• We present Magellan/M2FS, VLT/GIRAFFE, and Gemini South/GMOS spectroscopy of the newly discovered Milky Way satellite Reticulum II. Based on the spectra of 25 Ret II member stars selected from Dark Energy Survey imaging, we measure a mean heliocentric velocity of 62.8 +/- 0.5 km/s and a velocity dispersion of 3.3 +/- 0.7 km/s. The mass-to-light ratio of Ret II within its half-light radius is 470 +/- 210 Msun/Lsun, demonstrating that it is a strongly dark matter-dominated system. Despite its spatial proximity to the Magellanic Clouds, the radial velocity of Ret II differs from that of the LMC and SMC by 199 and 83 km/s, respectively, suggesting that it is not gravitationally bound to the Magellanic system. The likely member stars of Ret II span 1.3 dex in metallicity, with a dispersion of 0.28 +/- 0.09 dex, and we identify several extremely metal-poor stars with [Fe/H] < -3. In combination with its luminosity, size, and ellipticity, these results confirm that Ret II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy. With a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.65 +/- 0.07, Ret II matches Segue~1 as the most metal-poor galaxy known. Although Ret II is the third-closest dwarf galaxy to the Milky Way, the line-of-sight integral of the dark matter density squared is log J = 18.8 +/- 0.6 Gev^2/cm^5 within 0.2 degrees, indicating that the predicted gamma-ray flux from dark matter annihilation in Ret II is lower than that of several other dwarf galaxies.
  • We present the deepest optical photometry for any dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy based on Hubble Space Telescope ACS observations of the Local Group dE galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. The resulting F606W and F814W color-magnitude diagrams are the first to reach below the main sequence turnoff in a dE galaxy, allowing us to determine full star formation histories in these systems. The ACS fields are located ~1.5 effective radii from the galaxy center to avoid photometric crowding. While our ACS pointings in both dEs show unambiguous evidence for old and intermediate age stars, the mean age in NGC 147 is ~ 4 Gyr younger as compared to NGC 185. In NGC 147, only 40% of stars were in place 12.5 Gyrs ago (z~5), with the bulk of the remaining stellar population forming between 5 to 7 Gyr. In contrast, 70% of stars were formed in NGC 185 field more than12.5 Gyr ago with the majority of the remaining population forming between 8 to 10 Gyr. Star formation ceased in both ACS fields at least 3 Gyr ago. Previous observations in the central regions of NGC 185 show evidence for star formation as recent as 100 Myr ago and a strong metallicity gradient with radius. We suggest that the orbit of NGC 185 has a larger pericenter as compared to NGC 147, allowing it to preserve radial gradients and maintain a small central reservoir of recycled gas. We interpret the inferred differences in star formation histories to imply an earlier infall time into the M31 environment for NGC 185 as compared to NGC 147.
  • We present global metallicity properties, metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) and radial metallicity profiles for the six most luminous M31 dwarf galaxy satellites: M32, NGC 205, NGC 185, NGC 147, Andromeda VII, and Andromeda II. The results presented are the first spectroscopic MDFs for dwarf systems surrounding a host galaxy other than the Milky Way. Our sample consists of individual metallicity measurements for 1243 red giant branch (RGB) member stars spread across these six systems. We determine metallicities based on the strength of the Ca II triplet lines using the empirical calibration of Carrera et al.(2013) which is calibrated over the metallicity range -4 < [Fe/H] <+0.5. We find that these M31 satellites lie on the same luminosity-metallicity relationship as the Milky Way dwarf satellites. We do not find a trend between the internal metallicity spread and galaxy luminosity, contrary to previous studies. The MDF widths of And II and And VII are similar to the MW dwarfs of comparable luminosity, however, our four brightest M31 dwarf are more luminous than any of the MW dwarf spheroidals and have broader MDFs. The MDFs of our six M31 dwarfs are consistent with the leaky box model of chemical evolution, although our metallicity errors allow a wide range of evolution models. We find a significant radial gradient in metallicity in only two of our six systems, NGC 185 and Andromeda II, and flat radial metallicity gradients in the rest of our sample with no observed correlation between rotational support and radial metallicity gradients. While the average properties and radial trends of the M31 dwarf galaxies agree with MW counterparts at similar luminosity, the detailed MDFs are different, particularly at the metal-rich end.
  • We present Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopy and CFHT/MegaCam photometry for the Milky Way globular cluster Palomar 13. We triple the number of spectroscopically confirmed members, including many repeat velocity measurements. Palomar 13 is the only known globular cluster with possible evidence for dark matter, based on a Keck/HIRES 21 star velocity dispersion of sigma=2.2+/-0.4 km/s. We reproduce this measurement, but demonstrate that it is inflated by unresolved binary stars. For our sample of 61 stars, the velocity dispersion is sigma=0.7(+0.6/-0.5) km/s. Combining our DEIMOS data with literature values, our final velocity dispersion is sigma=0.4(+0.4/-0.3) km/s. We determine a spectroscopic metallicity of [Fe/H]=-1.6+/-0.1 dex, placing a 1-sigma upper limit of sigma_[Fe/H]~0.2 dex on any internal metallicity spread. We determine Palomar 13's total luminosity to be M_V=-2.8+/-0.4, making it among the least luminous known globular clusters. The photometric isophotes are regular out to the half-light radius and mildly irregular outside this radius. The outer surface brightness profile slope is shallower than typical globular clusters (eta=-2.8+/-0.3). Thus at large radius, tidal debris is likely affecting the appearance of Palomar 13. Combining our luminosity with the intrinsic velocity dispersion, we find a dynamical mass of of M_1/2=1.3(+2.7/-1.3)x10^3 M_sun and a mass-to-light ratio of M/L_V=2.4(+5.0/-2.4) M_sun/L_sun. Within our measurement errors, the mass-to-light ratio agrees with the theoretical predictions for a single stellar population. We conclude that, while there is some evidence for tidal stripping at large radius, the dynamical mass of Palomar 13 is consistent with its stellar mass and neither significant dark matter, nor extreme tidal heating, is required to explain the cluster dynamics.
  • We present constraints on the stellar initial mass function (IMF) in two ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxies, Hercules and Leo IV, based on deep HST/ACS imaging. The Hercules and Leo IV galaxies are extremely low luminosity (M_V = -6.2, -5.5), metal-poor (<[Fe/H]>= -2.4, -2.5) systems that have old stellar populations (> 11 Gyr). Because they have long relaxation times, we can directly measure the low-mass stellar IMF by counting stars below the main-sequence turnoff without correcting for dynamical evolution. Over the stellar mass range probed by our data, 0.52 - 0.77 Msun, the IMF is best fit by a power-law slope of alpha = 1.2^{+0.4}_{-0.5} for Hercules and alpha = 1.3 +/- 0.8 for Leo IV. For Hercules, the IMF slope is more shallow than a Salpeter IMF (alpha=2.35) at the 5.8-sigma level, and a Kroupa IMF (alpha=2.3 above 0.5 Msun) at 5.4-sigma level. We simultaneously fit for the binary fraction, finding f_binary = 0.47^{+0.16}_{-0.14} for Hercules, and 0.47^{+0.37}_{-0.17} for Leo IV. The UFD binary fractions are consistent with that inferred for Milky Way stars in the same mass range, despite very different metallicities. In contrast, the IMF slopes in the UFDs are shallower than other galactic environments. In the mass range 0.5 - 0.8 Msun, we see a trend across the handful of galaxies with directly measured IMFs such that the power-law slopes become shallower (more bottom-light) with decreasing galactic velocity dispersion and metallicity. This trend is qualitatively consistent with results in elliptical galaxies inferred via indirect methods and is direct evidence for IMF variations with galactic environment.
  • We present deep CMDs for two Subaru Suprime-Cam fields in the Virgo Stellar Stream(VSS)/Virgo Overdensity(VOD) and compare them to a field centred on the highest concentration of Sagittarius (Sgr) Tidal Stream stars in the leading arm, Branch A of the bifurcation. A prominent population of MS stars is detected in all three fields and can be traced as faint as g~24 mag. Using theoretical isochrone fitting we derive an age of 9.1(+1.0;-1.1)Gyr, a median abundance of [Fe/H]=-0.70 (+0.15; -0.20)dex and d_helio of 30.9+-3.0kpc for the MS of the Sgr Stream Branch A. The dominant main sequence populations in the two VSS/VOD fields (Lsun ~265 deg, Bsun ~13 deg) are located at a mean distance of 23.3+-1.6kpc and have an age ~8.2Gyr and an abundance [Fe/H]=-0.67(+0.16;-0.12)dex similar to the Sgr Stream stars. These parameters are also in good agreement with the age of the main population in the Sagittarius dwarf (8.0+-1.5Gyr). They also agree with the peak in the metallicity distribution of 2-3Gyr old M-giants, [Fe/H] ~ -0.6dex, in the Sgr leading arm north. We then compare the results from the VSS/VOD fields with the Sgr Tidal Stream model by Law & Majewski based on a triaxial Galactic halo that is calibrated with SDSS Sgr A-branch and 2MASS M-giant stars. We find that the most prominent feature in the CMDs, the MS population at 23kpc, is not explained by the model. Instead the model predicts in these directions a low density filamentary structure of Sgr debris stars at ~9kpc and a slightly higher concentration of Sgr stars spread from 42-53kpc. At best there is only marginal evidence for the presence of these populations in our data. Our findings then suggest that while there are probably some Sgr debris stars present, the dominant stellar population in the VOD originates from a different halo structure that has almost identical age and metallicity as some sections of the Sgr tidal stream.
  • We demonstrate that dwarf galaxies (10^7 < M_stellar < 10^9 Msun) with no active star formation are extremely rare (<0.06%) in the field. Our sample is based on the NASA-Sloan Atlas which is a re-analysis of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. We examine the relative number of quenched versus star forming dwarf galaxies, defining quenched galaxies as having no Halpha emission (EW_Halpha < 2 AA) and a strong 4000AA-break. The fraction of quenched dwarf galaxies decreases rapidly with increasing distance from a massive host, leveling off for distances beyond 1.5 Mpc. We define galaxies beyond 1.5 Mpc of a massive host galaxy to be in the field. We demonstrate that there is a stellar mass threshold of M_stellar < 1.0x10^9 Msun below which quenched galaxies do not exist in the field. Below this threshold, we find that none of the 2951 field dwarf galaxies are quenched; all field dwarf galaxies show evidence for recent star formation. Correcting for volume effects, this corresponds to a 1-sigma upper limit on the quenched fraction of 0.06%. In more dense environments, quenched galaxies account for 23% of the dwarf population over the same stellar mass range. The majority of quenched dwarf galaxies (often classified as dwarf elliptical galaxies) are within 2 virial radii of a massive galaxy, and only a few percent of quenched dwarf galaxies exist beyond 4 virial radii. Thus, for galaxies with stellar mass less than 1.0x10^9 Msun, ending star-formation requires the presence of a more massive neighbor, providing a stringent constraint on models of star formation feedback.
  • D. Schlegel, F. Abdalla, T. Abraham, C. Ahn, C. Allende Prieto, J. Annis, E. Aubourg, M. Azzaro, S. Bailey. C. Baltay, C. Baugh, C. Bebek, S. Becerril, M. Blanton, A. Bolton, B. Bromley, R. Cahn, P.-H. Carton, J. L. Cervantes-Cota, Y. Chu, M. Cortes, K. Dawson, A. Dey, M. Dickinson, H. T. Diehl, P. Doel, A. Ealet, J. Edelstein, D. Eppelle, S. Escoffier, A. Evrard, L. Faccioli, C. Frenk, M. Geha, D. Gerdes, P. Gondolo, A. Gonzalez-Arroyo, B. Grossan, T. Heckman, H. Heetderks, S. Ho, K. Honscheid, D. Huterer, O. Ilbert, I. Ivans, P. Jelinsky, Y. Jing, D. Joyce, R. Kennedy, S. Kent, D. Kieda, A. Kim, C. Kim, J.-P. Kneib, X. Kong, A. Kosowsky, K. Krishnan, O. Lahav, M. Lampton, S. LeBohec, V. Le Brun, M. Levi, C. Li, M. Liang, H. Lim, W. Lin, E. Linder, W. Lorenzon, A. de la Macorra, Ch. Magneville, R. Malina, C. Marinoni, V. Martinez, S. Majewski, T. Matheson, R. McCloskey, P. McDonald, T. McKay, J. McMahon, B. Menard, J. Miralda-Escude, M. Modjaz, A. Montero-Dorta, I. Morales, N. Mostek, J. Newman, R. Nichol, P. Nugent, K. Olsen, N. Padmanabhan, N. Palanque-Delabrouille, I. Park, J. Peacock, W. Percival, S. Perlmutter, C. Peroux, P. Petitjean, F. Prada, E. Prieto, J. Prochaska, K. Reil, C. Rockosi, N. Roe, E. Rollinde, A. Roodman, N. Ross, G. Rudnick, V. Ruhlmann-Kleider, J. Sanchez, D. Sawyer, C. Schimd, M. Schubnell, R. Scoccimaro, U. Seljak, H. Seo, E. Sheldon, M. Sholl, R. Shulte-Ladbeck, A. Slosar, D. S. Smith, G. Smoot, W. Springer, A. Stril, A. S. Szalay, C. Tao, G. Tarle, E. Taylor, A. Tilquin, J. Tinker, F. Valdes, J. Wang, T. Wang, B. A. Weaver, D. Weinberg, M. White, M. Wood-Vasey, J. Yang, X. Yang. Ch. Yeche, N. Zakamska, A. Zentner, C. Zhai, P. Zhang
    June 9, 2011 astro-ph.IM
    BigBOSS is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey over 14,000 square degrees. It has been conditionally accepted by NOAO in response to a call for major new instrumentation and a high-impact science program for the 4-m Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak. The BigBOSS instrument is a robotically-actuated, fiber-fed spectrograph capable of taking 5000 simultaneous spectra over a wavelength range from 340 nm to 1060 nm, with a resolution R = 3000-4800. Using data from imaging surveys that are already underway, spectroscopic targets are selected that trace the underlying dark matter distribution. In particular, targets include luminous red galaxies (LRGs) up to z = 1.0, extending the BOSS LRG survey in both redshift and survey area. To probe the universe out to even higher redshift, BigBOSS will target bright [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) up to z = 1.7. In total, 20 million galaxy redshifts are obtained to measure the BAO feature, trace the matter power spectrum at smaller scales, and detect redshift space distortions. BigBOSS will provide additional constraints on early dark energy and on the curvature of the universe by measuring the Ly-alpha forest in the spectra of over 600,000 2.2 < z < 3.5 quasars. BigBOSS galaxy BAO measurements combined with an analysis of the broadband power, including the Ly-alpha forest in BigBOSS quasar spectra, achieves a FOM of 395 with Planck plus Stage III priors. This FOM is based on conservative assumptions for the analysis of broad band power (kmax = 0.15), and could grow to over 600 if current work allows us to push the analysis to higher wave numbers (kmax = 0.3). BigBOSS will also place constraints on theories of modified gravity and inflation, and will measure the sum of neutrino masses to 0.024 eV accuracy.
  • We present kinematic and metallicity profiles for the M31 dwarf elliptical (dE) satellite galaxies NGC 147 and NGC 185. The profiles represent the most extensive spectroscopic radial coverage for any dE galaxy, extending to a projected distance of eight half-light radii (8 r_eff = 14'). We achieve this coverage via Keck/DEIMOS multislit spectroscopic observations of 520 and 442 member red giant branch stars in NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. In contrast to previous studies, we find that both dEs have significant internal rotation. We measure a maximum rotational velocity of 17+/-2 km/s for NGC 147 and 15+/-5 km/s for NGC 185. The velocity dispersions decrease gently with radius with an average dispersion of 16+/-1 km/s for NGC 147 and 24+/-1 km/s for NGC 185. Both dEs have internal metallicity dispersions of 0.5 dex, but show no evidence for a radial metallicity gradient. We construct two-integral axisymmetric dynamical models and find that the observed kinematical profiles cannot be explained without modest amounts of non-baryonic dark matter. We measure central mass-to-light ratios of ML_V = 4.2+/-0.6 and ML_V = 4.6+/-0.6 for NGC 147 and NGC 185, respectively. Both dE galaxies are consistent with being primarily flattened by their rotational motions, although some anisotropic velocity dispersion is needed to fully explain their observed shapes. The velocity profiles of all three Local Group dEs (NGC 147, NGC 185 and NGC 205) suggest that rotation is more prevalent in the dE galaxy class than previously assumed, but is often manifest only at several times the effective radius. Since all dEs outside the Local Group have been probed to only inside the effective radius, this opens the door for formation mechanisms in which dEs are transformed or stripped versions of gas-rich rotating progenitor galaxies.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2 photometry of 13 microlensed source stars from the 5.7 year Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) survey conducted by the MACHO Project. The microlensing source stars are identified by deriving accurate centroids in the ground-based MACHO images using difference image analysis (DIA) and then transforming the DIA coordinates to the HST frame. None of these sources is coincident with a background galaxy, which rules out the possibility that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample is contaminated with misidentified supernovae or AGN in galaxies behind the LMC. This supports the conclusion that the MACHO LMC microlensing sample has only a small amount of contamination due to non-microlensing forms of variability. We compare the WFPC2 source star magnitudes with the lensed flux predictions derived from microlensing fits to the light curve data. In most cases the source star brightness is accurately predicted. Finally, we develop a statistic which constrains the location of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing source stars with respect to the distributions of stars and dust in the LMC and compare this to the predictions of various models of LMC microlensing. This test excludes at > 90% confidence level models where more than 80% of the source stars lie behind the LMC. Exotic models that attempt to explain the excess LMC microlensing optical depth seen by MACHO with a population of background sources are disfavored or excluded by this test. Models in which most of the lenses reside in a halo or spheroid distribution associated with either the Milky Way or the LMC are consistent which these data, but LMC halo or spheroid models are favored by the combined MACHO and EROS microlensing results.
  • NGC 205, a close satellite of the M31 galaxy, is our nearest example of a dwarf elliptical galaxy. Photometric and kinematic observations suggest that NGC 205 is undergoing tidal distortion from its interaction with M31. Despite earlier attempts, the orbit and progenitor properties of NGC 205 are not well known. We perform an optimized search for these unknowns by combining a genetic algorithm with restricted N-body simulations of the interaction. This approach, coupled with photometric and kinematic observations as constraints, allows for an effective exploration of the parameter space. We represent NGC 205 as a static Hernquist potential with embedded massless test particles that serve as tracers of surface brightness. We explore 3 distinct, initially stable configurations of test particles: cold rotating disk, warm rotating disk, and hot, pressure-supported spheroid. Each model reproduces some, but not all, of the observed features of NGC 205, leading us to speculate that a rotating progenitor with substantial pressure support could match all of the observables. Furthermore, plausible combinations of mass and scale length for the pressure-supported spheroid progenitor model reproduce the observed velocity dispersion profile. For all 3 models, orbits that best match the observables place the satellite 11+/-9 kpc behind M31 moving at very large velocities: 300-500 km/s on primarily radial orbits. Given that the observed radial component is only 54 km/s, this implies a large tangential motion for NGC 205, moving from the NW to the SE. These results suggest NGC 205 is not associated with the stellar arc observed to the NE of NGC 205. Furthermore, NGC 205's velocity appears to be near or greater than its escape velocity, signifying that the satellite is likely on its first M31 passage.
  • We investigate the gas content and baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship for extremely low luminosity dwarf galaxies in the absolute magnitude range -13.5 > Mr > -16. The sample is selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and consists of 101 galaxies for which we have obtained follow-up HI observations using the Arecibo Observatory and Green Bank Telescope. This represents the largest homogeneous sample of dwarfs at low luminosities with well-measured HI and optical properties. The sample spans a range of environments, from dense groups to truly isolated galaxies. The average neutral gas fraction is f_gas=0.6, significantly exceeding that of typical gas-rich galaxies at higher luminosities. Dwarf galaxies are therefore less efficient at turning gas into stars over their lifetimes. The strong environmental dependence of the gas fraction distribution demonstrates that while internal processes can reduce the gas fractions to roughly f_gas=0.4, external processes are required to fully remove gas from a dwarf galaxy. The average rotational velocity of our sample is vrot=50 km/s. Including more massive galaxies from the literature, we fit a baryonic Tully-Fisher slope of M_baryon \propto vrot^(3.70+/- 0.15). This slope compares well with CDM models that assume an equal baryon to dark matter ratio at all masses. While gas stripping or other processes may modify the baryon to dark matter ratio for dwarfs in the densest environments, the majority of dwarf galaxies in our sample have not preferentially lost significant baryonic mass relative to more massive galaxies.
  • NGC 205 is the nearest example of a dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxy and the prototype of this enigmatic galaxy class. Photometric evidence suggests that NGC 205, a close satellite of the M31 galaxy, is tidally interacting with its parent galaxy. We present stellar radial velocity measurements out to a projected radius of 20' (5 kpc) in NGC 205 based on Keck/DEIMOS multislit spectroscopic observations of 725 individual red giant branch stars. Our kinematic measurements extend from the center out to six times the effective radius of NGC 205, well past the expected tidal radius. The contamination in our kinematic sample from M31 field stars is estimated to be a few percent based on maximum likelihood fits. We measure a maximum major-axis rotation speed for the body of NGC 205 of 11+/- 5 kms; this is the first dE galaxy in which the maximum rotation velocity has been measured. Combined with the velocity dispersion, we conclude that NGC 205 is supported by a combination of rotation and random motions. At a major-axis distance of 4.5' (1 kpc), the velocity profile of NGC 205 turns over; stars beyond this radius are moving counter to the rotation of the inner part of the galaxy. The turnover radius is coincident with the onset of isophotal twisting and the estimated tidal radius, suggesting that the outer kinematics of NGC 205 are dominated by gravitational interactions with the nearby M31 galaxy. The motion of stars beyond a radius of 4.5' implies that NGC 205 is in a prograde encounter with its parent galaxy M31.
  • Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in just 4.5 square degrees, we find tau = 2.17^{+0.47}_{-0.38} x 10^{-6} at (l,b) = (1.50, -2.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients (1.06 +/- 0.71) x 10^{-6} deg^{-1} and (0.29 +/- 0.43) x 10^{-6} deg^{-1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3.11, -3.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.
  • We present evidence for a counter-rotating core in the low-luminosity (M_B = -18.2) elliptical galaxy NGC 770 based on internal stellar kinematic data. This counter-rotating core is unusual as NGC 770 is not the primary galaxy in the region and it lies in an environment with evidence of on-going tidal interactions. We discovered the counter-rotating core via single-slit Keck/ESI echelle spectroscopy; subsequent integral field spectroscopy was obtained with the Gemini/GMOS IFU. The counter-rotating region has a peak rotation velocity of 21 km/s as compared to the main galaxy's rotation speed of greater than 45 km/s in the opposite direction. The counter-rotating region extends to a radius of 4'' (0.6 kpc), slightly smaller than the half-light radius of the galaxy which is 5.3'' (0.8 kpc) and is confined to a disk whose scale height is less than 0.8'' (0.1 kpc). We compute an age and metallicity of the inner counter-rotating region of 3 +/- 0.5 Gyr and [Fe/H] = 0.2 +/- 0.2 dex, based on Lick absorption-line indices. The lack of other large galaxies in this region limits possible scenarios for the formation of the counter-rotating core. We discuss several scenarios and favor one in which NGC 770 accreted a small gas-rich dwarf galaxy during a very minor merging event. If this scenario is correct, it represents one of the few known examples of merging between two dwarf-sized galaxies.
  • We present a catalog of 450 high signal-to-noise microlensing events observed by the MACHO collaboration between 1993 and 1999. The events are distributed throughout our fields and, as expected, they show clear concentration toward the Galactic center. No optical depth is given for this sample since no blending efficiency calculation has been performed, and we find evidence for substantial blending. In a companion paper we give optical depths for the sub-sample of events on clump giant source stars, where blending is not a significant effect. Several events with sources that may belong to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy are identified. For these events even relatively low dispersion spectra could suffice to classify these events as either consistent with Sagittarius membership or as non-Sagittarius sources. Several unusual events, such as microlensing of periodic variable source stars, binary lens events, and an event showing extended source effects are identified. We also identify a number of contaminating background events as cataclysmic variable stars.
  • Fourier coefficents have been derived for the $V$ and $R$ light curves of 785 overtone RR Lyrae variables in 16 MACHO fields near the bar of the LMC. The $\phi_{31}$ and $R_{21}$ coefficients have been compared with those of the first overtone RR Lyrae variables in the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6441, M107, M5, M3, M2, $\omega$ Centauri and M68. The results indicate that many of the LMC variables have properties similar to the ones in M2, M3, M5 and the Oosterhoff type I variables in $\omega$ Cen, but they are different from the Oosterhoff type II variables in $\omega$ Cen. Equations derived from hydrodynamic pulsation models have been used to calculate the luminosity and temperature for the 330 bona fide first-overtone variables. The results indicate that they have $\log L$ in the range 1.6 to $1.8\lsun$ and $\log T_{eff}$ between 3.85 and 3.87. Based on these temperatures, a mean color excess $E(V-R) =0.08$ mag, equivalent to $E(B-V)=0.14$ mag, has been estimated for these 330 stars. The 80 M5-like variables (selected according to their location in the $\phi_{31}-\log P$ plot) are used to determine a LMC distance. After correcting for the effects of extinction and crowding, a mean apparent magnitude $<V_0>=18.99 \pm 0.02$ (statistical) $\pm 0.16$ (systematic) has been estimated for these 80 stars. Combining this with a mean absolute magnitude $M_V=0.56\pm 0.06$ for M5-like stars derived from Baade-Wesselink analyses, main sequence fitting, Fourier parameters and the trigonometric parallax of RR Lyrae, we derive an LMC distance modulus $\mu=18.43\pm 0.06$ (statistical) $\pm 0.16$ (systematic) mag. The large systematic error arises from the difficulties of correcting for interstellar extinction and for crowding.
  • We have frequency analyzed 6391 variables classified earlier as fundamental mode RR Lyrae (RR0) stars in the MACHO database on the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The overwhelming majority of these variables have been proved to be indeed RR0 stars, whereas the remaining ones have fallen in one of the following categories: single- and double-mode Cepheids, binaries, first overtone and double-mode RR Lyrae stars and non-classified variables. Special attention has been paid to the Blazhko stars. We found altogether 731 Blazhko variables showing either a doublet or an equidistant triplet pattern at the main pulsation component in their frequency spectra. The incidence rate of the Blazhko variables among the RR0 stars in the LMC is 11.9%, which is three times higher than their rate among the first overtone RR Lyrae stars. From the frequency spectra we found that variables with larger modulation amplitudes at the higher frequency side of the main pulsation component are three times more frequent than the ones showing the opposite amplitude pattern. A search made for a modulation component with the Blazhko period in the average brightness of the individual variables showed the existence of such a modulation with an overall amplitude of ~0.006 mag. On the other hand, a similar search for quadruple modulation patterns around the main pulsation component have failed to clearly detect such components at the ~0.004 mag level. This means that the amplitudes of the quadruple components should be, on the average, at least ten times smaller than those of the triplet components. This finding and the existence of Blazhko variables with highly asymmetric modulation amplitudes not only question the validity of the magnetic oblique rotator model, but also puts stringent constraints on models based on mode coupling theories.
  • We present spatially-resolved internal kinematics and stellar chemical abundances for a sample of dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in the Virgo Cluster observed with Keck/ESI. We find that 4 out of 17 dEs have major axis rotation velocities consistent with rotational flattening, while the remaining dEs have no detectable major axis rotation. Despite this difference in internal kinematics, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their position in the Fundamental Plane, morphological structure, stellar populations, and local environment. We present evidence for faint underlying disks and/or weak substructure in a fraction of both rotating and non-rotating dEs, but a comparable number of counter-examples exist for both types which show no evidence of such structure. Absorption-line strengths were determined based on the Lick/IDS system (Hbeta, Mgb, Fe5270, Fe5335) for the central region of each galaxy. We find no difference in the line-strength indices, and hence stellar populations, between rotating and non-rotating dE galaxies. The best-fitting mean age and metallicity for our 17 dE sample are 5 Gyr and Fe/H = -0.3 dex, respectively, with rms spreads of 3 Gyr and 0.1 dex. The majority of dEs are consistent with solar alpha/Fe abundance ratios. By contrast, the stellar populations of classical elliptical galaxies are, on average, older, more metal rich, and alpha-enhanced relative to our dE sample. The local environments of both dEs types appear to be diverse in terms of their proximity to larger galaxies in real or velocity space within the Virgo Cluster. Thus, rotating and non-rotating dEs are remarkably similar in terms of their structure, stellar content, and local environments, presenting a significant challenge to theoretical models of their formation. (abridged)
  • We describe a few recent microlensing results from the MACHO Collaboration. The aim of the MACHO Project was the identification and quantitative description of dark and luminous matter in the Milky Way using microlensing toward the Magellanic Clouds and Galactic bulge. We start with a discussion of the HST follow-up observations of the microlensing events toward the LMC detected in the first 5 years of the experiment. Using color-magnitude diagrams we attempt to distinguish between two possible locations of the microlensing sources: 1) in the LMC or 2) behind the LMC. We conclude that unless the extinction is extremely patchy, it is very unlikely that most of the LMC events have sources behind the LMC. During an examination of the HST images of the 13 LMC events we found a very red object next to the source star of event LMC-5. Astrometry, microlensing parallax fit, and a spectrum suggest that in this case we directly image the lens - a low-mass disk star. Then we focus on the majority of events observed by the MACHO Project, which are detected toward the Galactic bulge. We argue that the microlensing optical depth toward the bulge is best measured using events that have clump giant sources, which are almost unaffected by blending. From this sample we derive a low optical depth toward the Galactic bulge of (1.4 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-6}, in good agreement with other observational constraints and with theoretical models. The presence of many long-duration events among the bulge candidates allows us to investigate the microlensing parallax effect. Events with the strongest parallax signal are probably due to massive remnants. Events MACHO-96-BLG-5 and MACHO-98-BLG-6 might have been caused by the 6-solar-mass black holes.
  • Keck/ESI spectroscopy is presented for six Virgo Cluster dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies. The mean line-of-sight velocity and velocity dispersion are resolved as a function of radius along the major axis of each galaxy, nearly doubling the total number of dEs with spatially-resolved stellar kinematics. None of the observed objects shows evidence of strong rotation: upper limits on v_rot/sigma are well below those expected for rotationally-flattened objects. Such limits place strong constraints on dE galaxy formation models. Although these galaxies continue the trend of low rotation velocities observed in Local Group dEs, they are in contrast to recent observations of large rotation velocities in slightly brighter cluster dEs. Using WFPC2 surface photometry and spherically-symmetric dynamical models, we determine global mass-to-light ratios 3 < M/L_V < 6. These ratios are comparable to those expected for an intermediate-age stellar population and are broadly consistent with the (V-I) colors of the galaxies. This implies that these dEs do not have a significant dark matter component inside an effective radius. Central black holes more massive than 10^7 M_sun can be ruled out. For the 5 nucleated dEs in our sample, we determine kinematic and photometric properties for the central nucleus separately from the underlying host dE galaxy. These nuclei are as bright or brighter than the most luminous Galactic globular clusters and lie near the region of Fundamental Plane space occupied by globular clusters. In this space, the Virgo dE galaxies lie in the same general region as Local Group and other nearby dEs, although non-rotating dEs appear to have a slightly higher mean mass and mass-to-light ratio than their rotating counterparts.
  • We present 47 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars discovered behind the Magellanic Clouds identified via photometric variability in the MACHO database. Thirty-eight quasars lie behind the Large Magellanic Cloud and nine behind the Small Magellanic Cloud, more than tripling the number of quasars previously known in this region. The quasars cover the redshift interval 0.2 < z < 2.8 and apparent mean magnitudes 16.6 < V < 20.1. We discuss the details of quasar candidate selection based on time variability in the MACHO database and present results of spectroscopic follow-up observations. Our follow-up detection efficiency was 20%; the primary contaminants were emission-line Be stars in Magellanic Clouds. For the 47 quasars discovered behind the Magellanic Clouds plus an additional 12 objects previously identified in this region, we present 7.5-year MACHO V- and R-band lightcurves with average sampling times of 2-10 days.
  • We present the photometric properties of 1279 blue variable stars within the LMC. Photometry is derived from the MACHO database. The lightcurves of the sample exhibit a variety of quasi-periodic and aperiodic outburst behavior. A characteristic feature of the photometric variation is that the objects are reddest when at maximum outburst. A subset of 102 objects were examined spectroscopically. Within this subset, 91% exhibited Balmer emission in at least one epoch, in some cases with spectacular spectral variability. The variability observed in the sample is consistent with the establishment and maintenance of the Be phenomenon.
  • We present an analysis of the longest timescale microlensing events discovered by the MACHO Collaboration during a 7 year survey of the Galactic bulge. We find 6 events that exhibit very strong microlensing parallax signals due, in part, to accurate photometric data from the GMAN and MPS collaborations. The microlensing parallax fit parameters are used in a likelihood analysis, which is able to estimate the distance and masses of the lens objects based upon a standard model of the Galactic velocity distribution. This analysis indicates that the most likely masses of 5 of the 6 lenses are > 1 Msun, which suggests that a substantial fraction of the Galactic lenses may be massive stellar remnants. This could explain the observed excess of long timescale microlensing events. The lenses for events MACHO-96-BLG-5 and MACHO-98-BLG-6 are the most massive, with mass estimates of M/Msun = 6 +10/-3 and M/Msun = 6 +7/-3, respectively. The observed upper limits on the absolute brightness of main sequence stars for these lenses are < 1 Lsun, so both lenses are black hole candidates. The black hole interpretation is also favored by a likelihood analysis with a Bayesian prior using a conventional model for the lens mass function. We consider the possibility that the source stars for some of these 6 events may lie in the foreground or background of the Galactic bulge, but we find that this is unlikely. Future HST observations of these events can either confirm the black hole lens hypothesis or detect the lens stars and provide a direct measurement of their masses. Future observations of similar events by SIM or the Keck or VLTI interferometers will allow direct measurements of the lens masses for stellar remnant lenses as well.
  • We present preliminary results of the analysis of 5 years of MACHO data on the Galactic bulge microlensing events with clump giants as sources. This class of events allows one to obtain robust conclusions because relatively bright clump stars are not strongly affected by blending. We discuss: 1) the selection of `giant' events, 2) the distribution of event durations, 3) the anomalous character of event durations and optical depth in the MACHO field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3.1, -3.0). We report the preliminary average optical depth of (2.0 +/- 0.4) x 10^{-6} (internal) at (l,b) = (3.9, -3.8), and present a map of the spatial distribution of the optical depth. When field 104 is removed from the sample, the optical depth drops to (1.4 +/- 0.3) x 10^{-6}, which is in excellent agreement with infrared-based models of the central Galactic region.