• The search of life in the Universe is a fundamental problem of astrobiology and a major priority for NASA. A key area of major progress since the NASA Astrobiology Strategy 2015 (NAS15) has been a shift from the exoplanet discovery phase to a phase of characterization and modeling of the physics and chemistry of exoplanetary atmospheres, and the development of observational strategies for the search for life in the Universe by combining expertise from four NASA science disciplines including heliophysics, astrophysics, planetary science and Earth science. The NASA Nexus for Exoplanetary System Science (NExSS) has provided an efficient environment for such interdisciplinary studies. Solar flares, coronal mass ejections and solar energetic particles produce disturbances in interplanetary space collectively referred to as space weather, which interacts with the Earth upper atmosphere and causes dramatic impact on space and ground-based technological systems. Exoplanets within close in habitable zones around M dwarfs and other active stars are exposed to extreme ionizing radiation fluxes, thus making exoplanetary space weather (ESW) effects a crucial factor of habitability. In this paper, we describe the recent developments and provide recommendations in this interdisciplinary effort with the focus on the impacts of ESW on habitability, and the prospects for future progress in searching for signs of life in the Universe as the outcome of the NExSS workshop held in Nov 29 - Dec 2, 2016, New Orleans, LA. This is one of five Life Beyond the Solar System white papers submitted by NExSS to the National Academy of Sciences in support of the Astrobiology Science Strategy for the Search for Life in the Universe.
  • The preflare phase of the flare SOL2011-08-09T03:52 is unique in its long duration, its coverage by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the presence of three well-developed soft X-ray (SXR) peaks. No hard X-rays (HXR) are observed in the preflare phase. Here we report that also no associated radio emission at 17 GHz was found despite the higher sensitivity of the radio instrument. The ratio between the SXR peaks and the upper limit of the radio peaks is larger by more than one order of magnitude compared to regular flares. The result suggests that the ratio between acceleration and heating in the preflare phase was different than in regular flares. Acceleration to relativistic energies, if any, occurred with lower efficiency.
  • For the hot exoplanets CoRoT-24b and CoRoT-24c, observations have provided transit radii R$_{\rm T}$ of 3.7$\pm$0.4 R$_{\oplus}$ and 4.9$\pm$0.5 R$_{\oplus}$, and masses of $\le$5.7 M$_{\oplus}$ and 28$\pm$11 M$_{\oplus}$, respectively. We study their upper atmosphere structure and escape applying an hydrodynamic model. Assuming R$_{\rm T} \approx$ R$_{\rm PL}$, where R$_{\rm PL}$ is the planetary radius at the pressure of 100 mbar, we obtained for CoRoT-24b unrealistically high thermally-driven hydrodynamic escape rates. This is due to the planet's high temperature and low gravity, independent of the stellar EUV flux. Such high escape rates could last only for $<$100 Myr, while R$_{\rm PL}$ shrinks till the escape rate becomes less than or equal to the maximum possible EUV-driven escape rate. For CoRoT-24b, R$_{\rm PL}$ must be therefore located at $\approx 1.9-2.2$ R$_{\oplus}$ and high altitude hazes/clouds possibly extinct the light at R$_{\rm T}$. Our analysis constraints also the planet's mass to be 5$-$5.7 M$_{\oplus}$. For CoRoT-24c, R$_{\rm PL}$ and R$_{\rm T}$ lie too close together to be distinguished in the same way. Similar differences between R$_{\rm PL}$ and R$_{\rm T}$ may be present also for other hot, low-density sub-Neptunes.
  • We report on an analysis of high-precision, multi-colour photometric observations of the rapidly-oscillating Ap (roAp) star $\alpha$ Cir. These observations were obtained with the BRITE-Constellation, which is a coordinated mission of five nanosatellites that collects continuous millimagnitude-precision photometry of dozens of bright stars for up to 180 days at a time in two colours (Johnson B and R). BRITE stands for BRight Target Explorer. The object $\alpha$ Cir is the brightest roAp star and an ideal target for such investigations, facilitating the determination of oscillation frequencies with high resolution. This star is bright enough for complementary interferometry and time-resolved spectroscopy. Four BRITE satellites observed $\alpha$ Cir for 146 d or 33 rotational cycles. Phasing the photometry according to the 4.4790 d rotational period reveals qualitatively different light variations in the two photometric bands. The phased red-band photometry is in good agreement with previously-published WIRE data, showing a light curve symmetric about phase 0.5 with a strong contribution from the first harmonic. The phased blue-band data, in contrast, show an essentially sinusoidal variation. We model both light curves with Bayesian Photometric Imaging, which suggests the presence of two large-scale, photometrically bright (relative to the surrounding photosphere) spots. We also examine the high-frequency pulsation spectrum as encoded in the BRITE photometry. Our analysis establishes the stability of the main pulsation frequency over the last 20 years, confirms the presence of frequency f7, which was not detected (or the mode not excited) prior to 2006, and excludes quadrupolar modes for the main pulsation frequency.
  • Exoplanet science is now in its full expansion, particularly after the CoRoT and Kepler space missions that led us to the discovery of thousands of extra-solar planets. The last decade has taught us that UV observations play a major role in advancing our understanding of planets and of their host stars, but the necessary UV observations can be carried out only by HST, and this is going to be the case for many years to come. It is therefore crucial to build a treasury data archive of UV exoplanet observations formed by a dozen "golden systems" for which observations will be available from the UV to the infrared. Only in this way we will be able to fully exploit JWST observations for exoplanet science, one of the key JWST science case.
  • The short-period (1.64 d) near-contact eclipsing WN6+O9 binary system CQ Cep provides an ideal laboratory for testing the predictions of X-ray colliding wind shock theory at close separation where the winds may not have reached terminal speeds before colliding. We present results of a Chandra X-ray observation of CQ Cep spanning ~1 day during which a simultaneous Chandra optical light curve was acquired. Our primary objective was to compare the observed X-ray properties with colliding wind shock theory, which predicts that the hottest shock plasma (T > 20 MK) will form on or near the line-of-centers between the stars. The X-ray spectrum is strikingly similar to apparently single WN6 stars such as WR 134 and spectral lines reveal plasma over a broad range of temperatures T ~ 4 - 40 MK. A deep optical eclipse was seen as the O star passed in front of the Wolf-Rayet star and we determine an orbital period P = 1.6412400 d. Somewhat surprisingly, no significant X-ray variability was detected. This implies that the hottest X-ray plasma is not confined to the region between the stars, at odds with the colliding wind picture and suggesting that other X-ray production mechanisms may be at work. Hydrodynamic simulations that account for such effects as radiative cooling and orbital motion will be needed to determine if the new Chandra results can be reconciled with the colliding wind picture.
  • With the discovery of hundreds of exoplanets and a potentially huge number of Earth-like planets waiting to be discovered, the conditions for their habitability have become a focal point in exoplanetary research. The classical picture of habitable zones primarily relies on the stellar flux allowing liquid water to exist on the surface of an Earth-like planet with a suitable atmosphere. However, numerous further stellar and planetary properties constrain habitability. Apart from "geophysical" processes depending on the internal structure and composition of a planet, a complex array of astrophysical factors additionally determine habitability. Among these, variable stellar UV, EUV, and X-ray radiation, stellar and interplanetary magnetic fields, ionized winds, and energetic particles control the constitution of upper planetary atmospheres and their physical and chemical evolution. Short- and long-term stellar variability necessitates full time-dependent studies to understand planetary habitability at any point in time. Furthermore, dynamical effects in planetary systems and transport of water to Earth-like planets set fundamentally important constraints. We will review these astrophysical conditions for habitability under the crucial aspects of the long-term evolution of stellar properties, the consequent extreme conditions in the early evolutionary phase of planetary systems, and the important interplay between properties of the host star and its planets.
  • BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, the brightness and temperature variations of stars generally brighter than mag(V) ~ 4, with precision and time coverage not possible from the ground. The current mission design consists of six nanosats (hence Constellation): two from Austria, two from Canada, and two from Poland. Each 7 kg nanosat carries an optical telescope of aperture 3 cm feeding an uncooled CCD. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter, the other with a red filter. Each BRITE instrument has a wide field of view (~24 degrees), so up to about 15 bright stars can be observed simultaneously, sampled in 32 pixel x 32 pixel sub-rasters. Photometry of additional fainter targets, with reduced precision but thorough time sampling, will be possible through onboard data processing. The BRITE sample is dominated by the most intrinsically luminous stars: massive stars seen at all evolutionary stages, and evolved medium-class stars at the very end of their nuclear burning phases. The goals of BRITE-Constellation are to (1) measure p- and g-mode pulsations to probe the interiors and ages of stars through asteroseismology; (2) look for varying spots on the stars surfaces carried across the stellar disks by rotation, which are the sources of co-rotating interaction regions in the winds of the most luminous stars, probably arising from magnetic subsurface convection; and (3) search for planetary transits.
  • We present a deep XMM-Newton observation of DN Tau, a young M0-type accreting CTTS and investigate its X-ray properties and X-ray generating mechanisms. Specifically we examine the presence of X-ray emission from magnetic activity and accretion shocks and compare our new X-ray data with UV data taken simultaneously and with X-ray/UV observations performed before. We find that the X-ray emission from DN Tau is dominated by coronal plasma generated via magnetic activity, but also clearly detect a contribution of the accretion shocks to the cool plasma component at about 2 MK as consistently inferred from density and temperature analysis. Typical phenomena of active coronae like flaring, the presence of very hot plasma at 30 MK and an abundance pattern showing the inverse FIP effect are seen on DN Tau. Strong variations in the emission measure of the cooler plasma components between the 2005 and 2010 XMM data point to accretion related changes. The UV light curve taken simultaneously is in general not related to the X-ray brightness, but exhibits clear counterparts during the observed X-ray flares. The X-ray properties of DN Tau are similar to those of more massive CTTS, but its low mass and large radius shift the accretion shocks to lower temperatures, reducing their imprint in the X-ray regime.
  • BRITE-Constellation (where BRITE stands for BRIght Target Explorer) is an international nanosatellite mission to monitor photometrically, in two colours, brightness and temperature variations of stars brighter than V = 4. The current mission design consists of three pairs of 7 kg nanosats from Austria, Canada and Poland carrying optical telescopes and CCDs. One instrument in each pair is equipped with a blue filter; the other, a red filter. The first two nanosats are UNIBRITE, designed and built by University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - Space Flight Laboratory and its twin, BRITE-Austria, built by the Technical University Graz with support of UTIAS-SFL. They were launched on 25 February 2013 by the Indian Space Agency under contract to the Canadian Space Agency into a low-Earth dusk-dawn polar orbit.
  • One of the best-studied jets from all young stellar objects is the jet of DG Tau, which we imaged in the FUV with HST for the first time. These high spatial resolution images were obtained with long-pass filters and allow us to construct images tracing mainly molecular hydrogen and C IV emission. We find that the H2 emission appears as a limb-brightened cone with additional emission close to the jet axis. The length of the rims is about 0.3 arcsec or 42 AU (proj.) before their brightness strongly drops, and the opening angle is about 90 deg. Comparing our FUV data with near-IR data we find that the fluorescent H2 emission likely traces the outer, cooler part of the disk wind while an origin of the H2 emission in the surface layers (atmosphere) of the (flared) disk is unlikely. Furthermore, the spatial shape of the H2 emission shows little variation over six years which suggests that the outer part of the disk wind is rather stable and probably not associated with the formation of individual knots. The C IV image shows that the emission is concentrated towards the jet axis. We find no indications for additional C IV emission at larger distances, which strengthens the association with the X-ray emission observed to originate within the DG Tau jet.
  • Protostellar jets are tightly connected to the accretion process and regulate the angular momentum balance of accreting star-disk systems. The DG Tau jet is one of the best-studied protostellar jets and contains plasma with temperatures ranging over three orders of magnitude within the innermost 50 AU of the jet. We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) far ultraviolet (FUV) long-slit spectra spatially resolving the C IV emission (T~1e5 K) from the jet for the first time, and quasi-simultaneous HST observations of optical forbidden emission lines ([O I], [N II], [S II] and [O III]) and fluorescent H2 lines. The C IV emission peaks at 42 AU from the stellar position and has a FWHM of 52 AU along the jet. Its deprojected velocity of around 200 km/s decreases monotonically away from the driving source. In addition, we compare our HST data with the X-ray emission from the DG Tau jet. We investigate the requirements to explain the data by an initially hot jet compared to local heating. Both scenarios indicate a mass loss by the T~1e5 K jet of ~1e-9 Msun/year, i.e., between the values for the lower temperature jet (T~1e4 K) and the hotter X-ray emitting part (T>1e6 K). However, a simple initially hot wind requires a large launching region (~1 AU), and we therefore favor local heating.
  • The most powerful explosions on the Sun [...] drive the most severe space-weather storms. Proxy records of flare energies based on SEPs in principle may offer the longest time base to study infrequent large events. We conclude that one suggested proxy, nitrate concentrations in polar ice cores, does not map reliably to SEP events. Concentrations of select radionuclides measured in natural archives may prove useful in extending the time interval of direct observations up to ten millennia, but as their calibration to solar flare fluences depends on multiple poorly known properties and processes, these proxies cannot presently be used to help determine the flare energy frequency distribution. Being thus limited to the use of direct flare observations, we evaluate the probabilities of large-energy solar explosions by combining solar flare observations with an ensemble of stellar flare observations. We conclude that solar flare energies form a relatively smooth distribution from small events to large flares, while flares on magnetically-active, young Sun-like stars have energies and frequencies markedly in excess of strong solar flares, even after an empirical scaling with the mean activity level of these stars. In order to empirically quantify the frequency of uncommonly large solar flares extensive surveys of stars of near-solar age need to be obtained, such as is feasible with the Kepler satellite. Because the likelihood of flares larger than approximately X30 remains empirically unconstrained, we present indirect arguments, based on records of sunspots and on statistical arguments, that solar flares in the past four centuries have likely not substantially exceeded the level of the largest flares observed in the space era, and that there is at most about a 10% chance of a flare larger than about X30 in the next 30 years.
  • {Abridged version for ArXiv}. We provide direct constraints on the origin of the [Ne II] emission in 15 young stars using high-spatial and spectral resolution observations with VISIR at the VLT that allow us to study the kinematics of the emitting gas. In addition we compare the [Ne II] line with optical forbidden lines observed for three stars with UVES. The [Ne II] line was detected in 7 stars, among them the first confirmed detection of [Ne II] in a Herbig Be star, V892 Tau. In four cases, the large blueshifted lines indicate an origin in a jet. In two stars, the small shifts and asymmetric profiles indicate an origin in a photo-evaporative wind. CoKu Tau 1, seen close to edge-on, shows a spatially unresolved line centered at the stellar rest velocity, although cross-dispersion centroids move within 10 AU from one side of the star to the other as a function of wavelength. The line profile is symmetric with wings extending up to about +-80 km/s. The origin of the [Ne II] line could either be due to the bipolar jet or to the disk. For the stars with VLT-UVES observations, in several cases, the optical forbidden line profiles and shifts are very similar to the profile of the [Ne II] line, suggesting that the lines are emitted in the same region. A general trend observed with VISIR is a lower line flux when compared with the fluxes obtained with Spitzer. We found no correlation between the line full-width at half maximum and the line peak velocity. The [Ne II] line remains undetected in a large part of the sample, an indication that the emission detected with Spitzer in those stars is likely extended.
  • We report results of a sensitive Chandra ACIS-S observation of the classical T Tauri star RY Tau. Previous studies have shown that it drives a spectacular bipolar jet whose blueshifted component is traced optically along P.A. approximately 295 degrees at separations of 1.5 - 31 arcseconds from the star. Complex X-ray emission is revealed, including a very soft non-variable spectral component (some of which may originate in shocks), a superhot flaring component (T >= 100 MK), and faint extended structure near the star. The structure is visible in deconvolved images and extends northwestward out to a separation of 1.7 arcseconds, overlapping the inner part of the optical jet. Image analysis suggests that most of the extension is real, but some contamination by PSF-induced structure within the central arcsecond may be present. The predicted temperature for a shock-heated jet based on jet speed and shock speed estimates from optical measurements is too low to explain the extended X-ray structure. Either higher speed material within the jet has escaped optical detection or other mechanisms besides shock-heating are involved. Alternative mechanisms that could produce higher temperature plasma at small offsets to the northwest of RY Tau include magnetic heating in the jet, hot plasmoids ejected at high speeds, or X-ray emission from a putative close companion whose presence has been inferred from Hipparcos variations.
  • J.W. den Herder, L. Piro, T. Ohashi, C. Kouveliotou, D.H. Hartmann, J.S. Kaastra, L. Amati, M.I. Andersen, M. Arnaud, J-L. Attéia, S. Bandler, M. Barbera, X. Barcons, S. Barthelmy, S. Basa, S. Basso, M. Boer, E. Branchini, G. Branduardi-Raymont, S. Borgani, A. Boyarsky, G. Brunetti, C. Budtz-Jorgensen, D. Burrows, N. Butler, S. Campana, E. Caroli, M. Ceballos, F. Christensen, E. Churazov, A. Comastri, L. Colasanti, R. Cole, R. Content, A. Corsi, E. Costantini, P. Conconi, G. Cusumano, J. de Plaa, A. De Rosa, M. Del Santo, S. Di Cosimo, M. De Pasquale, R. Doriese, S. Ettori, P. Evans, Y. Ezoe, L. Ferrari, H. Finger, T. Figueroa-Feliciano, P. Friedrich, R. Fujimoto, A. Furuzawa, J. Fynbo, F. Gatti, M. Galeazzi, N. Gehrels, B. Gendre, G. Ghirlanda, G. Ghisellini, M. Gilfanov, P. Giommi, M. Girardi, J. Grindlay, M. Cocchi, O. Godet, M. Guedel, F. Haardt, R. den Hartog, I. Hepburn, W. Hermsen, J. Hjorth, H. Hoekstra, A. Holland, A. Hornstrup, A. van der Horst, A. Hoshino, J. in 't Zand, K. Irwin, Y. Ishisaki, P. Jonker, T. Kitayama, H. Kawahara, N. Kawai, R. Kelley, C. Kilbourne, P. de Korte, A. Kusenko, I. Kuvvetli, M. Labanti, C. Macculi, R. Maiolino, M. Mas Hesse, K. Matsushita, P. Mazzotta, D. McCammon, M. Méndez, R. Mignani, T. Mineo, K. Mitsuda, R. Mushotzky, S. Molendi, L. Moscardini, L. Natalucci, F. Nicastro, P. O'Brien, J. Osborne, F. Paerels, M. Page, S. Paltani, K. Pedersen, E. Perinati, T. Ponman, E. Pointecouteau, P. Predehl, S. Porter, A. Rasmussen, G. Rauw, H. Röttgering, M. Roncarelli, P. Rosati, E. Quadrini, O. Ruchayskiy, R. Salvaterra, S. Sasaki, K. Sato, S. Savaglio, J. Schaye, S. Sciortino, M. Shaposhnikov, R. Sharples, K. Shinozaki, D. Spiga, R. Sunyaev, Y. Suto, Y. Takei, N. Tanvir, M. Tashiro, T. Tamura, Y. Tawara, E. Troja, M. Tsujimoto, T. Tsuru, P. Ubertini, J. Ullom, E. Ursino, F. Verbunt, F. van de Voort, M. Viel, S. Wachter, D. Watson, M. Weisskopf, N. Werner, N. White, R. Willingale, R. Wijers, N. Yamasaki, K. Yoshikawa, S. Zane
    ORIGIN is a proposal for the M3 mission call of ESA aimed at the study of metal creation from the epoch of cosmic dawn. Using high-spectral resolution in the soft X-ray band, ORIGIN will be able to identify the physical conditions of all abundant elements between C and Ni to red-shifts of z=10, and beyond. The mission will answer questions such as: When were the first metals created? How does the cosmic metal content evolve? Where do most of the metals reside in the Universe? What is the role of metals in structure formation and evolution? To reach out to the early Universe ORIGIN will use Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) to study their local environments in their host galaxies. This requires the capability to slew the satellite in less than a minute to the GRB location. By studying the chemical composition and properties of clusters of galaxies we can extend the range of exploration to lower redshifts (z ~ 0.2). For this task we need a high-resolution spectral imaging instrument with a large field of view. Using the same instrument, we can also study the so far only partially detected baryons in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM). The less dense part of the WHIM will be studied using absorption lines at low redshift in the spectra for GRBs.
  • We report on new X-ray observations of the classical T Tauri star DG Tau. DG Tau drives a collimated bi-polar jet known to be a source of X-ray emission perhaps driven by internal shocks. The rather modest extinction permits study of the jet system to distances very close to the star itself. Our initial results presented here show that the spatially resolved X-ray jet has been moving and fading during the past six years. In contrast, a stationary, very soft source much closer (~ 0.15-0.2") to the star but apparently also related to the jet has brightened during the same period. We report accurate temperatures and absorption column densities toward this source, which is probably associated with the jet base or the jet collimation region.
  • (Abridged) We have conducted a study of [NeII] line emission based on a sample of 92 pre-main sequence stars mostly belonging to the infrared Class II, including 13 accreting transition disk objects and 14 objects driving jets and outflows. We find several significant correlations between L[NeII] and stellar parameters, in particular LX and the wind mass loss rate, dM/dt. Most correlations are, however, strongly dominated by systematic scatter. While there is a positive correlation between L[NeII] and LX, the stellar mass accretion rate, dMacc/dt, induces a correlation only if we combine the largely different subsets of jet sources and stars without jets. Our results suggest that L[NeII] is bi-modally distributed, with separate distributions for the two subsamples. The jet sources show systematically higher L[NeII], by 1-2 orders of magnitude with respect to objects without jets. Jet-driving stars also tend to show higher mass accretion rates. We therefore hypothesize that the trend with dMacc/dt reflects a trend with dM/dt that is more physically relevant for [NeII] emission. L[NeII] measured for objects without known outflows and jets is found to agree with simplified calculations of [NeII] emission from disk surface layers if the measured stellar X-rays are responsible for heating and ionizing of the gas. The large scatter in L[NeII] may be introduced by variations of disk properties and the irradiation spectrum, as previously suggested. The systematically enhanced [NeII] flux from jet sources clearly suggests a role for the jets themselves, as previously demonstrated by a spatially resolved observation of the outflow system in the T Tau triple.
  • Classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) differ in their X-ray signatures from older pre-main sequence stars, e.g. weak-lined TTS (WTTS). CTTS show a soft excess and deviations from the low-density coronal limit in the He-like triplets. We test whether these features correlate with accretion or the presence of a disk by observing IM Lup, a disk-bearing object apparently in transition between CTTS and WTTS without obvious accretion. We analyse a Chandra grating spectrum and additional XMM-Newton data of IM Lup and accompanying optical spectra, some of them taken simultaneously to the X-ray observations. We fit the X-ray emission lines and decompose the Ha emission line in different components. In X-rays IM Lup has a bright and hot active corona, where elements of low first-ionisation potential are depleted. The He-like Ne IX triplet is in the low-density state, but due to the small number of counts a high-density scenario cannot be excluded on the 90% confidence level. In all X-ray properties IM Lup resembles a main-sequence star, but it is also compatible with CTTS signatures on the 90% confidence level, thus we cannot decide if the soft excess and deviations from the low-density coronal limit in the He-like triplets in CTTS require accretion or only the presence of a disk. IM Lup is chromospherically active, which explains most of the emission in Ha. Despite its low equivalent width, the complexity of the Ha line profile is reminiscent of CTTS. We present an estimate for the mass accretion rate of 10e-11 Msun/yr.
  • Aims. The brown dwarf (BD) formation process has not yet been completely understood. To shed more light on the differences and similarities between star and BD formation processes, we study and compare the disk fraction among both kinds of objects over a large angular region in the Taurus cloud. In addition, we examine the spatial distribution of stars and BD relative to the underlying molecular gas Methods. In this paper, we present new and updated photometry data from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope on 43 BDs in the Taurus cloud, and recalculate of the BD disk fraction in this region. We also useed recently available CO mm data to study the spatial distribution of stars and BDs relative to the cloud's molecular gas. Results. We find that the disk fraction among BDs in the Taurus cloud is 41 \pm 12%, a value statistically consistent with the one among TTS (58 \pm 9%). We find that BDs in transition from a state where they have a disk to a diskless state are rare, and we study one isolated example of a transitional disk with an inner radius of \approx 0.1 AU (CFHT BD Tau 12, found via its relatively small mid-IR excess compared to most members of Taurus that have disks. We find that BDs are statistically found in regions of similar molecular gas surface density to those associated with stars. Furthermore, we find that the gas column density distribution is almost identical for stellar and substellar objects with and without disks.
  • We summarize new X-ray detections of four nitrogen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars obtained in a limited survey aimed at establishing the X-ray properties of WN stars across their full range of spectral subtypes. None of the detected stars is so far known to be a close binary. We report Chandra detections of WR 2 (WN2), WR 18 (WN4), and WR 134 (WN6), and an XMM-Newton detection of WR79a (WN9ha). These observations clearly demonstrate that both WNE and WNL stars are X-ray sources. We also discuss Chandra archive detections of the WN6h stars WR 20b, WR 24, and WR 136 and ROSAT non-detections of WR 16 (WN8h) and WR 78 (WN7h). The X-ray spectra of all WN detections show prominent emission lines and an admixture of cool (kT < 1 keV) and hot (kT > 2 keV) plasma. The hotter plasma is not predicted by radiative wind shock models and other as yet unidentified mechanisms are at work. Most stars show X-ray absorption in excess of that expected from visual extinction (Av), likely due to their strong winds or cold circumstellar gas. Existing data suggest a falloff in X-ray luminosity toward later WN7-9 subtypes, which have higher Lbol but slower, denser winds than WN2-6 stars. This provides a clue that wind properties may be a more crucial factor in determining emergent X-ray emission levels than bolometric luminosity.
  • The [Ne II] fine-structure emission line at 12.8 micron has been detected in several young stellar objects (YSO) spectra. This line is thought to be produced by X-ray irradiation of the warm protoplanetary disk atmospheres, however the observational correlation between [Ne II] luminosities and measured X-ray luminosities shows a large scatter. Such spread limits the utility of this line as a probe of the gaseous phase of disks, as several authors have suggested pollution by outflows as a probable cause of the observed scatter. In this work we explore the possibility that the large variations in the observed [Ne II] luminosity may be caused instead by different star-disk parameters. In particular we study the effects that the hardness of the irradiating source and the structure (flaring) of the disk have on the luminosity and spectral profile of the [Ne II] 12.8 micron line. We find that varying these parameter can indeed cause up to an order of magnitude variation in the emission luminosities which may explain the scatter observed, although our models predict somewhat smaller luminosities than those recently reported by other authors who observed the line with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our models also show that the hardness of the spectrum has only a limited (undetectable) effect on the line profiles, while changes in the flaring power of the disk significantly affect the size of the [Ne II] emission region and, as a consequence, its line profile. In particular we suggest that broad line profiles centred on the stellar radial velocity may be indicative of flat disks seen at large inclination angles.
  • We present results of a sensitive Chandra X-ray observation and Spitzer mid-IR observations of the infrared cluster lying north of the NGC 2071 reflection nebula in the Orion B molecular cloud. We focus on the dense cluster core known as NGC 2071-IR which contains at least nine IR sources within a 40 x 40 arcsecond region. This region shows clear signs of active star formation including powerful molecular outflows, Herbig-Haro objects, and both OH and H2O masers. We use Spitzer IRAC images to aid in X-ray source identification and to determine YSO classes using mid-IR colors. Spitzer IRAC colors show that the luminous source IRS 1 is a class I protostar. IRS 1 is believed to be driving a powerful bipolar molecular outflow and may be an embedded B-type star or its progenitor. Its X-ray spectrum reveals a fluorescent Fe emission line at 6.4 keV, arising in cold material near the protostar. The line is present even in the absence of large flares, raising questions about the nature of the ionizing mechanism responsible for producing the 6.4 keV fluorescent line. Chandra also detects X-ray sources at or near the positions of IRS 2, IRS 3, IRS 4, and IRS 6 and a variable X-ray source coincident with the radio source VLA 1, located just 2 arcsec north of IRS 1. No IR data are yet available to determine a YSO classification for VLA 1, but its high X-ray absorption shows that it is even more deeply-embedded than IRS 1, suggesting that it could be an even younger, less-evolved protostar.
  • (abridged) Non-degenerate stars of essentially all spectral classes are soft X-ray sources. Low-mass stars on the cooler part of the main sequence and their pre-main sequence predecessors define the dominant stellar population in the galaxy by number. Their X-ray spectra are reminiscent, in the broadest sense, of X-ray spectra from the solar corona. X-ray emission from cool stars is indeed ascribed to magnetically trapped hot gas analogous to the solar coronal plasma. Coronal structure, its thermal stratification and geometric extent can be interpreted based on various spectral diagnostics. New features have been identified in pre-main sequence stars; some of these may be related to accretion shocks on the stellar surface, fluorescence on circumstellar disks due to X-ray irradiation, or shock heating in stellar outflows. Massive, hot stars clearly dominate the interaction with the galactic interstellar medium: they are the main sources of ionizing radiation, mechanical energy and chemical enrichment in galaxies. High-energy emission permits to probe some of the most important processes at work in these stars, and put constraints on their most peculiar feature: the stellar wind. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of cool and hot stars through the study of X-ray spectra, in particular high-resolution spectra now available from XMM-Newton and Chandra. We address issues related to coronal structure, flares, the composition of coronal plasma, X-ray production in accretion streams and outflows, X-rays from single OB-type stars, massive binaries, magnetic hot objects and evolved WR stars.
  • Magnetically active stars are the sites of efficient particle acceleration and plasma heating, processes that have been studied in detail in the solar corona. Investigation of such processes in young stellar objects is much more challenging due to various absorption processes. There is, however, evidence for violent magnetic energy release in very young stellar objects. The impact on young stellar environments (e.g., circumstellar disk heating and ionization, operation of chemical networks, photoevaporation) may be substantial. Hard X-ray devices like those carried on Simbol-X will establish a basis for detailed studies of these processes.