• We present a data-adaptive spectral method - Monte Carlo Singular Spectrum Analysis (MC-SSA) - and its modification to tackle astrophysical problems. Through numerical simulations we show the ability of the MC-SSA in dealing with $1/f^{\beta}$ power-law noise affected by photon counting statistics. Such noise process is simulated by a first-order autoregressive, AR(1) process corrupted by intrinsic Poisson noise. In doing so, we statistically estimate a basic stochastic variation of the source and the corresponding fluctuations due to the quantum nature of light. In addition, MC-SSA test retains its effectiveness even when a significant percentage of the signal falls below a certain level of detection, e.g., caused by the instrument sensitivity. The parsimonious approach presented here may be broadly applied, from the search for extrasolar planets to the extraction of low-intensity coherent phenomena probably hidden in high energy transients.
  • We introduce economic models based on Boolean Delay Equations: this formalism makes easier to take into account the complexity of the interactions between firms and is particularly appropriate for studying the propagation of an initial damage due to a catastrophe. Here we concentrate on simple cases, which allow to understand the effects of multiple concurrent production paths as well as the presence of stochasticity in the path time lengths or in the network structure. In absence of flexibility, the shortening of production of a single firm in an isolated network with multiple connections usually ends up by attaining a finite fraction of the firms or the whole economy, whereas the interactions with the outside allow a partial recovering of the activity, giving rise to periodic solutions with waves of damage which propagate across the structure. The damage propagation speed is strongly dependent upon the topology. The existence of multiple concurrent production paths does not necessarily imply a slowing down of the propagation, which can be as fast as the shortest path.
  • The Jupiter-Saturn 2:5 near-commensurability is analyzed in a fully analytic Hamiltonian planetary theory. Computations for the Sun-Jupiter-Saturn system, extending to the third order of the masses and to the 8th degree in the eccentricities and inclinations, reveal an unexpectedly sensitive dependence of the solution on initial data and its likely nonconvergence. The source of the sensitivity and apparent lack of convergence is this near-commensurability, the so-called great inequality. This indicates that simple averaging, still common in current semi-analytic planetary theories, may not be an adequate technique to obtain information on the long-term dynamics of the Solar System. Preliminary results suggest that these difficulties can be overcome by using resonant normal forms.