observations are compared to model light curves and synthetic nebular spectra. SN 2003hv is a normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with photometric and spectroscopic properties consistent with its rarely observed B-band decline-rate parameter, Delta m_15 = 1.61 +- 0.02. The blueshift of the most isolated [Fe II] lines in the nebular-phase optical spectrum appears consistent with those observed in the infrared at similar epochs. At late times there is a prevalent color evolution from the optical toward the near-infrared bands. We present the latest-ever detection of a SN Ia in the near-infrared in Hubble Space Telescope images. The study of the ultraviolet/optical/infrared (UVOIR) light curve reveals that a substantial fraction of the flux is "missing" at late times. Between 300-700 days past maximum brightness, the UVOIR light curve declines linearly following the decay of radioactive Co56, assuming full and instantaneous positron trapping. At 700 days we detect a possible slowdown of the decline in optical bands, mainly in the V band. The data are incompatible with a dramatic infrared catastrophe. However, the idea that an infrared catastrophe occurred in the densest regions before 350 days can explain the missing flux from the UVOIR wavelengths and the flat-topped profiles in the near-infrared. We argue that such a scenario is possible if the ejecta are clumpy. The observations suggest that positrons are most likely trapped in the ejecta.
  • We present optical photometry and spectra for the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2007gi in the nearby galaxy NGC 4036. SN 2007gi is characterized by extremely high-velocity (HV) features of the intermediate-mass elements (Si, Ca, and S), with expansion velocities ($v_{\rm exp}$) approaching $\sim$15,500 km s$^{-1}$ near maximum brightness (compared to $\sim$10,600 km s$^{-1}$ for SNe Ia with normal $v_{\rm exp}$). SN 2007gi reached a $B$-band peak magnitude of 13.25$\pm$0.04 mag with a decline rate of $\Delta m_{15}(B)$(true) = 1.33$\pm$0.09 mag. The $B$-band light curve of SN 2007gi demonstrated an interesting two-stage evolution during the nebular phase, with a decay rate of 1.16$\pm$0.05 mag (100 days)$^{-1}$ during $t = 60$--90 days and 1.61$\pm0.04$ mag (100 days)$^{-1}$ thereafter. Such a behavior was also observed in the HV SN Ia 2006X, and might be caused by the interaction between supernova ejecta and circumstellar material (CSM) around HV SNe Ia. Based on a sample of a dozen well-observed $R$-band (or unfiltered) light curves of SNe Ia, we confirm that the HV events may have a faster rise time to maximum than the ones with normal $v_{\rm exp}$.
  • We present extensive early photometric (ultraviolet through near-infrared) and spectroscopic (optical and near-infrared) data on supernova (SN) 2008D as well as X-ray data analysis on the associated Swift/X-ray transient (XRT) 080109. Our data span a time range of 5 hours before the detection of the X-ray transient to 150 days after its detection, and detailed analysis allowed us to derive constraints on the nature of the SN and its progenitor; throughout we draw comparisons with results presented in the literature and find several key aspects that differ. We show that the X-ray spectrum of XRT 080109 can be fit equally well by an absorbed power law or a superposition of about equal parts of both power law and blackbody. Our data first established that SN 2008D is a spectroscopically normal SN Ib (i.e., showing conspicuous He lines), and show that SN 2008D had a relatively long rise time of 18 days and a modest optical peak luminosity. The early-time light curves of the SN are dominated by a cooling stellar envelope (for \Delta t~0.1- 4 day, most pronounced in the blue bands) followed by 56^Ni decay. We construct a reliable measurement of the bolometric output for this stripped-envelope SN, and, combined with estimates of E_K and M_ej from the literature, estimate the stellar radius R_star of its probable Wolf-Rayet progenitor. According to the model of Waxman et al. and of Chevalier & Fransson, we derive R_star^{W07}= 1.2+/-0.7 R_sun and R_star^{CF08}= 12+/-7 R_sun, respectively; the latter being more in line with typical WN stars. Spectra obtained at 3 and 4 months after maximum light show double-peaked oxygen lines that we associate with departures from spherical symmetry, as has been suggested for the inner ejecta of a number of SN Ib cores.
  • We report on our early photometric and spectroscopic observations of the extremely luminous Type II supernova (SN) 2008es. With an observed peak optical magnitude of m_V = 17.8 and at a redshift z = 0.213, SN 2008es had a peak absolute magnitude of M_V = -22.3, making it the second most luminous SN ever observed. The photometric evolution of SN 2008es exhibits a fast decline rate (~0.042 mag d^-1), similar to the extremely luminous Type II-L SN 2005ap. We show that SN 2008es spectroscopically resembles the luminous Type II-L SN 1979C. Although the spectra of SN 2008es lack the narrow and intermediate-width line emission typically associated with the interaction of a SN with the circumstellar medium of its progenitor star, we argue that the extreme luminosity of SN 2008es is powered via strong interaction with a dense, optically thick circumstellar medium. The integrated bolometric luminosity of SN 2008es yields a total radiated energy at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths of >10^51 ergs. Finally, we examine the apparently anomalous rate at which the Texas Supernova Search has discovered rare kinds of supernovae, including the five most luminous supernovae observed to date, and find that their results are consistent with those of other modern SN searches.
  • We have obtained optical spectra of 29 early-type (E/S0) galaxies that hosted type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We have measured absorption-line strengths and compared them to a grid of models to extract the relations between the supernova properties and the luminosity-weighted age/composition of the host galaxies. The same analysis was applied to a large number of early-type field galaxies selected from the SDSS spectroscopic survey. We find no difference in the age and abundance distributions between the field galaxies and the SN Ia host galaxies. We do find a strong correlation suggesting that SNe Ia in galaxies whose populations have a characteristic age greater than 5 Gyr are ~ 1 mag fainter at V(max) than those found in galaxies with younger populations. However, the data cannot discriminate between a smooth relation connecting age and supernova luminosity or two populations of SN Ia progenitors. We find that SN Ia distance residuals in the Hubble diagram are correlated with host-galaxy metal abundance, consistent with the predictions of Timmes, Brown & Truran (2003). The data show that high iron abundance galaxies host less-luminous supernovae. We thus conclude that the time since progenitor formation primarily determines the radioactive Ni production while progenitor metal abundance has a weaker influence on peak luminosity, but one not fully corrected by light-curve shape and color fitters. Assuming no selection effects in discovering SNe Ia in local early-type galaxies, we find a higher specific SN Ia rate in E/S0 galaxies with ages below 3 Gyr than in older hosts. The higher rate and brighter luminosities seen in the youngest E/S0 hosts may be a result of recent star formation and represents a tail of the "prompt" SN Ia progenitors.
  • We present extensive u'g'r'i'BVRIYJHKs photometry and optical spectroscopy of SN 2005hk. These data reveal that SN 2005hk was nearly identical in its observed properties to SN 2002cx, which has been called ``the most peculiar known type Ia supernova.'' Both supernovae exhibited high ionization SN 1991T-like pre-maximum spectra, yet low peak luminosities like SN 1991bg. The spectra reveal that SN 2005hk, like SN 2002cx, exhibited expansion velocities that were roughly half those of typical type Ia supernovae. The R and I light curves of both supernovae were also peculiar in not displaying the secondary maximum observed for normal type Ia supernovae. Our YJH photometry of SN 2005hk reveals the same peculiarity in the near-infrared. By combining our optical and near-infrared photometry of SN 2005hk with published ultraviolet light curves obtained with the Swift satellite, we are able to construct a bolometric light curve from ~10 days before to ~60 days after B maximum. The shape and unusually low peak luminosity of this light curve, plus the low expansion velocities and absence of a secondary maximum at red and near-infrared wavelengths, are all in reasonable agreement with model calculations of a 3D deflagration which produces ~0.25 M_sun of 56Ni.
  • We present optical and infrared observations of the unusual Type Ia supernova (SN) 2004eo. The light curves and spectra closely resemble those of the prototypical SN 1992A, and the luminosity at maximum (M_B = -19.08) is close to the average for a SN Ia. However, the ejected 56Ni mass derived by modelling the bolometric light curve (about 0.45 solar masses) lies near the lower limit of the 56Ni mass distribution observed in normal SNe Ia. Accordingly, SN 2004eo shows a relatively rapid post-maximum decline in the light curve (Delta m_(B) = 1.46), small expansion velocities in the ejecta, and a depth ratio Si II 5972 / Si II 6355 similar to that of SN 1992A. The physical properties of SN 2004eo cause it to fall very close to the boundary between the faint, low velocity gradient, and high velocity gradient subgroups proposed by Benetti et al. (2005). Similar behaviour is seen in a few other SNe Ia. Thus, there may in fact exist a few SNe Ia with intermediate physical properties.