• The Gaia Data Release 2 (DR2): we summarise the processing and results of the identification of variable source candidates of RR Lyrae stars, Cepheids, long period variables (LPVs), rotation modulation (BY Dra-type) stars, delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and short-timescale variables. In this release we aim to provide useful but not necessarily complete samples of candidates. The processed Gaia data consist of the G, BP, and RP photometry during the first 22 months of operations as well as positions and parallaxes. Various methods from classical statistics, data mining and time series analysis were applied and tailored to the specific properties of Gaia data, as well as various visualisation tools. The DR2 variability release contains: 228'904 RR Lyrae stars, 11'438 Cepheids, 151'761 LPVs, 147'535 stars with rotation modulation, 8'882 delta Scuti & SX Phoenicis stars, and 3'018 short-timescale variables. These results are distributed over a classification and various Specific Object Studies (SOS) tables in the Gaia archive, along with the three-band time series and associated statistics for the underlying 550'737 unique sources. We estimate that about half of them are newly identified variables. The variability type completeness varies strongly as function of sky position due to the non-uniform sky coverage and intermediate calibration level of this data. The probabilistic and automated nature of this work implies certain completeness and contamination rates which are quantified so that users can anticipate their effects. This means that even well-known variable sources can be missed or misidentified in the published data. The DR2 variability release only represents a small subset of the processed data. Future releases will include more variable sources and data products; however, DR2 shows the (already) very high quality of the data and great promise for variability studies.
  • The ESA Gaia mission provides a unique time-domain survey for more than 1.6 billion sources with G ~ 21 mag. We showcase stellar variability across the Galactic colour-absolute magnitude diagram (CaMD), focusing on pulsating, eruptive, and cataclysmic variables, as well as on stars exhibiting variability due to rotation and eclipses. We illustrate the locations of variable star classes, variable object fractions, and typical variability amplitudes throughout the CaMD and illustrate how variability-related changes in colour and brightness induce `motions' using 22 months worth of calibrated photometric, spectro-photometric, and astrometric Gaia data of stars with significant parallax. To ensure a large variety of variable star classes to populate the CaMD, we crossmatch Gaia sources with known variable stars. We also used the statistics and variability detection modules of the Gaia variability pipeline. Corrections for interstellar extinction are not implemented in this article. Gaia enables the first investigation of Galactic variable star populations across the CaMD on a similar, if not larger, scale than previously done in the Magellanic Clouds. Despite observed colours not being reddening corrected, we clearly see distinct regions where variable stars occur and determine variable star fractions to within Gaia's current detection thresholds. Finally, we show the most complete description of variability-induced motion within the CaMD to date. Gaia enables novel insights into variability phenomena for an unprecedented number of stars, which will benefit the understanding of stellar astrophysics. The CaMD of Galactic variable stars provides crucial information on physical origins of variability in a way previously accessible only for Galactic star clusters or external galaxies.
  • The ESA Gaia mission provides a unique time-domain survey for more than one billion sources brighter than G=20.7 mag. Gaia offers the unprecedented opportunity to study variability phenomena in the Universe thanks to multi-epoch G-magnitude photometry in addition to astrometry, blue and red spectro-photometry, and spectroscopy. Within the Gaia Consortium, Coordination Unit 7 has the responsibility to detect variable objects, classify them, derive characteristic parameters for specific variability classes, and provide global descriptions of variable phenomena. We describe the variability processing and analysis that we plan to apply to the successive data releases, and we present its application to the G-band photometry results of the first 14 months of Gaia operations that comprises 28 days of Ecliptic Pole Scanning Law and 13 months of Nominal Scanning Law. Out of the 694 million, all-sky, sources that have calibrated G-band photometry in this first stage of the mission, about 2.3 million sources that have at least 20 observations are located within 38 degrees from the South Ecliptic Pole. We detect about 14% of them as variable candidates, among which the automated classification identified 9347 Cepheid and RR Lyrae candidates. Additional visual inspections and selection criteria led to the publication of 3194 Cepheid and RR Lyrae stars, described in Clementini et al. (2016). Under the restrictive conditions for DR1, the completenesses of Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars are estimated at 67% and 58%, respectively, numbers that will significantly increase with subsequent Gaia data releases. Data processing within the Gaia Consortium is iterative, the quality of the data and the results being improved at each iteration. The results presented in this article show a glimpse of the exceptional harvest that is to be expected from the Gaia mission for variability phenomena. [abridged]
  • A sample of mostly old metal-rich dwarf and turn-off stars with high eccentricity and low maximum height above the Galactic plane has been identified. From their kinematics, it was suggested that the inner disk is their most probable birthplace. Their chemical imprints may therefore reveal important information about the formation and evolution of the still poorly understood inner disk. To probe the formation history of these stellar populations, a detailed analysis of a sample of very metal-rich stars is carried out. We derive the metallicities, abundances of \alpha\ elements, ages, and Galactic orbits. The analysis of 71 metal-rich stars is based on optical high-resolution \'echelle spectra obtained with the FEROS spectrograph at the ESO 1.52-m Telescope at La Silla, Chile. The metallicities and abundances of C, O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti were derived based on LTE detailed analysis, employing the MARCS model atmospheres. We confirm the high metallicity of these stars reaching up to [Fe I/H]~0.58, and the sample of metal-rich dwarfs can be kinematically subclassified in samples of thick disk, thin disk, and intermediate stellar populations. All sample stars show solar \alpha-Fe ratios, and most of them are old and still quite metal rich. The orbits suggest that the thin disk, thick disk and intermediate populations were formed at Galactocentric distances of ~8 kpc, ~6 kpc, and ~7 kpc, respectively. The mean maximum height of the thick disk subsample of Z_max~380 pc, is lower than for typical thick disk stars. A comparison of \alpha-element abundances of the sample stars with bulge stars shows that the oxygen is compatible with a bulge or inner thick disk origin. Our results suggest that models of radial mixing and dynamical effects of the bar and bar/spiral arms might explain the presence of these old metal-rich dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood.
  • The European Gaia astrometry mission is due for launch in 2011. Gaia will rely on the proven principles of ESA's Hipparcos mission to create an all-sky survey of about one billion stars throughout our Galaxy and beyond, by observing all objects down to 20th magnitude. Through its massive measurement of stellar distances, motions and multi-colour photometry it will provide fundamental data necessary for unravelling the structure, formation and evolution of the Galaxy. This paper presents the design and performance of the broad- and medium-band set of photometric filters adopted as the baseline for Gaia. The nineteen selected passbands (extending from the ultraviolet to the far-red), the criteria, and the methodology on which this choice has been based are discussed in detail. We analyse the photometric capabilities for characterizing the luminosity, temperature, gravity and chemical composition of stars. We also discuss the automatic determination of these physical parameters for the large number of observations involved, for objects located throughout the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Finally, the capability of the photometric system to deal with the main Gaia science case is outlined.
  • Accurate photometry was obtained for all programme stars during the 3.3-year HIPPARCOS mission. The final observing programme included several hundred Mirae (M), semiregular (SR) long-period and irregular (L) variables. A detailed calibration of the aging of the optics allowed the evaluation of very precise magnitudes over the whole range of star colours. Since the time coverage of the satellite observations was not sufficient to describe the behaviour of M, SR, or L type variables, smooth curves were fitted statistically to the dense AAVSO observations. These curves were then transformed to the HIPPARCOS system in order to complement the HIPPARCOS photometry and thus produce precise light curves with fuller time coverage, for a set of several hundred late-type variables, including most Carbon stars brighter than V = 12.4 at minimum luminosity. A preliminary discussion of the behaviour of C stars, as observed from the space in the broad Hp band, is given.
  • Using available kinematical data for a subsample of NLTT stars from the HIPPARCOS mission we confirm the existence of a previously reported local anomaly in the (u,v) plane: the mean motion u for old disc stars, with v < -30 km/s, is largely positive (+19 +/- 9 km/s w.r.t. the Galactic Center). With the use of the newest global self-consistent numerical models of our Galaxy, we show that a bar could be responsible for this observed velocity anomaly. A fraction of our stars have bar perturbed ``hot'' orbits, allowing them to erratically wander from inside the bar to regions outside the corotation, in particular through the solar neighbourhood.
  • We report detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra of nine high velocity metal-rich dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. The stars are super metal-rich and 5 of them have [Fe/H]>=+0.4, making them the most metal-rich stars currently known. We find that alpha-elements decrease with increasing metallicity; s-elements are underabundant by about [s-elements/Fe]=-0.3. While exceeding the [Fe/H] of current bulge samples, the chemistry of these stars has important similarities and differences. The near-solar abundances of the alpha-capture elements places these stars on the metal-rich extension of McWilliam & Rich (1994) [ApJS, 91, 749], but their s-process abundances are much lower than those of the bulge giants. These low s-process values have been interpreted as the hallmark of an ancient stellar population.