• We present Chandra and optical observations of a candidate dual AGN discovered serendipitously while searching for recoiling black holes via a cross-correlation between the serendipitous XMM source catalog (2XMMi) and SDSS-DR7 galaxies with a separation no larger than ten times the sum of their Petrosian radii. The system has a stellar mass ratio M$_{1}$/M$_{2}\approx 0.7$. One of the galaxies (Source 1) shows clear evidence for AGN activity in the form of hard X-ray emission and optical emission-line diagnostics typical of AGN ionisation. The nucleus of the other galaxy (Source 2) has a soft X-ray spectrum, bluer colours, and optical emission line ratios dominated by stellar photoionisation with a "composite" signature, which might indicate the presence of a weak AGN. When plotted on a diagram with X-ray luminosity vs [OIII] luminosity both nuclei fall within the locus defined by local Seyfert galaxies. From the optical spectrum we estimate the electron densities finding n$_{1} < 27$ e$^{-}$ cm$^{-3}$ and n$_{2} \approx 200$ e$^{-}$ cm$^{-3}$. From a 2D decomposition of the surface brightness distribution we infer that both galaxies host rotationally supported bulges (Sersic index $< 1$). While the active nature of Source 1 can be established with confidence, whether the nucleus of Source 2 is active remains a matter of debate. Evidence that a faint AGN might reside in its nucleus is, however, tantalising.
  • Based on phase-resolved broadband spectroscopy using $XMM$-$Newton$ and $NuSTAR$, we report on a potential cyclotron resonant scattering feature at $E \sim 13$ keV in the pulsed spectrum of the recently discoverd ULX pulsar NGC 300 ULX1. If this interpretation is correct, the implied magnetic field of the central neutron star is $B \sim 10^{12}$ G (assuming scattering off electrons), similar to that estimated from the observed spin-up of the star, and also similar to known Galactic X-ray pulsars. We discuss the implications of this result for the connection between NGC 300 ULX1 and the other known ULX pulsars, particularly in light of the recent discovery of a likely proton Cyclotron line in another ULX, M51 ULX-8.
  • We present broadband X-ray analyses of a sample of bright ultraluminous X-ray sources with the goal of investigating the spectral similarity of this population to the known ULX pulsars, M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. We perform a phase-resolved analysis of the broadband XMM-Newton+NuSTAR dataset of NGC5907 ULX, finding that the pulsed emission from the accretion column in this source exhibits a similar spectral shape to that seen in both M82 X-2 and NGC7793 P13, and that this is responsible for the excess emission observed at the highest energies when the spectra are fit with accretion disk models. We then demonstrate that similar 'hard' excesses are seen in all the ULXs in the broadband sample. Finally, for the ULXs where the nature of the accretor is currently unknown, we test whether the hard excesses are all consistent with being produced by an accretion column similar to those present in M82 X-2, NGC7793 P13 and NGC5907 ULX. Based on the average shape of the pulsed emission, we find that in all cases a similar accretion column can successfully reproduce the observed data, consistent with the hypothesis that this ULX sample may be dominated by neutron star accretors. Compared to the known pulsar ULXs, our spectral fits for the remaining ULXs suggest that the non-pulsed emission from the accretion flow beyond the magnetosphere makes a stronger relative contribution than the component associated with the accretion column. If these sources do also contain neutron star accretors, this may help to explain the lack of detected pulsations.
  • With the first direct detection of merging black holes in 2015, the era of gravitational wave (GW) astrophysics began. A complete picture of compact object mergers, however, requires the detection of an electromagnetic (EM) counterpart. We report ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations by Swift and the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope ARray (NuSTAR) of the EM counterpart of the binary neutron star merger GW170817. The bright, rapidly fading ultraviolet emission indicates a high mass ($\approx0.03$ solar masses) wind-driven outflow with moderate electron fraction ($Y_{e}\approx0.27$). Combined with the X-ray limits, we favor an observer viewing angle of $\approx 30^{\circ}$ away from the orbital rotation axis, which avoids both obscuration from the heaviest elements in the orbital plane and a direct view of any ultra-relativistic, highly collimated ejecta (a gamma-ray burst afterglow).
  • We obtained 16 VLT/X-shooter observations of GX 339-4 in quiescence in the period May - September 2016 and detected absorption lines from the donor star in its NIR spectrum. This allows us to measure the radial velocity curve and projected rotational velocity of the donor for the first time. We confirm the 1.76 day orbital period and we find that $K_2$ = $219 \pm 3$ km s$^{-1}$, $\gamma = 26 \pm 2$ km s$^{-1}$ and $v \sin i = 64 \pm 8$ km s$^{-1}$. From these values we compute a mass function $f(M) =1.91 \pm 0.08~M_{\odot}$, a factor $\sim 3$ lower than previously reported, and a mass ratio $q = 0.18 \pm 0.05$. We confirm the donor is a K-type star and estimate that it contributes $\sim 45-50\%$ of the light in the $J$- and H-band. We constrain the binary inclination to $37^\circ < i < 78^\circ$ and the black hole mass to $2.3~M_{\odot} < M_\mathrm{BH} < 9.5~M_{\odot}$. GX 339-4 may therefore be the first black hole to fall in the 'mass-gap' of $2-5~M_{\odot}$.
  • We present the results of our continued systematic search for near-infrared (NIR) candidate counterparts to ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) within 10 Mpc. We observed 42 ULXs in 24 nearby galaxies and detected NIR candidate counterparts to 15 ULXs. Fourteen of these ULXs appear to have a single candidate counterpart in our images and the remaining ULX has 2 candidate counterparts. Seven ULXs have candidate counterparts with absolute magnitudes in the range between -9.26 and -11.18 mag, consistent with them being red supergiants (RSGs). The other eight ULXs have candidate counterparts with absolute magnitudes too bright to be a single stellar source. Some of these NIR sources show extended morphology or colours expected for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), strongly suggesting that they are likely stellar clusters or background galaxies. The red supergiant candidate counterparts form a valuable sample for follow-up spectroscopic observations to confirm their nature, with the ultimate goal of directly measuring the mass of the compact accretor that powers the ULX using binary Doppler shifts.
  • We report the detection of a $78.1\pm0.5$ day period in the X-ray lightcurve of the extreme ultraluminous X-ray source NGC 5907 ULX1 ($L_{\rm{X,peak}}\sim5\times10^{40}$ erg s$^{-1}$), discovered during an extensive monitoring program with Swift. These periodic variations are strong, with the observed flux changing by a factor of $\sim$3-4 between the peaks and the troughs of the cycle; our simulations suggest that the observed periodicity is detected comfortably in excess of 3$\sigma$ significance. We discuss possible origins for this X-ray period, but conclude that at the current time we cannot robustly distinguish between orbital and super-orbital variations.
  • In the context of infinitesimal strain plasticity with hardening, we derive a stochastic homogenization result. We assume that the coefficients of the equation are random functions: elasticity tensor, hardening parameter and flow-rule function are given through a dynamical system on a probability space. A parameter $\eps>0$ denotes the typical length scale of oscillations. We derive effective equations that describe the behavior of solutions in the limit $\eps\to 0$. The homogenization limit is based on the needle-problem approach: We verify that the stochastic coefficients "allow averaging": In average, a strain evolution $[0,T]\ni t\mapsto \xi(t) \in \symM$ induces a stress evolution $[0,T]\ni t\mapsto \Sigma(\xi)(t) \in \symM$. With the abstract result of [9] we obtain the stochastic homogenization limit.
  • We present H-band spectra of the candidate counterparts of five ULXs (two in NGC 925, two in NGC 4136, and Holmberg II X-1) obtained with Keck/MOSFIRE. The candidate counterparts of two ULXs (J022721+333500 in NGC 925 and J120922+295559 in NGC 4136) have spectra consistent with (M-type) red supergiants (RSGs). We obtained two epochs of spectroscopy of the candidate counterpart to J022721+333500, separated by 10 months, but discovered no radial velocity variations with a 2-$\sigma$ upper limit of 40 km/s. If the RSG is the donor star of the ULX, the most likely options are that either the system is seen at low inclination (< 40$^\circ$), or the black hole mass is less than 100 M$_\odot$, unless the orbital period is longer than 6 years, in which case the obtained limit is not constraining. The spectrum of the counterpart to J120922+295559 shows emission lines on top of its stellar spectrum, and the remaining three counterparts do not show absorption lines that can be associated with the atmosphere of a star; their spectra are instead dominated by emission lines. Those counterparts with RSG spectra may be used in the future to search for radial velocity variations, and, if those are present, determine dynamical constraints on the mass of the accretor.
  • We present two epochs of near-infrared spectroscopy of the candidate red supergiant counterpart to RX~J004722.4-252051, a ULX in NGC 253. We measure radial velocities of the object and its approximate spectral type by cross-correlating our spectra with those of known red supergiants. Our VLT/X-shooter spectrum is best matched by that of early M-type supergiants, confirming the red supergiant nature of the candidate counterpart. The radial velocity of the spectrum, taken on 2014, August 23, is $417 \pm 4$ km/s. This is consistent with the radial velocity measured in our spectrum taken with Magellan/MMIRS on 2013, June 28, of $410 \pm 70$ km/s, although the large error on the latter implies that a radial velocity shift expected for a black hole of tens of $M_\odot$ can easily be hidden. Using nebular emission lines we find that the radial velocity due to the rotation of NGC 253 is 351 $\pm$ 4 km/s at the position of the ULX. Thus the radial velocity of the counterpart confirms that the source is located in NGC 253, but also shows an offset with respect to the local bulk motion of the galaxy of 66 $\pm$ 6 km/s. We argue that the most likely origin for this displacement lies either in a SN kick, requiring a system containing a $\gtrsim 50$ $M_\odot$ black hole, and/or in orbital radial velocity variations in the ULX binary system, requiring a $\gtrsim 100$ $M_\odot$ black hole. We therefore conclude that RX~J004722.4-252051 is a strong candidate for a ULX containing a massive stellar black hole.
  • We report on six Chandra and one HST/WFC3 observation of CXO J122518.6+144545, discovered by Jonker et al. (2010) as a candidate hyperluminous X-ray source (HLX), X-ray bright supernova or recoiling supermassive black hole at $L_X = 2.2 \times 10^{41}$ erg/s (if associated with the galaxy at 182 Mpc). We detect a new outburst of the source in a Chandra image obtained on Nov 20, 2014 and show that the X-ray count rate varies by a factor $> 60$. New HST/WFC3 observations obtained in 2014 show that the optical counterpart is still visible at $g' = 27.1 \pm 0.1$, $1 \pm 0.1$ magnitude fainter than in the discovery HST/ACS observation from 2003. This optical variability strongly suggests that the optical and X-ray source are related. Furthermore, these properties strongly favour an HLX nature of the source over the alternative scenarios. We therefore conclude that CXO J122518.6+144545 is most likely an outbursting HLX. It is only the second such object to be discovered, after HLX-1 in ESO 243-49. Its high X-ray luminosity makes it a strong candidate to host an intermediate mass black hole.
  • In this paper we present the results of the first systematic search for counterparts to nearby ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) in the near-infrared (NIR). We observed 62 ULXs in 37 galaxies within 10 Mpc and discovered 17 candidate NIR counterparts. The detection of 17 out of 62 ULX candidates points to intrinsic differences between systems that show and those that do not show infrared emission. For six counterparts we conclude from the absolute magnitudes and - - in some cases - additional information such as morphology and previously reported photometric or spectroscopic observations, that they are likely background active galactic nuclei or ULXs residing in star clusters. Eleven counterparts have absolute magnitudes consistent with them being single red supergiant stars. Alternatively, these systems may have larger accretion discs that emit more NIR light than the systems that we do not detect. Other scenarios such as emission from a surrounding nebula or from a compact radio jet are also possible, although for Holmberg II X-1 the NIR luminosity far exceeds the expected jet contribution. The eleven possible red supergiant counterparts are excellent candidates for spectroscopic follow-up observations. This may enable us to measure the mass function in these systems if they are indeed red supergiant donor stars where we can observe absorption lines.
  • We present the discovery of a new type of explosive X-ray flash in Chandra images of the old elliptical galaxy M86. This unique event is characterised by the peak luminosity of 6x10^42 erg/s for the distance of M86, the presence of precursor events, the timescale between the precursors and the main event (~4,000 s), the absence of detectable hard X-ray and gamma-ray emission, the total duration of the event and the detection of a faint associated optical signal. The transient is located close to M86 in the Virgo cluster at the location where gas and stars are seen protruding from the galaxy probably due to an ongoing wet minor merger. We discuss the possible mechanisms for the transient and we conclude that the X-ray flash could have been caused by the disruption of a compact white dwarf star by a ~10^4 Msun black hole. Alternative scenarios such that of a foreground neutron star accreting an asteroid or the detection of an off-axis (short) gamma-ray burst cannot be excluded at present.
  • We obtained VLT/FORS2 spectra of the optical counterparts of four high-luminosity (L_X >= 10^40 erg/s) ULX candidates from the catalog of Walton (2011). We first determined accurate positions for the X-ray sources from archival Chandra observations and identified counterparts in archival optical observations that are sufficiently bright for spectroscopy with an 8 meter telescope. From the spectra we determine the redshifts to the optical counterparts and emission line ratios. One of the candidate ULXs, in the spiral galaxy ESO 306-003, appears to be a bona fide ULX in an HII region. The other three sources, near the elliptical galaxies NGC 533 and NGC 741 and in the ring galaxy AM 0644-741, turn out to be background AGN with redshifts of 1.85, 0.88 or 1.75 and 1.40 respectively. Our findings confirm the trend of a high probability of finding background AGN for systems with a ratio of log(F_X/F_opt) in the range of -1 to 1.
  • We report on Chandra observations of the bright ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) source in NGC3921. Previous XMM observations reported in the literature show the presence of a bright ULX at a 0.5-10 keV luminosity of 2x10^40 erg/s. Our Chandra observation finds the source at a lower luminosity of ~8x10^39 erg/s, furthermore, we provide a Chandra position of the ULX accurate to 0.7" at 90% confidence. The X-ray variability makes it unlikely that the high luminosity is caused by several separate X-ray sources. In 3 epochs of archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations we find a candidate counterpart to the ULX. There is direct evidence for variability between the two epochs of WFPC2 F814W observations with the observation obtained in 2000 showing a brighter source. Furthermore, converting the 1994 F336W and 2000 F300W WFPC2 and the 2010 F336W WFC3 observations to the Johnson U-band filter assuming a spectral type of O7I we find evidence for a brightening of the U-band light in 2000. Using the higher resolution WFC3 observations the candidate counterpart is resolved into two sources of similar color. We discuss the nature of the ULX and the probable association with the optical counterpart(s). Finally, we investigate a potential new explanation for some (bright) ULXs as the decaying stages of flares caused by the tidal disruption of a star by a recoiled supermassive black hole. However, we find that there should be at most only 1 of such systems within z=0.08.
  • In this paper we report accurate Chandra positions for two ultraluminous X-ray sources: NGC 7319-X4 at Right Ascension (RA) = 339.02917(2) deg, Declination (Dec) = 33.97476(2) deg and NGC 5474-X1 at RA = 211.24859(3) deg, Dec = 53.63584(3) deg. We perform bore-sight corrections on the Chandra X-ray Satellite observations of these sources to get to these accurate positions of the X-ray sources and match these positions with archival optical data from the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We do not find the optical counterparts: the limiting absolute magnitudes of the observations in the WFPC2 standard magnitude system are B = -7.9, V = -8.7 and I = -9.3 for NGC 7319-X4 and U = -6.4 for NGC 5474-X1. We report on the X-ray spectral properties and we find evidence for X-ray variability in NGC 5474-X1. Finally, we briefly discuss several options for the nature of these ULXs.
  • In this Paper we report the discovery of CXO J122518.6+144545; a peculiar X-ray source with a position 3.6+-0.2",off-nuclear from an SDSS DR7 z=0.0447 galaxy. The 3.6" offset corresponds to 3.2 kpc at the distance of the galaxy. The 0.3-8 keV X-ray flux of this source is 5x10^-14 erg cm^-2 s^-1 and its 0.3-8 keV luminosity is 2.2x10^41 erg/s (2.7x10^41 erg/s; 0.5-10 keV) assuming the source belongs to the associated galaxy. We find a candidate optical counterpart in archival HST/ACS g'-band observations of the field containing the galaxy obtained on June 16, 2003. The observed magnitude of g'=26.4+-0.1 corresponds to an absolute magnitude of -10.1. We discuss the possible nature of the X-ray source and its associated candidate optical counterpart and conclude that the source is either a very blue type IIn supernova, a ULX with a very bright optical counterpart or a recoiling super-massive black hole.