• Ultrafast pump-probe experiments open the possibility to track fundamental material behavior like changes in its electronic configuration in real time. So far, such measurements have widely relied on high harmonic generation (HHG) with ultrashort laser pulses, limiting the achievable wavelength range to the extreme ultraviolet regime. However, to directly excite site-specific core states of molecules or more complex systems, photon energies in the water window and above are required. Novel light sources based on laser-driven electron accelerators have demonstrated bright radiation production over a wide energy range. Given the phase space of the electron bunches could be shaped in an adequate way, these sources would also be suitable for high-energy ultrafast pump-probe experimentation. Here, we report for the first time on the simultaneous generation of two monoenergetic electron bunches with individually tunable energy up to several hundred MeV. Due to the underlying injection physics, the lengths of the bunches as well as their temporal separation inherently amount to femtoseconds. In combination with established beam-handling and insertion devices, these results pave the way to laboratory-scale multi-beam experiments with unprecedented scope in energy tuning and time resolution.
  • Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons represents a basis for several types of novel X-ray sources based on Thomson scattering or betatron radiation. The latter provides a high photon flux and a small source size, both being prerequisites for high-quality X-ray imaging. Furthermore, proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated its application for tomographic imaging. So far this required several hours of acquisition time for a complete tomographic data set. Based on improvements to the laser system, detectors and reconstruction algorithms, we were able to reduce this time for a full tomographic scan to 3 minutes. In this paper, we discuss these results and give a prospect to future imaging systems.
  • Laser-driven X-ray sources are an emerging alternative to conventional X-ray tubes and synchrotron sources. We present results on microtomographic X-ray imaging of a cancellous human bone sample using synchrotron-like betatron radiation. The source is driven by a 100-TW-class titanium-sapphire laser system and delivers over $10^8$ X-ray photons per second. Compared to earlier studies, the acquisition time for an entire tomographic dataset has been reduced by more than an order of magnitude. Additionally, the reconstruction quality benefits from the use of statistical iterative reconstruction techniques. Depending on the desired resolution, tomographies are thereby acquired within minutes, which is an important milestone towards real-life applications of laser-plasma X-ray sources.