• We conduct a multiwavelength continuum variability study of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 to investigate the temperature structure of its accretion disk. The 19 overlapping continuum light curves (1158 to 9157 angstroms) combine simultaneous HST , Swift , and ground-based observations over a 180 day period from 2014 January to July. Light-curve variability is interpreted as the reverberation response of the accretion disk to irradiation by a central time-varying point source. Our model yields the disk inclination, i, temperature T1 at 1 light day from the black hole, and a temperature-radius slope, alpha. We also infer the driving light curve and find that it correlates poorly with both the hard and soft X-ray light curves, suggesting that the X-rays alone may not drive the ultraviolet and optical variability over the observing period. We also decompose the light curves into bright, faint, and mean accretion-disk spectra. These spectra lie below that expected for a standard blackbody accretion disk accreting at L/LEdd = 0.1
  • Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most dramatic examples of massive stellar deaths, usually as- sociated with supernovae (Woosley et al. 2006). They release ultra-relativistic jets producing non-thermal emission through synchrotron radiation as they interact with the surrounding medium (Zhang et al. 2004). Here we report observations of the peculiar GRB 101225A (the "Christmas burst"). Its gamma-ray emission was exceptionally long and followed by a bright X-ray transient with a hot thermal component and an unusual optical counterpart. During the first 10 days, the optical emission evolved as an expanding, cooling blackbody after which an additional component, consistent with a faint supernova, emerged. We determine its distance to 1.6 Gpc by fitting the spectral-energy distribution and light curve of the optical emission with a GRB-supernova template. Deep optical observations may have revealed a faint, unresolved host galaxy. Our proposed progenitor is a helium star-neutron star merger that underwent a common envelope phase expelling its hydrogen envelope. The resulting explosion created a GRB-like jet which gets thermalized by interacting with the dense, previously ejected material and thus creating the observed black-body, until finally the emission from the supernova dominated. An alternative explanation is a minor body falling onto a neutron star in the Galaxy (Campana et al. 2011).
  • Massive black holes are believed to reside at the centres of most galaxies. They can be- come detectable by accretion of matter, either continuously from a large gas reservoir or impulsively from the tidal disruption of a passing star, and conversion of the gravitational energy of the infalling matter to light. Continuous accretion drives Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), which are known to be variable but have never been observed to turn on or off. Tidal disruption of stars by dormant massive black holes has been inferred indirectly but the on- set of a tidal disruption event has never been observed. Here we report the first discovery of the onset of a relativistic accretion-powered jet in the new extragalactic transient, Swift J164449.3+573451. The behaviour of this new source differs from both theoretical models of tidal disruption events and observations of the jet-dominated AGN known as blazars. These differences may stem from transient effects associated with the onset of a powerful jet. Such an event in the massive black hole at the centre of our Milky Way galaxy could strongly ionize the upper atmosphere of the Earth, if beamed towards us.
  • We present Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) imaging of the galaxies M81 and Holmberg IX. We combine UVOT imaging in three near ultraviolet (NUV) filters (uvw2: 1928 {\AA}, uvm2: 2246 {\AA}, and uvw1: 2600 {\AA}) with ground based optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to constrain the stellar populations of both galaxies. Our analysis consists of three different methods. First we use the NUV imaging to identify UV star forming knots and then perform SED modeling on the UV/optical photometry of these sources. Second, we measure surface brightness profiles of the disk of M81 in the NUV and optical. Last we use SED fitting of individual pixels to map the properties of the two galaxies. In agreement with earlier studies we find evidence for a burst in star formation in both galaxies starting ~200 Myr ago coincident with the suggested time of an M81-M82 interaction. In line with theories of its origin as a tidal dwarf we find that the luminosity weighted age of Holmberg IX is a few hundred million years. Both galaxies are best fit by a Milky Way dust extinction law with a prominent 2175 {\AA} bump. In addition, we describe a stacked median filter technique for modeling the diffuse background light within a galaxy, and a Markov chain method for cleaning segment maps generated by SExtractor.
  • We present the systematic analysis of the UVOT and XRT light curves for a sample of 26 Swift Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). By comparing the optical/UV and X-ray light curves, we found that they are remarkably different during the first 500s after the BAT trigger, while they become more similar during the middle phase of the afterglow, i.e. between 2000s and 20000s. If we take literally the average properties of the sample, we find that the mean temporal indices observed in the optical/UV and X-rays after 500s are consistent with a forward-shock scenario, under the assumptions that electrons are in the slow cooling regime, the external medium is of constant density and the synchrotron cooling frequency is situated between the optical/UV and X-ray observing bands. While this scenario describes well the averaged observed properties, some individual GRB afterglows require different or additional assumptions, such as the presence of late energy injection. We show that a chromatic break (a break in the X-ray light curve that is not seen in the optical) is present in the afterglows of 3 GRBs and demonstrate evidence for chromatic breaks in a further 4 GRBs. The average properties of these breaks cannot be explained in terms of the passage of the synchrotron cooling frequency through the observed bands, nor a simple change in the external density. It is difficult to reconcile chromatic breaks in terms of a single component outflow and instead, more complex jet structure or additional emission components are required.
  • The optical-infrared afterglow of the LAT-detected long duration burst, GRB 090902B, has been observed by several instruments. The earliest detection by ROTSE-IIIa occurred 80 minutes after detection by the GBM instrument onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, revealing a bright afterglow and a decay slope suggestive of a reverse shock origin. Subsequent optical-IR observations followed the light curve for 6.5 days. The temporal and spectral behavior at optical-infrared frequencies is consistent with synchrotron fireball model predictions; the cooling break lies between optical and XRT frequencies ~ 1.9 days after the burst. The inferred electron energy index is $p = 1.8 \pm 0.2$, which would however imply an X-ray decay slope flatter than observed. The XRT and LAT data have similar spectral indices and the observed steeper value of the LAT temporal index is marginally consistent with the predicted temporal decay in the radiative regime of the forward shock model. Absence of a jet break during the first 6 days implies a collimation-corrected $\gamma$-ray energy $E_{\gamma} > 2.2\times10^{52}\rm$ ergs, one of the highest ever seen in a long-duration GRBs. More events combining GeV photon emission with multi-wavelength observations will be required to constrain the nature of the central engine powering these energetic explosions and to explore the correlations between energetic quanta and afterglow emission.
  • Deep Swift UV/Optical Telescope (UVOT) imaging of the Chandra Deep Field South is used to measure galaxy number counts in three near ultraviolet (NUV) filters (uvw2: 1928 A, uvm2: 2246 A, uvw1: 2600 A) and the u band (3645 A). UVOT observations cover the break in the slope of the NUV number counts with greater precision than the number counts by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), spanning a range from 21 < m_AB < 25. Number counts models confirm earlier investigations in favoring models with an evolving galaxy luminosity function.
  • Willman 1 is a small low surface-brightness object identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and tentatively classified as a very low luminosity dSph galaxy. Further study has supported this classification while hinting that it may be undergoing disruption by the Milky Way potential. In an effort to better constrain the nature of Willman 1, we present a comprehensive analysis of the brightest stars in a 0.6 square degree field centered on the overdensity. High-resolution HET spectra of two previously identified Willman 1 RGB stars show that one is a metal-rich foreground dwarf while the other is a metal-poor giant. The one RGB star that we confirm as a member of Willman 1 has a low metallicity ([Fe/H]=-2.2) and a surprisingly low alpha-element abundance ([alpha/Fe]=-0.11). Washington+DDO51 photometry indicates that 2-5 of the seven brightest Willman 1 stars identified in previous studies are actually dwarf stars, including some of the more metal-rich stars that have been used to argue both for an abundance spread and a more metal-rich stellar population than galaxies of similar luminosity. The remaining stars are too blue or too faint for photometric classification. The Washington+DDO51 photometry identifies three potential RGB stars in the field but HET spectra show that they are background halo stars. Time series photometry identifies one apparent variable star in the field, but it is unlikely to be associated with Willman 1. Our wide-field survey indicates that over 0.6 square degrees, Willman 1 does not have a single RR Lyrae star, a single BHB star or a single RGB star beyond its tidal radius. While our results confirm that Willman 1 is most likely a low-luminosity metal-poor dSph galaxy, the possibility remains that it is a tidally disrupted metal-poor globular cluster.
  • We present a wide-field (4.5 deg^2) photometric and spectroscopic survey of the Leo I dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxy to explore its extended morphology and dynamics. As in previous papers in this series, we take advantage of photometry in the M, T_2, and DDO51 filter system to select LeoI red giant branch star candidates, and, so far, this selection technique has proven 100% reliable in selecting actual Leo I members among more than 100 M < 21.5 Leo I giant candidates having previous or new Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy to a radius >1.3 times the limiting radius of the fitted, central King profile. The two-dimensional distribution of all similarly-selected Leo I giant candidates is well fitted by a central single-component King profile of limiting radius 13.3 arcmin, but many giant stars are found outside this newly derived King limiting radius. The density profile thus shows a break at a major axis radial distance of ~10 arcmin produced by an excess of stars at and beyond the King limiting radius (spectroscopically confirmed to be made of true Leo I members), and primarily along the major axis of the main body of the rather elongated satellite. This spatial configuration, a rather flat velocity dispersion profile and an asymmetric radial velocity (RV) distribution among the Leo I members at large radii together support a picture where Leo I has been tidally disrupted on at least one, but at most two, perigalactic passages of a massive Local Group member. (abridged)
  • We report the results of a photometric search for giant stars associated with the cores of four high velocity clouds (HVCs) -- two of which are compact HVCs -- using the Las Campanas Du Pont 2.5 meter and Cerro Tololo Blanco 4 meter telescopes in combination with a system of filters (Washington M, T_2 + DDO51) useful for identifying low surface gravity, evolved stars. Identical observations of nearby control fields provide a measure of the ``giant star'' background. Our data reach M_0=22 for three of the HVCs and M_0=21.25 for the fourth, depths that allow the detection of any giant stars within 600 kpc. Although we identify a number of faint late-type giant star candidates, we find neither a coherent red giant branch structure nor a clear excess of giant candidate counts in any HVC. This indicates that the giant candidates are probably not related to the HVCs and are more likely to be either random Milky Way giant stars or one of several classes of potential survey contaminants. Echelle spectroscopy of the brightest giant candidates in one HVC and its control field reveal radial velocities representative of the canonical Galactic stellar populations. In addition to these null results, no evidence of any young HVC stellar populations -- represented by blue main sequence stars -- is found, a result consistent with previous searches. Our methodology, specifically designed to find faint diffuse stellar populations, places the tightest upper limit yet on the total stellar mass of HVCs of a few 10^5 M_{\sun}.
  • The Type II-P supernova 2004dj in the nearby galaxy NGC 2403 occurred at a position coincident with object 96 in the list of luminous stars and clusters in this galaxy published by Sandage in 1984. The coincidence is established definitively through astrometric registration of our ground-based archival images of NGC 2403 with our recent images showing the SN. The archival images show that Sandage 96 is slightly resolved from the ground. Pre-outburst blue spectrograms obtained by Humphreys and Aaronson reveal that Sandage 96 has a composite spectrum, dominated in the blue region by A- and B-type stars, while infrared photometry shows that Sandage 96 also contains red supergiants. These results demonstrate that Sandage 96 is a young compact cluster. We have studied the stellar population of Sandage 96, using published photometric measurements combined with a chi-square-fitting code. We derive a cluster age of 13.6 Ma, a reddening of E(4405-5495)=0.172, and a total stellar mass of 24 000 M_Sun. For this cluster age, the SN progenitor had a main-sequence mass of 15 M_Sun. Post-outburst photometry of Sandage 96 may establish whether the progenitor was a red or blue supergiant.
  • In an effort to more precisely define the spatial distribution of Galactic field stars, we present an analysis of the photometric parallaxes of 70,000 stars covering nearly 15 square degrees in seven Kapteyn Selected Areas. We address the affects of Malmquist Bias, subgiant/giant contamination, metallicity and binary stars upon the derived density laws. The affect of binary stars is the most significant. We find that while the disk-like populations of the Milky Way are easily constrained in a simultaneous analysis of all seven fields, no good simultaneous solution for the halo is found. We have applied halo density laws taken from other studies and find that the Besancon flattened power law halo model (c/a=0.6, r^-2.75) produces the best fit to our data. With this halo, the thick disk has a scale height of 750 pc with an 8.5% normalization to the old disk. The old disk scale height is 280-300 pc. Corrected for a binary fraction of 50%, these scale heights are 940 pc and 350-375 pc, respectively. Even with this model, there are systematic discrepancies between the observed and predicted density distributions. Our model produces density overpredictions in the inner Galaxy and density underpredictions in the outer Galaxy. A possible solution is modeling the stellar halo as a two-component system in which the halo has a flattened inner distribution and a roughly spherical, but substructured outer distribution. Further reconciliation could be provided by a flared thick disk, a structure consistent with a merger origin for that population. (Abridged)
  • The reduced proper motion diagram (RPMD) for a complete sample of faint stars with high accuracy proper motions in the North Galactic Pole field SA57 is investigated. Eight stars with very large reduced proper motions are identified as faint white dwarf candidates. We discriminate these white dwarf candidates from the several times more numerous QSOs based on proper motion and variability. We discuss the implausibility that these stars could be any kind of survey contaminant. If {\it bona fide} white dwarfs, the eight candidates found here represent a portion of the white dwarf population hitherto uninvestigated by previous surveys by virtue of the faint magnitudes and low proper motions. The newly discovered stars suggest a disk white dwarf scaleheight larger than the values of 250-350 pc typically assumed in assessments of the local white dwarf density. Both a <V/V_{max}> and a more complex maximum likelihood analysis of the spatial distribution of our likely thin disk white dwarfs yield scaleheights of 400-600 pc while at the same time give a reasonable match to the local white dwarf volume density found in other surveys. Our results could have interesting implications for white dwarfs as potential MACHO objects. We can place some direct constraints (albeit weak ones) on the contribution of halo white dwarfs to the dark matter of the Galaxy. Moreover, the elevated scale height that we measure for the thin disk could alter the interpretation of microlensing results to the extent of making white dwarfs untenable as the dominant MACHO contributor. (Abridged)
  • We are exploring the extended stellar distributions of Galactic satellite galaxies and globular clusters. For seven objects studied thus far, the observed profile departs from a King function at large r, revealing a ``break population'' of stars. In our sample, the relative density of the ``break'' correlates to the inferred M/L of these objects. We discuss opposing hypotheses for this trend: (1) Higher M/L objects harbor more extended dark matter halos that support secondary, bound, stellar ``halos''. (2) The extended populations around dwarf spheroidals (and some clusters) consist of unbound, extratidal debris from their parent objects, which are undergoing various degrees of tidal disruption. In this scenario, higher M/L ratios reflect higher degrees of virial non-equilibrium in the parent objects, thus invalidating a precept underlying the use of core radial velocities to obtain masses.
  • We present a proper motion and CCD photometric study of stars in the distant halo globular cluster Palomar 13. The absolute proper motion of Pal 13 with respect to the background galaxies, derived from moderate scale photographic plates separated by a 40-year baseline, is $(\mu_{\alpha cos \delta}, \mu_{\delta}) = (+2.30, +0.27) \pm (0.26, 0.25)$ milliarc-seconds per year. The resultant total space velocity (315 km s$^{-1}$) implies that Pal 13 is in the inner part of its orbit near perigalacticon. Orbital integration reveals the cluster to possess an inclined, very eccentric, retrograde orbit. These data confirm that Pal 13 is a paradigm "young halo" globular cluster. The derived proper motions for cluster stars are used to produce membership probabilities and a cleaned CCD UBV catalogue for Pal 13. With this data set we have made small revisions to Pal 13's distance, metallicity, position and light profile. The membership of four previously reported RR Lyrae variables and a proportionally large group of blue straggler stars are confirmed. As expected, the blue stragglers are centrally concentrated. The small size of this cluster, combined with the shape of its light profile, which shows a clear departure from a classical King function beyond the tidal radius, suggests that Pal 13 is in the final throes of destruction. This could explain the large blue straggler specific frequency, as destructive processes would preferentially strip less massive stars.
  • We present the first comprehensive catalogue of variable stars in the Leo II dwarf spheroidal galaxy. We have identified 148 RR Lyrae type variables, of which 140 were amenable to derivation of variability parameters with our data. We have also confirmed the existence of four anomalous Cepheids as identified in previous studies. The average period of the RR Lyrae ab variables (0.62 days), the fraction of c variables (0.24) and the minimum period of the RR Lyrae ab variables (0.51 days) all define Leo II as an "Oosterhoff intermediate" galaxy. We have used the properties of these variables to derive a metallicity for Leo II of approximately [Fe/H]=-1.9. The presence of longer period, higher amplitude RR Lyrae variable implies a metallicity distribution that extends to as poor as [Fe/H]=-2.3. Leo II's location on the period-metallicity relation of clusters, like that of other ``Ootershoff intermediate'' objects, falls between the Oosterhoff Class I and Oosterhoff Class II clusters. The properties of the variable populations of these objects are consistent with the idea that the Oosterhoff "dichotomy" is a continuum. The gap between the classes seems to be explained by the horizontal branch of Galactic globular clusters shifting away from the instability strip at at intermediate metallicities. However, Leo II, as well as other Oosterhoff intermediate objects, has a second parameter effect strong enough to leave horizontal branch stars in the instability strip.
  • We present a comparison of semi-analytic models of the phase-space structure of tidal debris with observations of stars associated with the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). We find that many features in the data can be explained by these models. The properties of stars 10-15 degrees away from the center of Sgr --- in particular, the orientation of material perpendicular to Sgr's orbit (c.f. Alard 1996) and the kink in the velocity gradient (Ibata et al 1997) --- are consistent with those expected for unbound material stripped during the most recent pericentric passage ~50 Myrs ago. The break in the slope of the surface density seen by Mateo, Olszewski & Morrison (1998) at ~ b=-35 can be understood as marking the end of this material. However, the detections beyond this point are unlikely to represent debris in a trailing streamer, torn from Sgr during the immediately preceding passage ~0.7 Gyrs ago, but are more plausibly explained by a leading streamer of material that was lost more that 1 Gyr ago and has wrapped all the way around the Galaxy. The observations reported in Majewski et al (1999) also support this hypothesis. We determine debris models with these properties on orbits that are consistent with the currently known positions and velocities of Sgr in Galactic potentials with halo components that have circular velocities v_circ=140-200 km/s. The best match to the data is obtained in models where Sgr currently has a mass of ~10^9 M_sun and has orbited the Galaxy for at least the last 1 Gyr, during which time it has reduced its mass by a factor of 2-3, or luminosity by an amount equivalent to ~10% of the total luminosity of the Galactic halo. These numbers suggest that Sgr is rapidly disrupting and unlikely to survive beyond a few more pericentric passages.