• Ultrafast pump-probe experiments open the possibility to track fundamental material behavior like changes in its electronic configuration in real time. So far, such measurements have widely relied on high harmonic generation (HHG) with ultrashort laser pulses, limiting the achievable wavelength range to the extreme ultraviolet regime. However, to directly excite site-specific core states of molecules or more complex systems, photon energies in the water window and above are required. Novel light sources based on laser-driven electron accelerators have demonstrated bright radiation production over a wide energy range. Given the phase space of the electron bunches could be shaped in an adequate way, these sources would also be suitable for high-energy ultrafast pump-probe experimentation. Here, we report for the first time on the simultaneous generation of two monoenergetic electron bunches with individually tunable energy up to several hundred MeV. Due to the underlying injection physics, the lengths of the bunches as well as their temporal separation inherently amount to femtoseconds. In combination with established beam-handling and insertion devices, these results pave the way to laboratory-scale multi-beam experiments with unprecedented scope in energy tuning and time resolution.
  • X-ray phase-contrast imaging has recently led to a revolution in resolving power and tissue contrast in biomedical imaging, microscopy and materials science. The necessary high spatial coherence is currently provided by either large-scale synchrotron facilities with limited beamtime access or by microfocus X-ray tubes with rather limited flux. X-rays radiated by relativistic electrons driven by well-controlled high-power lasers offer a promising route to a proliferation of this powerful imaging technology. A laser-driven plasma wave accelerates and wiggles electrons, giving rise to brilliant keV X-ray emission. This so-called Betatron radiation is emitted in a collimated beam with excellent spatial coherence and remarkable spectral stability. Here we present the first phase-contrast micro-tomogram revealing quantitative electron density values of a biological sample using betatron X-rays, and a comprehensive source characterization. Our results suggest that laser-based X-ray technology offers the potential for filling the large performance gap between synchrotron- and current X-ray tube-based sources.
  • Due to their ultra-short duration and peak currents in the kA range, laser-wakefield accelerated electron bunches are promising drivers for ultrafast X-ray generation in compact free-electron-lasers (FELs), Thomson-scattering or betatron sources. Here we present the first single-shot, high-resolution measurements of the longitudinal bunch profile obtained without prior assumptions about the bunch shape. Our method allows complex features, such as multi-bunch structures, to be detected. Varying the length of the gas target, and thus the acceleration length, enables an assessment of the bunch profile evolution during the acceleration process. We find a minimum bunch duration of 4.2 fs (full width at half maximum) with shot-to-shot fluctuation of 11% rms. Our results suggest that after depletion of the laser energy, a transition from a laser-driven to a particle-driven wakefield occurs, associated with the injection of a secondary bunch. The resulting double-bunch structure might act as an elegant approach for driver-witness type experiments, i.e. allowing a non-dephasing-limited acceleration of the secondary bunch in a plasma-afterburner stage.
  • Brilliant X-ray sources are of great interest for many research fields from biology via medicine to material research. The quest for a cost-effective, brilliant source with unprecedented temporal resolution has led to the recent realization of various high-intensity-laser-driven X-ray beam sources. Here we demonstrate the first all-laser-driven, energy-tunable and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source based on Thomson backscattering. This is a decisive step beyond previous results, where the emitted radiation exhibited an uncontrolled broad energy distribution. In the experiment, one part of the laser beam was used to drive a few-fs bunch of quasi-monoenergetic electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA), while the remainder was scattered off the bunch in a near-counter-propagating geometry. When the electron energy was tuned from 10-50 MeV, narrow-bandwidth X-ray spectra peaking at 5-35keV were directly measured, limited in photon energy by the sensitivity curve of our X-ray detector. Due to the ultrashort LWFA electron bunches, these beams exhibit few-fs pulse duration.
  • The structural and optical properties of 3 different kinds of GaAs nanowires with 100% zinc-blende structure and with an average of 30% and 70% wurtzite are presented. A variety of shorter and longer segments of zinc-blende or wurtzite crystal phases are observed by transmission electron microscopy in the nanowires. Sharp photoluminescence lines are observed with emission energies tuned from 1.515 eV down to 1.43 eV when the percentage of wurtzite is increased. The downward shift of the emission peaks can be understood by carrier confinement at the interfaces, in quantum wells and in random short period superlattices existent in these nanowires, assuming a staggered band-offset between wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs. The latter is confirmed also by time resolved measurements. The extremely local nature of these optical transitions is evidenced also by cathodoluminescence measurements. Raman spectroscopy on single wires shows different strain conditions, depending on the wurtzite content which affects also the band alignments. Finally, the occurrence of the two crystallographic phases is discussed in thermodynamic terms.